Connect with us

WOW

A market of dubious remedies has sprung up as more everyday people fear they have CTE

Published

on

Now a story with special relevance as the NFL and NHL seasons are underway. It’s about the fatal brain disease that’s been diagnosed in many former professional football and hockey players. But fear of this condition extends far beyond pro athletes. And that has created a thriving market in dubious remedies, as NPR’s Sacha Pfeiffer reports.
SACHA PFEIFFER, BYLINE: I want to start this story by explaining how I found this story. A few years ago, I worked on a project about a famous football player who had a tragic life and a tragic death.

(SOUNDBITE OF MONTAGE)

Advertisement

UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER #1: A brain autopsy has revealed former NFL star Aaron Hernandez suffered from a severe form of CTE.

UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER #2: Doctors calling it, quote, «the most severe case they had ever seen in someone his age.»

UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER #3: He was just 27 years old when he committed suicide in prison while serving a life sentence for murder.

Advertisement

PFEIFFER: I focused on Aaron Hernandez’s diagnosis of CTE, chronic traumatic encephalopathy. It’s neurodegenerative, so it affects the brain and gets worse over time, sometimes causing memory loss and mental decline and personality changes. I researched whether CTE could help explain why Aaron Hernandez became so impulsive and angry and ultimately a murderer who later took his own life. He’s part of a significant problem in the NFL.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER #4: In a new study examining 111 brains of deceased NFL players, 110 had CTE.

Advertisement

PFEIFFER: It’s also been found in the brains of hundreds of dead pro athletes who played other types of contact and collision sports. But as I did my research, I kept finding people, dozens of them, who never played a professional sport yet are afraid they have CTE. Several didn’t want their names made public, but many openly shared their fears.

LEO PEREZ: I 100% think that I have CTE to some level.

TOMMY EDWARDS: I think I have symptoms of mental illness caused by CTE.

Advertisement

PFEIFFER: If they opened your brain, do you think they would find CTE or the start of CTE?

KATIE WEATHERSTON: I’m sure they would.

PFEIFFER: That’s Katie Weatherston of Ottawa, Canada, Tommy Edwards of Radford, Va., and Leo Perez of Chicago. They’re part of a quiet population of everyday men and women, typically middle-aged, frightened they may have this devastating disease. All have a history of head injuries, usually from college sports. Now they’re dealing with headaches, difficulty concentrating, forgetfulness, mood changes. And they wonder if those blows to the head they took over the years are catching up with them.

Advertisement

VERNON WILLIAMS: We see this pretty frequently. It’s not uncommon at all.

PFEIFFER: Dr. Vernon Williams is a Los Angeles neurologist who routinely sees amateur athletes as well as military veterans, people who’ve hit their heads in falls or accidents, even domestic violence victims who believe their brains are damaged and are convinced they know why.

WILLIAMS: I’ll see them, and they fill out a new patient form. We ask, well, what’s the main reason you’re here for today? And I’ve had people write in, I have CTE.

Advertisement

PFEIFFER: Here’s the problem with that conviction – CTE can only be diagnosed through an autopsy. So while all these people may believe they have CTE, they can’t find out for sure. Even if they could, there’s no treatment. That’s left many of the people I’ve interviewed feeling desperate. And that desperation has created ideal conditions for a flourishing industry of unproven, unregulated health care products because when you’re that afraid, you’re willing to try almost anything.

UNIDENTIFIED CHILD: Coach, I’m winning. I got five to zero.

PFEIFFER: Lee Brush understands that state of mind.

Advertisement

LEE BRUSH: Five to zero? Johnny, you dropped one?

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: Just keep going. Go.

JOHNNY: Yeah.

Advertisement

BRUSH: What?

PFEIFFER: Brush coaches his son’s flag football team in Scottsdale, Ariz. Brush got multiple concussions back when he played college football for Purdue University. He’s also had head injuries from skiing and skateboarding and from a car crash once. Several of them knocked him unconscious. He’s now 47. And in his 30s, he started experiencing a cascade of problems.

BRUSH: They weren’t just headaches. They were coming from the back, across to one eyebrow. Then they would slowly go across the other eyebrow, right behind the eye.

Advertisement

PFEIFFER: At first, he thought it was job stress and family pressures. He’s a trained engineer with a wife and two kids. But he began to worry something more serious was going on.

BRUSH: Things that started to scare me were the ringing in the ears. I call it electric southern crickets. Like, if you were ever to sit on the patio at night and you hear all the crickets going, but imagine those electric. Well, I’d never had that before.

PFEIFFER: His eyes began to hurt. He started forgetting things, had trouble focusing. His work performance was slipping. Brush is athletic and physically fit, so he didn’t understand what was wrong until he saw the 2015 movie «Concussion,» starring Will Smith as a pioneering CTE researcher, and everything seemed to add up.

Advertisement

BRUSH: Difficulty thinking, cognitive impairment, impulsive behavior – yes. Depression or apathy – absolutely. Short-term memory loss – without a doubt. Difficulty planning and carrying out tasks – 100%. Emotional instability – you just need to ask my wife that one question.

PFEIFFER: Brush can joke about some of this. But he also had an incident behind the wheel where another driver cut him off, and he became so infuriated that he was appalled by his own reaction.

BRUSH: I wanted to harm the person to the point of probably death. It was just complete uncontrollable rage.

Advertisement

PFEIFFER: What is wrong with me? He thought. That pushed him to get a neurological exam, but the results were inconclusive. Doctors said he may have brain trauma caused by head injuries, but they couldn’t say whether it was CTE. They suggested a sleep study and other tests, but Brush didn’t see the point.

BRUSH: You go to get help. And when you find out there’s no medicine to really help you – we can’t diagnose you, there’s no drug we can give you – you hear there’s nothing they can do, and you go insane.

PFEIFFER: He began hearing from old football teammates and discovered many of them had the same symptoms, the same fears, and had gotten the same unsatisfying responses from doctors.

Advertisement

BRUSH: Every single one of us saying, yeah, we probably have it. Yeah, we got it. If they’ve been hit in the head, they think they have some form of CTE.

PFEIFFER: It’s impossible to quantify how many people might have CTE or harbor CTE concerns because the potential pool is so massive. It includes anyone who’s ever played a contact sport or suffered multiple head injuries.

ANN MCKEE: I don’t know any way to get a hold of that number.

Advertisement

PFEIFFER: Dr. Ann McKee directs the Boston University School of Medicine CTE Center, which studies the brains of people whose families donated them after they died.

MCKEE: But the fact that we’re finding it so easily, the fact that we’re finding hundreds of cases a year – it cannot be rare.

PFEIFFER: Other doctors doubt CTE is so widespread. They say the same symptoms could be due to a curable condition, like a vitamin deficiency or hormone imbalance or to normal aging. But McKee says many doctors are too dismissive of CTE fears.

Advertisement

MCKEE: A lot of players that I’ve talked to who have headaches and maybe depression and some memory loss don’t get evaluated seriously if they think it might be related to their football.

PFEIFFER: So she says they need open-minded physicians who will consider all possible causes of their symptoms, including past head injuries.

MCKEE: And then, finally figuring out that maybe this represents a case of CTE.

Advertisement

PFEIFFER: But since no doctor can officially deliver that diagnosis until a patient is dead, anyone with CTE fears is simply left to wonder and worry. Lee Brush found himself thinking that cancer or a brain tumor would be preferable. At least that would be a definitive diagnosis with a potential cure, he thought.

BRUSH: How are you going to live from that point on after you just were told that you may have something that’s terminal? And then the fear of having that – you know what? I’m going to kill myself if it gets too bad. Those were my thoughts. And they’re echoed by the guys that I have come in contact with.

PFEIFFER: Lee Brush has been managing his CTE concerns for more than a decade. He says he’s in a relatively good place now, thanks to an antidepressant and therapy sessions with his pastor. He tries not to dwell on what he cannot control, and he believes calming his fears has improved his symptoms. But he knows many people who’ve resorted to extremes to try to get better.

Advertisement

PFEIFFER: So you want to lead the way?

EDWARDS: Yeah, yeah, yeah.

PFEIFFER: That kind of desperation is what brought Tommy Edwards to this propane supply company in southwest Virginia.

Advertisement

We think we probably passed it. It’s a place with the gigantic tanks across the railroad tracks.

EDWARDS: Oh, yeah. Be careful coming through here.

PFEIFFER: Edwards is here because he wants a very large propane tank so he can make a hyperbaric oxygen chamber. He thinks that might alleviate what he believes are his CTE symptoms. And he knows that some big-name football players, like Joe Namath, say hyperbaric oxygen therapy helps them recover from concussions. Tommy Edwards has already run his idea by the propane company’s owner.

Advertisement

EDWARDS: I stopped by to check on that tank. I had some brain scans done – trying to build a hyperbaric chamber. You said you had an old thousand-gallon tank…

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #2: Yeah.

EDWARDS: …You’d be able to swing my way.

Advertisement

PFEIFFER: Scuba divers use these chambers to treat the bends. It involves breathing pure oxygen in a pressurized environment.

We walk to what looks like a scrap yard behind the building. Near a back fence covered with rust and branches is a huge, empty tank the owner has in mind for Tommy.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #2: You gone cut the end of it off and then have a roller in there?

Advertisement

EDWARDS: I’ll probably cut a door in the side, and then we’ll put a flange on the inside with some rubber gaskets and…

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #2: Tanning bed as well?

EDWARDS: Well, not so much, but maybe a TV or something.

Advertisement

PFEIFFER: Tommy Edwards has been diagnosed with bipolar disorder. He also struggles with depression and suicidal thinking. He believes his mental health problems are due to CTE. After all, he was such a big football star in high school and college that his nickname was Touchdown Tommy.

EDWARDS: I was vicious, didn’t shy away from contact.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Advertisement

UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER #5: We began with the biggest story of the day – Radford’s Tommy Edwards. He has been known to send many a bad vibe inside an opponent’s helmet with his bruising style of running.

EDWARDS: I mean, I knocked out a defensive back when I was in Boise. It was the ESPN hit of the year. And the guy was just a ragdoll in the air before he hit the ground.

PFEIFFER: Now, Edwards wonders about the damage football may have done to his brain. But the FDA has not approved any treatment for CTE, let alone hyperbaric oxygen therapy. And it has risks, from ruptured eardrums to lung collapse. But Edwards says it’s worth trying because no doctor has been able to make him feel better. And do-it-yourself instructions are all over YouTube.

Advertisement

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #3: This is take two of building a hyperbaric chamber. This one came out successful.

PFEIFFER: Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is part of a growing brain health industry that’s benefiting from CTE fears. Products range from experimental stem cell treatment to a supplement called memory powder. They’re often expensive, not covered by insurance, and many doctors question their value. But if you think your brain is disintegrating and mainstream medicine can’t help, that’s how you, like Tommy Edwards, might end up in a propane tank scrap yard.

Advertisement

In your quest to get better, do you ever worry that you spend time and money on things that might have been a waste of time and money?

EDWARDS: Oh, hell yeah. Definitely. I mean, if somebody said this witch doctor will cure you, I mean, there would be people lining up to the witch doctor, I mean, just because the hope – just the hope.

PFEIFFER: And that hope for a cure, combined with the fear of developing CTE, is exactly what the sellers of these products are catering to. Sacha Pfeiffer, News.

Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Comentanos

WOW

Harris y Buttigieg viajan a Carolina del Norte para promover el plan de infraestructura de Biden

Published

on

Los antiguos rivales presidenciales fueron a Charlotte para promover la ley de infraestructura. También se defendieron de una mayor charla sobre cómo los bajos índices de aprobación del presidente podrían afectar su futuro.



Advertisement

NOEL KING, ANFITRIÓN:

La vicepresidenta Kamala Harris y el secretario de Transporte, Pete Buttigieg, salieron a la carretera ayer. Estaban en Charlotte para promover la ley de infraestructura, y Scott Detrow de NPR estuvo de viaje.

SCOTT DETROW, BYLINE: Primero eliminemos la política. El presidente Biden tiene 79 años. Sus índices de aprobación se han hundido y se han mantenido hundidos. Así que últimamente hay mucha más especulación sobre si intentaría un segundo mandato, a pesar de que Biden dice que lo hará, y si no, si Harris y Buttigieg terminarían compitiendo entre sí nuevamente. En Air Force Two, Buttigieg lo descartó todo.

Advertisement

(SONIDO SINCRÓNICO DE LA GRABACIÓN ARCHIVADA)

PETE BUTTIGIEG: Estamos en 2021, y el objetivo de las campañas y las elecciones es que cuando van bien, puedes gobernar y nosotros estamos enfocados directamente en el trabajo que tenemos entre manos.

DETROW: Toda la charla llega en un momento en que varios miembros clave del personal de Harris se van. En Charlotte, Harris no quiso hablar sobre si está tratando de cambiar las cosas.

Advertisement

(SONIDO SINCRÓNICO DE LA GRABACIÓN ARCHIVADA)

VICEPRESIDENTE KAMALA HARRIS: Sí. Siguiente pregunta (risas).

DETROW: En cambio, se centró en su tarea: hablar sobre la inversión de la nueva ley en el transporte público. Ella y Buttigieg viajaron en un autobús eléctrico.

Advertisement

(SONIDO SINCRÓNICO DE LA GRABACIÓN ARCHIVADA)

HARRIS: ¿Por qué te encantan los frenos? ¿Qué te encanta de los descansos?

PERSONA NO IDENTIFICADA: Donde los frenos – aquí mismo. Tu solo …

Advertisement

HARRIS: ¿Simplemente lo tocas?

PERSONA NO IDENTIFICADA: Simplemente tóquelo.

HARRIS: Y antes tenías que esforzarte mucho.

Advertisement

DETROW: Se sentó al volante …

(SONIDO DE LA BOCINA DEL AUTOBÚS)

DETROW: … Y toca la bocina. Harris dijo que los sistemas de tránsito de Estados Unidos son demasiado viejos y demasiado lentos.

Advertisement

(SONIDO SINCRÓNICO DE LA GRABACIÓN ARCHIVADA)

HARRIS: Y las personas que usan el transporte público para sus desplazamientos a menudo pasan mucho más tiempo en tránsito, tiempo que podrían estar pasando con sus amigos y familiares.

DETROW: Mientras Harris se enfocó en la nueva ley, Buttigieg hizo hincapié en elogiar a Harris por ayudar a que se aprobara. Habló de una reunión clave con legisladores.

Advertisement

(SONIDO SINCRÓNICO DE LA GRABACIÓN ARCHIVADA)

BUTTIGIEG: En el momento justo, habló el vicepresidente. Y su mensaje fue sobre la necesidad de pensar en grande, no perderse en los detalles de la política, sino recordar la naturaleza única de la oportunidad que tenemos frente a nosotros.

DETROW: ¿Sus próximas oportunidades? Promover ese próximo gran proyecto de ley de gastos todavía está estancado en el Congreso y cambiar la suerte política de la administración Biden.

Advertisement

Scott Detrow, NPR News, Charlotte.

(SONIDO SINCRÓNICO DEL «GRAN JEFE CON UNA CORONA DE ORO» DE MATT JORGENSEN)

Copyright © 2021 NPR. Reservados todos los derechos. Visite las páginas de términos de uso y permisos de nuestro sitio web en www.npr.org para obtener más información.

Advertisement

Verb8tm, Inc., un contratista de NPR, crea las transcripciones de NPR en una fecha límite urgente, y se producen mediante un proceso de transcripción patentado desarrollado con NPR. Este texto puede no estar en su forma final y puede ser actualizado o revisado en el futuro. La precisión y la disponibilidad pueden variar. El registro autorizado de la programación de NPR es el registro de audio.

Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading

WOW

La locura del arte NFT llega a Miami Art Basel

Published

on

David Folkenflik de NPR habla con la periodista artística Sophie Haigney sobre la popularidad del arte de NFT en Art Basel en Miami este año.



Advertisement

DAVID FOLKENFLIK, PRESENTADOR:

La obra de Broadway «Art» se centró en una pintura que era solo un lienzo blanco, quiero decir totalmente blanco, con algunas líneas pintadas de blanco. La obra se vendió por una fortuna. Los lazos entre tres amigos se deshilacharon por la pregunta en el centro de la obra. ¿Eso fue arte? Esta semana, artistas, creadores de tendencias y coleccionistas de todo el mundo se están mezclando en Miami Beach para disfrutar de la exuberante tarifa conocida como Art Basel Miami. Gran parte de la emoción se centra en el arte NFT, un tipo de arte digital que normalmente se compra con criptomonedas. NFT significa tokens no fungibles. Cada artículo a la venta es una imagen digital con una huella digital única. Y al igual que la pintura de la obra «Arte», los NFT están atando el mundo del arte en nudos. ¿Podría NFT representar algo nuevo y caprichoso? Para ayudar a arrojar luz, nos dirigimos a Sophie Haigney. Es una periodista que escribe sobre arte visual y tecnología, y nos ayudará a comprender por qué se está volviendo tan popular. Hola, Sophie. Gracias por acompañarme.

SOPHIE HAIGNEY: Hola, David. Gracias por invitarme.

Advertisement

FOLKENFLIK: Me gustaría comenzar con una pregunta muy simple. ¿Qué es el arte NFT?

HAIGNEY: Entonces, los NFT son básicamente activos únicos que se verifican mediante blockchain. Y así, la cadena de bloques funciona como un libro de contabilidad público, una especie de registro de transacciones y brinda a los compradores una prueba de autenticidad o propiedad. Más simplemente, me gusta pensar en las NFT casi como certificados digitales de propiedad de una cosa en particular. Por ejemplo, una foto, un tweet, un archivo de audio pueden tener este tipo de certificado de propiedad adjunto. Y, por tanto, no estás comprando la cosa en sí. Estás comprando la prueba de poseer algo.

FOLKENFLIK: Así que recuérdanos algunas de las famosas obras de arte de NFT y quizás algunas de las más infames. Está diciendo que un tweet o una representación digital de un tweet con su certificado de autenticación subyacente es un objeto del arte NFT. ¿Cuáles son algunos otros?

Advertisement

HAIGNEY: En marzo pasado, un artista conocido como Beeple, cuyo nombre real es Mike Winkelmann, vendió un collage digital en Christie’s por más de $ 69 millones.

FOLKENFLIK: Sesenta y nueve millones de dólares.

HAIGNEY: Sí. Ese es el tercer precio más alto jamás alcanzado por un artista vivo en Christie’s. Así que eso es realmente importante. Y creo que fue entonces cuando el mundo del arte empezó a darse cuenta de esto. Además, el pasado mes de marzo, 621 zapatillas virtuales. Entonces, las imágenes de zapatillas se vendieron por un total de $ 3 millones.

Advertisement

FOLKENFLIK: Entonces, todas las ideas sobre el arte son fundamentalmente subjetivas. Mucha gente recordará que había un plátano pegado a la pared con cinta adhesiva. Se vendió por 120.000 dólares en Art Basel en 2019. En ese caso, el artista es conocido como un bromista. Todavía fue por 120k.

HAIGNEY: Sí.

FOLKENFLIK: Y las propias NFT pueden venderse por enormes cantidades de criptomonedas valoradas en cientos de miles de dólares reales. ¿La gente piensa en esto como una reserva de valor que es una especie de vehículo a través del cual estaciona dinero y es esencialmente una inversión que se apreciará con el tiempo?

Advertisement

HAIGNEY: Creo que hay mucha gente que está comprando NFT porque es una inversión especulativa. Y la gente está emocionada por gastar su criptomoneda en algo y luego cambiarla por un montón más de criptomonedas en unos pocos meses. Y luego creo que hay otro grupo de coleccionistas que están realmente entusiasmados con el arte digital y les encanta la estética. Creo que hay personas en él por diferentes razones, pero definitivamente hay un gran grupo de personas que están en él porque piensan que estas cosas se van a apreciar.

FOLKENFLIK: Bueno, ¿qué significa para los NFT que esta obra de arte no tradicional se lleve a lugares más tradicionales? Creo que más de una docena de eventos en Miami los incorporarán de una forma u otra esta semana.

HAIGNEY: Creo que esto es realmente emocionante para los artistas digitales porque durante mucho tiempo es muy, muy difícil monetizar el arte digital. Quiero decir, no puedes vender fácilmente una imagen que hayas dibujado en tu computadora. Y me ha sorprendido e interesado mucho la medida en que el mundo del arte institucional lo ha adoptado por completo. Me fascina. Y mucho de eso tiene que ver con el dinero. Creo que Christie’s y Sotheby’s están entusiasmados de poder vender obras por muchos millones de dólares. Pero también creo que son … es la primera vez que creo que muchas de estas instituciones se toman realmente en serio las obras de arte basadas en la tecnología. Y eso es emocionante para mí. Y creo que es emocionante para muchos artistas que han estado trabajando en la esfera digital durante mucho tiempo.

Advertisement

HAIGNEY: Así que hace un poco más de 90 años, ¿verdad? – Rene Magritte, pintor surrealista, pinta una pipa. Y es una representación muy realista de una pipa. Y en la parte inferior y en letras dice, en francés, esto no es una pipa. La pintura vuelve locos a los críticos. Vuelve loco al público. Pero él estaba llegando a este punto interesante, creo, me parece décadas después acerca de la representación, el arte y la realidad. ¿Cuáles son algunos de los conceptos interesantes que los artistas están explorando de esta manera en la medida en que los hay?

FOLKENFLIK: Creo que muchos artistas que trabajan en la esfera de NFT están jugando con todo el concepto de representación, la realidad. ¿Qué es real? ¿Qué es falso? ¿Qué significa ser auténtico? Hubo una obra de arte que realmente me gustó de este artista que se llama Damien Thirst. Muchos de estos artistas tienen una especie de seudónimos de Internet.

HAIGNEY: Damien Thirst, una obra de teatro sobre Damien Hirst. Estaba intentando vender este NFT. Era solo un cuadrado azul, y era un homenaje al «Monocromo azul» de Eve Klein. Y creo que parte de eso fue burlarse de la idea de que estas pinturas que consideramos originales y auténticas ahora se pueden replicar en la esfera digital y se pueden vender especulativamente por cientos de miles de dólares. Así que creo que hay muchos artistas que, como Magritte, se involucran conscientemente con la forma de la NFT y se burlan un poco de toda la burbuja especulativa y que las afirmaciones que estas NFT hacen de ser auténticas y originales. obras.

Advertisement

FOLKENFLIK: Entonces, ¿qué tan interesado estaría el típico coleccionista de arte que en años pasados ​​se dirigió a Miami Beach para Art Basel estar interesado en estos o qué tipo de inversionista de arte fresco podría dibujar en su lugar?

HAIGNEY: Creo que las galerías y las casas de subastas están realmente entusiasmadas porque han encontrado una clase completamente nueva de coleccionistas, tal vez alguien más joven que normalmente no compraba arte y que está realmente entusiasmado con los NFT específicamente. Y entonces creo que hay un subconjunto completamente nuevo de personas que van a comprar NFT en Basilea o en cualquier otra feria de arte. Pero también he estado hablando con algunas personas en las casas de subastas que dicen que los coleccionistas tradicionales se están entusiasmando cada vez más con la idea de los NFT. Me ha sorprendido mucho que el coleccionista de arte tradicional haya decidido apostar también por los NFT.

FOLKENFLIK: ¿Entonces una moda pasajera o posiblemente aquí para quedarse?

Advertisement

HAIGNEY: Creo que los NFT llegaron para quedarse. Creo que, como la pintura de Magritte, esto no es una pipa, creo que hacen que mucha gente se enoje mucho. Y creo que parte de eso se debe a los precios insanos que estamos viendo en este momento. Creo que la gente no puede creer que alguien esté dispuesto a pagar 69 millones de dólares por una imagen digital. Pero creo que, como formulario, los NFT llegaron para quedarse. Y creo que seguiremos viendo qué pasa y qué hacen los artistas con la forma.

FOLKENFLIK: Sophie Haigney es crítica y periodista que escribe sobre arte visual y tecnología. Sophie, muchas gracias por acompañarnos hoy.

HAIGNEY: Gracias.

Advertisement

Copyright © 2021 NPR. Reservados todos los derechos. Visite las páginas de términos de uso y permisos de nuestro sitio web en www.npr.org para obtener más información.

Verb8tm, Inc., un contratista de NPR, crea las transcripciones de NPR en una fecha límite urgente, y se producen mediante un proceso de transcripción patentado desarrollado con NPR. Este texto puede no estar en su forma final y puede ser actualizado o revisado en el futuro. La precisión y la disponibilidad pueden variar. El registro autorizado de la programación de NPR es el registro de audio.

Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading

WOW

‘Wait Wait’ para el 4 de diciembre de 2021: con Audra McDonald, invitada de Not My Job

Published

on

El programa de esta semana se grabó de forma remota con el presentador Peter Sagal, el juez oficial y anotador Bill Kurtis, la invitada de Not My Job Audra McDonald y los panelistas Adam Burke, Karen Chee y Maz Jobrani. Haga clic en el enlace de audio de arriba para escuchar todo el espectáculo.

Advertisement

Nicholas Hunt / Getty Images

Audra McDonald se presenta en el Lincoln Center de Nueva York el 26 de abril de 2017.

Nicholas Hunt / Getty Images

Advertisement

¿Quién es Bill esta vez?
Muévete, Delta; No preste atención al médico detrás de la cortina; El documental largo y sinuoso

Preguntas del panel
Canadá salva el desayuno

Fanfarronear al oyente
Nuestros panelistas cuentan tres historias sobre encubrimientos expuestos, solo una de las cuales es cierta.

Advertisement

No es mi trabajo: Audra McDonald en Burger King
Audra McDonald, ganadora de un Emmy, un Grammy y seis premios Tony, es una leyenda tanto del teatro como de la pantalla. Veremos si puede agregar un premio más a su estante jugando nuestro juego llamado «¡Oye, McDonald, prueba un Whopper!»

Preguntas del panel
No tire al bebé con el sofá; Nidos vacíos toman vuelo

Limericks
Bill Kurtis lee tres limericks relacionados con las noticias: Conversaciones con Randos; Chozas de salchichas; ¡y relájate el labio, asistentes al concierto!

Advertisement

Relámpago rellena el espacio en blanco
Todas las novedades no cabían en ningún otro lado.

Predicciones
Nuestros panelistas predicen qué escenas eliminadas se revelarán de ese documental de los Beatles.

Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading

Facebook

¿Búscas empleo?

Videos

Lo más visto