Connect with us

WOW

Benching the patriarchy: 50 years of Title IX and how 4 women fought for change

Published

on

The University of Oregon Hall of Fame induction ceremony was held on campus in Eugene, Ore., in May.

There’s a glass case in a hallway at the University of Oregon that looks like it should be in a museum. The case sits in the university’s state-of-the-art basketball arena and holds an exhibit of women’s shoes.
Basketball shoes.

Advertisement

Kelly Graves, the current women’s basketball head coach, proudly points to one of them — white, with wings on the back heels, and chartreuse neon trim.

«It’s the first shoe Nike ever made specifically for one women’s basketball team,» he says. «They made that for us our Final Four year.»

It’s a stylish looking shoe, but it’s also something more — a symbol of the hard-fought movement for gender equity in women’s sports.

Advertisement

The University of Oregon’s (UO) women’s basketball team is good, really good.

Under coach Graves, they’ve won the Pac-12 title three times. In 2019, they made it to the Final Four of the NCAA championships.

Satou Sabally of the Oregon Ducks drives to the basket against the Baylor Lady Bears during the first quarter in the semifinals of the 2019 NCAA Women’s Final Four on April 5, 2019.

Advertisement

But this hasn’t always been the case. Fifty years ago, in 1972, the University of Oregon didn’t even have a women’s basketball team. That same year, Congress passed the law known as Title IX, which bans discrimination based on gender in education, including sports.

Title IX opened up a world that had been dominated by men, and promised to completely change college sports.

One year later, Oregon’s first women’s varsity basketball team was created.

Advertisement

Still, the team did not receive equal treatment. It also took another 20 years before the University of Oregon hired its first full-time female basketball coach.

When Jody Runge arrived in 1993, she seized on the promise of equity in Title IX. But what Runge found was an athletic department with clear disparities between men’s and women’s basketball.

Jody Runge arrived at University of Oregon in 1993 and coached the women’s basketball team until 2001.

The men’s team got better practice times, a locker room with showers, more promotions to bring in fans. The men’s coach got more pay. These kinds of inequities were a reality at universities all across the country.

Advertisement

Many women in college athletics believed schools were failing to meet their legal obligations under Title IX. Runge tried to hold the athletic department accountable.

She was successful in many ways, but eventually lost not only her job, but her career. And her accomplishments in improving equity at Oregon were ignored for years. Runge paid a high price for her fight.

Advertisement

Graves coaches in a different world than Runge and women who came before her. The women’s team plays in a brand new arena. The locker rooms are spacious and comfortable. Graves has an office that overlooks the practice courts. And some of his star players, including Sabrina Ionescu, Satou Sabally, and Ruthy Hebard have moved on to the rapidly growing WNBA.

Runge holds a framed newspaper article about returning to UO for the closing of McArthur court.

Graves also coached Sedona Prince, whose video calling out vast disparities between the mens’ and womens’ weight rooms at the 2021 NCAA basketball playoffs tipped the scales toward change.

But the history of the women who laid the groundwork for women’s sports at Oregon has been largely forgotten in different ways. These are women who fought battles, big and little, to try to make the ideals spelled out in Title IX a reality.

Advertisement

The administrator

Roll the clock back to the 1964 World Softball Championships in Orlando, Fl.

It was a decade before the passage of Title IX. Becky Sisley helped clinch the title for her team, the Erv Lind Portland Florists. The next year she accepted a teaching and coaching position at the University of Oregon. Because of her multiple sports and multiple academic degrees, Sisley rose steadily through the ranks, becoming the university’s first and only female athletic director at the UO in 1973.

Becky Sisley was a former University of Oregon teacher and coach. She was the first women’s athletic director in 1973.

Two years later, she was in charge of making sure the university met its Title IX obligations. Sisley says the law defined what concrete steps schools needed to take.

Advertisement

«You had to have equal uniforms, transportation, meal allowance, athlete ratio, and so forth,» she remembers.

But she ran into resistance.

«I remember getting very upset in a meeting, because a man yelled at me and said, ‘You don’t know what you’re talking about,’» she says. «And he didn’t know what he was talking about. One of the athletic administrators. Yelling at me.»

Advertisement

Some roadblocks were harder than others. Getting the equal locker rooms that Graves’s team enjoys took decades. Sisley oversaw the first steps. Under her leadership, the volleyball and basketball teams were granted access to a former men’s changing room in the basement of the main arena.

Sisley shows her PAC-12 championship ring.

«Those were men-only halls,» Sisley says. «People were walking around nude all the time. So everything was stressful.»

The locker room wasn’t nice, it was full of urinals. But it was something.

Advertisement

In 1977, the women’s athletic department merged with the men’s. It was both a victory and a loss. On the one hand, Sisley jokes, it was nice for women to quit washing their own uniforms at home and be able to use the laundry services already set up for the men. But her agency was washed away; she lost the opportunity to run her own department. And the merger didn’t put the men’s and women’s teams on equal footing.

Two years later, the women’s softball team held a jog-a-thon to raise funds for a playing field. Sisley left her administrator position in 1979, after increasing the women’s athletic budget eleven-fold, starting athletic scholarships for women, and helping put on the first co-ed track and field meet at the University of Oregon.

«I think of all the struggles when you started Title IX, you know, it just didn’t happen overnight,» Sisley says. «It took battles.»

Advertisement

The athlete

Peg Rees was born an athlete, but in the late 1950s, years before Title IX. Her parents supported her playing sports, even if the law and wider culture did not.

«If I asked for something at Christmas, I got it,» Rees remembers. «I got a football, I got a basketball, I got a catcher’s mitt.»

Peg Rees led the physical education department at the University of Oregon for decades. Now retired, she announces play-by-play commentary for UO home softball games.

It was strategic. Rees knew if she showed up on the playground with her own gear, she’d get to play. But pickup games were her only opportunity to be on a team. When Rees was in high school, as the 1960s turned to the 1970s, her suburban Portland district didn’t let girls play team sports.

Advertisement

«When they told me I couldn’t do something because I was a girl, it was just such a random thing,» Rees said. «I personally never believed it. It made me doubt all kinds of rules.»

Rees swam. She played tennis. She joined the track team to throw javelin, discus and the shot put. Her junior year, Title IX became law, but that made no immediate difference at her high school.

Rees’s tattoo commemorates her time at UO before and after their logo change.

The first time Rees had the chance to join a real team was her freshman year at Oregon. And she went all in, playing softball, volleyball, and basketball. Rees played on the first women’s varsity basketball team at the university.

Advertisement

She joined the Title IX student committee helping to make the law become reality. After college she taught high school and started coaching.

«I just love the dynamic of being a part of a team and belonging to a group,» she says.

After seven years, she returned to the University of Oregon to coach, then teach. After coaching, she led the P.E. department for decades. Now retired, she announces play-by-play commentary for UO home softball games.

Advertisement

The All-American

Bev Smith learned her early agility on ice. The lake in her hometown, Salmon Arm, Canada, froze in the winter and she and her siblings would spend hours trying to steal the puck from their dad. But that fun ended when the boys grew up enough to join teams. There was not a hockey team for Smith, or any girl.

She says she found herself out on the ponds, with no one else around but cows. She hated to give up her stick, but her mom insisted.

«My mom said, ‘You’re not going to play hockey. You’re going to find something that is more ladylike to play,’» Smith remembers. «She kind of respected authority at that time.»

Advertisement

Luckily, basketball was ladylike enough. Smith joined the Jewels, a local girls team. Her junior year of high school, she watched a former Jewel play in the Olympics. It was 1976, the first year the Olympics included women’s basketball. Watching sparked something inside Smith.

«You know, wow. If she can do that, you know, why can’t I?» she says.

Bev Smith won a full-ride scholarship to play basketball at the University of Oregon in 1978. She still holds the university record for steals and remains in the top five for scores, rebounds, assists and blocks.

Smith made the Canadian national team while still in high school, then in 1978 won a full-ride scholarship to the University of Oregon. She was one of the first female athletes at Oregon to get this financial award – thanks to Title IX.

Advertisement

Because of her natural skills and her dedicated drive, Smith began to change the way both male and female fans at Oregon perceived the women’s game. During her four years, Smith was a two time All-American. She still holds the university record for steals and remains in the top five for scores, rebounds, assists and blocks. She drew new fans to the game, bigger crowds for women’s basketball than Oregon had ever seen.

When Smith graduated in 1982, the university retired her number, 24, as a way to honor her and her legacy.

Then the university forgot and gave her number out again.

Advertisement

«Your most decorated basketball alumni’s retired number is not remembered,» Peg Rees says. «Somebody dropped the ball.»

Rees says that error is a result of years of not taking the value of women’s sports seriously.

Smith now runs the non-profit Kidsports in Eugene, Ore.

After her four years at Oregon, Smith went overseas to be able to play pro basketball. She returned to Oregon to coach women’s basketball for eight seasons, right after Runge. She also continued to play for Canada, competing in two Olympic Games. Smith now runs a successful youth sports program in Eugene.

Advertisement

The team

Last month, at the 2022 University of Oregon athletic Hall of Fame ceremony, Becky Sisley, Peg Rees, Bev Smith and Jody Runge found themselves in the same room together. Sisley and Smith had previously been voted into the Hall of Fame. On this night, former coach Runge was finally receiving the same honor.

Runge, in addition to taking her team to the NCAA playoffs every season for eight years, took the fight for equity further than ever before at Oregon. She won significant changes, including better uniforms, the first multi-year contract for a female coach, and university support to market and promote the women’s team. She left after a very public clash with the athletic administration, and her story was buried.

Advertisement

Jody Runge is inducted into the University of Oregon Hall of Fame on May 7.

A few days after the ceremony, Runge explained her complicated feelings about the event. She said she enjoyed seeing old friends and felt appreciated at the ceremony. But one thing rankled her — the way the emcee that night asked her about her fight for equity.

«The first question he asked me was how proud I am,» Runge said. «It’s not about being proud. It cost me a career. For people to say that I should be proud of that is really insulting, because it’s not something I’m proud of. It’s just something I had to do.»

Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Comentanos

WOW

Una propuesta de perforación costa afuera de la administración Biden permitiría hasta 11 ventas

Published

on

Una propuesta de perforación costa afuera de la administración Biden permitiría hasta 11 ventas

Un hombre lleva una marca en la cara mientras pesca cerca de las plataformas de perforación petrolera atracadas, el viernes 8 de mayo de 2020, en Port Aransas, Texas.
(más…)

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading

WOW

Aerolíneas se preparan para grandes multitudes el fin de semana del 4 de julio

Published

on

Aerolíneas se preparan para grandes multitudes el fin de semana del 4 de julio

Los pasajeros de las aerolíneas llegan al Aeropuerto Internacional Midway de Chicago el viernes, primer día del fin de semana feriado del 4 de julio.
(más…)

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading

WOW

35 veces en las que se descubrió que la gente estaba completamente equivocada

Published

on

35 veces en las que se descubrió que la gente estaba completamente equivocada

Nuestros defectos no nos definen. Es la forma en que reaccionamos ante ellos lo que nos moldea tanto a nosotros mismos como a los ojos de otras personas. Sin embargo, como podemos ver en el subreddit ‘Mildly Infuriating’, no todos están dispuestos o son capaces de entender eso.

Advertisement

Como recordará de nuestras publicaciones anteriores, como esta, esta comunidad en línea con 4,4 millones de miembros tiene mucho contenido para hacer hervir su sangre a fuego lento en cuestión de segundos, pero hay una categoría especial que nosotros en panda aburrido Creo que merece un artículo propio: gente que no acepta que está equivocada.

Ya sea que se trate de alguien que intenta estafar a otra persona con unos cuantos dólares o simplemente abrazando su frágil ego, continúe desplazándose para ver a los personajes que se ganaron la etiqueta de ‘ligeramente exasperante’.

# 1 tratando de conocer gente… apesta

Advertisement

Créditos de la imagen: Devilslettucesalad

#2 Cómo no comprarle una computadora a alguien…

Créditos de la imagen: HyperPickle9

Para obtener más información sobre cómo mantenerse fuera de dichas listas y qué hacer para mantenerse conectado a tierra, nos comunicamos con el Dr. Mike Brooks, un psicólogo licenciado con sede en Austin, Texas, y autor de ‘Generación tecnológica: criar niños equilibrados en un mundo hiperconectado.’

Advertisement

«Un propósito en la vida es aprender, crecer y mejorar. No podemos hacer esto a menos que primero reconozcamos y admitamos nuestros errores», dijo el Dr. Brooks. panda aburrido. “Debemos recordarnos que ‘errar es humano’, y estamos cumpliendo un propósito en la vida cada vez que admitimos nuestros errores. Por lo tanto, desde esta perspectiva, los errores son oportunidades de crecimiento que nos permiten cumplir el propósito de la vida. el subproducto natural del crecimiento y la mejora son mayores niveles de felicidad».

#3 Cómo no vender un auto…

Créditos de la imagen: Dinkleburt

# 4 fuera de un cine en Oklahoma

Créditos de la imagen: Aliento espiritual-139

Advertisement

# 5 Hamburguesa con queso menos el queso = ¿hamburguesa con queso?

Créditos de imagen: Mr_Legend2006

El Dr. Brooks dijo que negarse a reconocer y admitir nuestros errores cuando nos equivocamos obstaculiza nuestro crecimiento y nos ahoga en la falta de armonía. «Esto también aumenta las posibilidades de que nosotros y otros suframos porque cuando no aprendemos de nuestros errores, es más probable que los repitamos».

“Cuando no admitimos cuando nos equivocamos, creamos rupturas en nuestras relaciones, que son la fuente misma de nuestra propia felicidad. En esencia, nos disparamos a nosotros mismos en el pie”, explicó la psicóloga.

Advertisement

«Cuando se trata de relaciones, en particular, es mejor ser efectivo que tener razón».

#6 Mi arrendador ingresó a mi apartamento sin previo aviso (ilegal) para decirme que limpiara mi filtro de pelusas

Créditos de la imagen: kiddo-l

#7 Personas que piensan que mi carrera es un ‘pasatiempo’

Créditos de la imagen: rockpaperpowerfist

Advertisement

#8 Supongo que el 5% no fue suficiente

Créditos de la imagen: De lo contrario_Quiet2324

#9 Kanye West en The Bape Store, 2005. Se probó todos los zapatos y no compró ninguno

Créditos de la imagen: SnooShortcuts3641

Algunas personas, sin embargo, parecen completamente incapaces de admitir sus errores. Por ejemplo, el Dr. Brooks destacó que las guerras se han cobrado millones de vidas, pero los que están en el poder aún no han admitido que podrían haber cambiado de rumbo y evitarlo.

Advertisement

«Las personas tienen problemas para admitir que están equivocadas por muchas razones, pero una de las principales tiene que ver con el ego y el apego. Cuando vinculamos nuestro sentido de identidad a una posición mental y adoptamos la postura ‘Tengo razón’, se convierte en parte de nuestra identidad, parte de nuestro ego».

«‘Tengo razón’ es casi como decir, ‘Soy Mike’ o como te llames. Ahora, mi ego, o sentido de identidad, se ha apegado a una posición mental. Una supervivencia primitiva de ‘lucha/huida/congelación’ Se activa un mecanismo para defender mi ‘corrección’ como si estuviera defendiendo mi propia vida. Es como si una pequeña parte de mí se muriera si tuviera que admitir que estoy equivocado», dijo el psicólogo.

# 10 El hotel se queda con mi depósito porque dejé una mala crítica en Booking.com

Créditos de imagen: coreybeavers1999

Advertisement

# 11 IF * cking Proyectos de grupos de odio

Créditos de la imagen: Incognito_Tomato

# 12 4 lugares en un Home Depot

Créditos de la imagen: RAB806

#13 Regla de oficina

Créditos de la imagen: Jaded-Dot-5239

Advertisement

«[If that turns out to be the case, I] Siento que estoy disminuido, en cierto modo, y tú, la persona de ‘derecha’, ahora eres superior a mí. Esto es realmente difícil de aceptar para mi ego, así que me defiendo. [and] mi ‘rectitud’, a toda costa. Incluso cuando esto causa un gran sufrimiento», continuó el Dr. Brooks.

«El sufrimiento de admitir que me equivoco es peor que las consecuencias que se derivan de no admitir que me equivoco, al menos en mi cabeza. Esta perspectiva, que está inspirada en la psicología budista, es un ejemplo de por qué varios apegos a menudo son en la raíz del sufrimiento».

# 14 Correo electrónico que recibí de un padre después de que su hijo no completó dos tareas en la Unidad de la Guerra Civil de Apush

Créditos de imagen: thewrestlingnord

Advertisement

#15 Supongo que no habrá entretenimiento para mi esposa en este vuelo…

Créditos de la imagen: sombrío

# 16 Lo estuve viendo durante casi 2 meses antes de que me enterara. Le envió este mensaje antes de contarle todo a su prometido

Créditos de la imagen: Carrotcutie69

#17 Estuve en el hospital una semana con mi madre y finalmente saldré hoy y mi madre publicó una captura de pantalla de mi laboratorio de análisis de sangre de esta mañana en Facebook porque cree que aún no debería recibir el alta

Créditos de imagen: TheCodexPlays

Advertisement

Curiosamente, la autoconciencia también nos permite tomar mejores decisiones. En un estudio, los estudiantes que obtuvieron puntajes más altos en «conciencia metacognitiva» (la capacidad de reflexionar sobre pensamientos, sentimientos, actitudes y creencias personales) tomaron decisiones más efectivas cuando se trataba de jugar un juego de computadora en el que tenían que diagnosticar y tratar pacientes Los autores de la investigación argumentaron que esto se debía a que podían establecer metas más definidas y realizar acciones estratégicas.

# 18 Un negocio en Maine tenía esto en su ventana este domingo

Créditos de la imagen: modo bestiaChadF13

# 19 Esto me parece más divertido, pero las críticas están plagadas de personas que dicen que el personal es grosero y que Dosnet hace su trabajo, mientras que la cuenta del propietario hace comentarios chispeantes. Lol

Créditos de imagen: Upset_Force66

Advertisement

# 20 ¿Es hora de pudín?

Créditos de la imagen: Gran Cheshire

#21 ¿Por qué existen este tipo de propietarios?

Créditos de imagen: tobleronefanatic123

«Este mundo a menudo loco e hiperconectado se mueve a un ritmo vertiginoso. Nuestra evolución tecnológica está superando nuestra evolución biológica, [and] no podemos adaptarnos lo suficientemente rápido a los cambios que están ocurriendo», dijo el Dr. Brooks.

Advertisement

«En el ajetreo y el bullicio de este mundo, debemos trabajar duro para sacar tiempo para desconectarnos, reducir la velocidad y conectarnos más con la vida y el mundo que nos rodea. Necesitamos establecer límites y límites razonables en torno a nuestro uso de la tecnología en particular y encontrar algunos momentos tranquilos que permitan la autorreflexión».

# 22 No hay correlación entre el helado y esto

Créditos de la imagen: Odd-Instruction-359

# 23 Esta mujer estuvo así durante horas haciendo que la gente la pasara por encima. Hasta que una azafata finalmente hizo su movimiento

Créditos de la imagen: jugador pesado

Advertisement

#24 ¿Qué tal? No sé por qué esto me enoja tanto

Créditos de imagen: The_Unknown_Dead

# 25 Me ofrecí a tomarle fotos de la cabeza y el cuerpo gratis para enviarlas a una agencia de modelos. No quería conducir todo el camino hasta su casa o pagar el estacionamiento…

Créditos de la imagen: omar2134

Según la psicóloga, deberíamos «reflexionar sobre lo que nos ha ayudado en el pasado para recargar las pilas y sentirnos más centrados».

Advertisement

«Debemos sacar tiempo para lo que nos ha ayudado en el pasado todos los días. No podemos esperar a que este tiempo de autocuidado aparezca de repente en nuestras apretadas agendas. Conectar más con la naturaleza es una de las mejores maneras de crear espacio para autorreflexión. Cuando aquietamos nuestras mentes y nos conectamos con algo más grande que nosotros mismos, esto puede, irónicamente, proporcionar el espacio interior para encontrarnos a nosotros mismos «, dijo el Dr. Brooks.

# 26 Cuando mi vecino en el edificio me acusó de mentir …

Créditos de imagen: YourInfidelityInMe

# 27 Nuestro repartidor mordió la bolsa, le dio un pequeño mordisco y se fue

Créditos de la imagen: yehonatanhersh

Advertisement

#28 Abuela aprobando las habilidades artísticas de su nieto

Créditos de la imagen: BigfootDynamite

# 29 Llevé a un miembro de la familia a la UCI por problemas relacionados con sustancias que amenazan la vida. Después de obtener información adicional de mí sobre ese miembro de la familia, el enfermero (masculino) obtuvo mi número como contacto de emergencia y ha estado explotando mi teléfono todo el día

Créditos de la imagen: BijinRising

La vida no examinada no vale la pena vivirla, dijo el filósofo griego Sócrates, reflexionando sobre la expresión «Conócete a ti mismo», un aforismo inscrito en el templo de Apolo en Delfos, uno de los máximos logros de la antigua Grecia.

Advertisement

#30 El tipo que dice que 1,1 millones de dólares al año no es mucho dinero y se queja de que ya no puede pagarle a la gente 12 dólares la hora

Créditos de imagen: reanudación óptima

# 31 Entonces, ¿por qué aceptaste su solicitud de amistad de Facebook en primer lugar?

Créditos de imagen: Some-Cut-4530

# 32 Ya es difícil encontrar un lugar sin un imbécil tomando dos

Créditos de la imagen: RAF1GAMEGAME

Advertisement

# 33 Vi esto publicado y noté una contradicción flagrante

Créditos de la imagen: Maeglin16

# 34 Una tarde que recibí de alguien solo porque compartí mi perspectiva / no estaba de acuerdo con ellos. Las personas condescendientes realmente me irritan

Créditos de la imagen: jupiter565

#35 El empleador me negó un día libre recurrente por semana que coincide con el día libre recurrente de mi novia

Créditos de la imagen: tarfu51

Advertisement


Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading

Facebook

¿Búscas empleo?

Videos

Lo más visto

A %d blogueros les gusta esto: