Connect with us

WOW

For 8 Years, A ‘Wall Street Journal’ Story Haunted His Career. Now He Wants It Fixed

Published

on

For years, Robert Shireman, shown here at his home in Berkeley, Calif., has been accused of corruptly sharing insider information with investors while serving as a federal official. Those claims aren’t true. But they live on.

Stymied at every turn, accused of things he never did, Robert Shireman figured this summer that, finally, he knew how best he could reclaim his reputation. He asked The Wall Street Journal to correct a story it published about him back in 2013.

Advertisement

Shireman was tired of what he says are false allegations. Claims that, as a top official in the U.S. Department of Education, Shireman illegally provided information to a hedge fund investor who was seeking to make big money by betting against the stocks of for-profit colleges. Claims that he was corrupt. Claims that he left public life disgraced.

There’s no evidence — none — to support any of those claims, despite two federal investigations. So, Shireman argued, the newspaper was obligated to correct the story, or even re-report it.

The Wall Street Journal did not explicitly make those allegations in that eight-year-old article. But its report suggested Shireman might be caught up in something corrupt, despite the lack of any firm evidence to make that case.

Advertisement

The words live on, as words do on the internet. And that’s fueled more false claims, including, years later, in the pages of the Journal itself. Shireman’s ordeal demonstrates how Washington hardball politics collides with the permanence of the web, where a false claim keeps being repeated — long after it’s been disproven.

«Every six or 12 months, somebody — usually somebody who’s probably in the for-profit college industry — decides to resuscitate these old, tired claims,» Shireman says. «And they look for ways that they can … try to smear me. And they find this article and they cite it as evidence of something, even though there’s nothing to it.»

Shireman’s critics still rely on Journal article

For decades, Shireman has labored to protect students from having to pay untenable levels of college debt. Under former President Barack Obama, he sought to make it harder for for-profit colleges to enroll students with hefty federally financed loans into programs that won’t prepare them for jobs that enable them to pay off those debts. Several people independently called him a «true believer» on this matter. (One called him a zealot.)

Advertisement

Attacks on Shireman have arrived seemingly from many fronts — Republican senators, liberal public interest groups, corporate interests. And they have continued as recently as this past spring, from a pro-industry group and a senior U.S. senator. These rebukes have often taken inspiration from and derived credibility from the Wall Street Journal’s earlier report.

The Journal has turned down Shireman’s request to post a thorough correction or a new article. «We are receptive and responsive to objections raised (no matter how old),» Steve Severinghaus, a spokesman for the newspaper, writes in an email for this story. «In this particular instance, we fully investigated the complaints Mr. Shireman brought to us, and after a full review concluded that no corrections were warranted.»

Several news organizations have started reviewing some of their past news coverage when people question whether they were portrayed fairly in those stories. The Cleveland Plain Dealer, The Boston Globe and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, for instance, have recently instituted formal policies to review such coverage from many years ago, beyond narrow corrections.

Advertisement

Justin Hamilton, the chief spokesman for the U.S. Education Department while Shireman was there, says the Journal owes Shireman a public apology. And he argues the paper was used by others with motivations that were not clear until later.

«It’s preposterous. It’s actually preposterous,» Hamilton says. «And what it is is typical Washington. When you are trying to kill an agenda that you don’t agree with, you will stop at nothing to do it.»

These days, Shireman has a good life in Berkeley, Calif., working for the Century Foundation, where he continues to focus on higher education and student debt issues. He remains highly influential in the field. But that prominence and President Biden’s nomination of a former colleague to a senior education post appear to have kept him in the line of fire.

Advertisement

Shireman does not contend that his life has been ruined by the Journal article or the accusations against him. But the allegations continue to dog him. And the experience of dealing with them has worn him down. He typically presents as genial and earnest, but is periodically overcome by outrage.

«Articles,» Shireman says ruefully, «seem to live forever on the internet.»

A celebrity stock trader shared distrust of for-profit colleges

At the dawn of the Obama administration, in early 2009, Shireman joined the U.S. Education Department as a deputy undersecretary. He set the agenda for the new administration on higher education financing with a special eye on reforming for-profit colleges.

Advertisement

Around the same time, a big investor named Steve Eisman had also warned against the for-profit colleges. Eisman had made a name for himself for making big profits by betting on the collapse of the housing bubble that led to the global economic crisis in 2009. (Michael Lewis chronicled his efforts in the book The Big Short; Steve Carell depicted his character in the movie of the same name.)

By 2010, Eisman was not just warning but betting against the for-profit schools, through the financial markets, in a way that would let him make money if their stocks declined. That’s called short-selling.

Education Department officials heard Eisman out before he gave a major public speech and testified before a key Senate committee. And Shireman listened in by phone to Eisman’s presentation. Shireman says he later emailed Eisman a correction of a small statistical mistake. So did a colleague.

Advertisement

Shireman had planned to work in government for 18 months and he left after that period. Several weeks after he left, the Education Department released its proposed new regulations, which were not as restrictive as anticipated. The fact and timing of Shireman’s departure would also be used against him.

A liberal advocate goes on the attack

A leading liberal-leaning anti-corruption outfit pounced. Melanie Sloan, a former Democratic congressional staffer and lawyer who was then the executive director of the nonprofit group Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, embarked on a years-long campaign assailing Shireman, Eisman and the department.

«For me, the focus was never Shireman, it was Eisman,» Sloan tells NPR. «I just don’t think we want short-sellers making policy on the issues in which they are shorting companies.» (Eisman did not respond to NPR’s request for comment placed through a spokesman.)

Advertisement

Because of his bets, Sloan noted, Eisman stood to gain many millions of dollars if the for-profit colleges confronted stricter regulations.

Yet her actions explicitly called Shireman’s integrity into question. Sloan called for formal investigations. She wrote articles focused on him. She tied him to Eisman and questioned his communications with The Institute For College Access & Success, a student-debt policy institute Shireman had founded. She even alleged he unethically had received retirement, health and other insurance benefits as a federal contractor for the Education Department after leaving in July 2010.

‘Government official plus short-seller equals scandal’

The department’s then press secretary, Justin Hamilton, was a Democrat who had previously worked with Sloan on political issues. On this one, he argues, Sloan found a scandal where there was none.

Advertisement

«The idea was that if you said, ‘Government official plus short-seller’ [it] equals scandal,» Hamilton says. «But the equation is flawed, because there was no hidden connection to short-sellers. There was no conspiracy to do the bidding of short-sellers in order to make a quick buck.»

To underscore the point: The only connection ever turned up between the two was that Shireman listened into Eisman’s presentation to department officials in spring 2010 and sent an email with a minor correction of one figure.

Of Shireman, Hamilton says, «I think what you had here is a guy who dedicated his entire career to this issue.» (When Hamiton left the Education Department, he became a senior official at an education technology company owned by the Wall Street Journal‘s corporate parent, News Corp.)

Advertisement

Still, a drumbeat built. In October 2010, an influential financial analyst tweeted that the not-for-profit institute that Shireman had founded had distributed the final version of the regulation to short-sellers before it was released publicly, suggesting the institute had leaked inside information that could move markets and help them reap huge profits.

After the Obama administration announced its policy to curb for-profit schools from piling too much debt on students, the press coverage leaned heavily on the idea of a connection between Shireman and short-sellers, sharply questioning the policy’s motivation. The coverage came from conservative outlets like Breitbart, liberal outlets like Huffington Post and mainstream ones like Fortune.

The Wall Street Journal story appeared to fan outrage

The Wall Street Journal would play a singular role.

Advertisement

In January 2011, the paper weighed in with a front-page story on Eisman’s activities in Washington. Letters pointing to the article poured into influential figures in education, including the Education Trust, the American Federation of Teachers, the National Education Association, the American Association of University Professors and the American Association of University Women. The letters cited the Journal repeatedly and claimed that the investigation was focusing on «stock price manipulation by Shireman and Eisman.»

Those lengthy letters, ostensibly by dozens of different people, were identical in content and even phrasing. Their senders’ identities could not be verified by the Center for American Progress, the liberal news outlet that first revealed the letter-writing campaign in 2011, or by NPR this past summer. NPR sent a dozen emails to addresses used to send the letters seeking confirmation or comment; all but one bounced back.

Two influential Republican senators — Richard Burr of North Carolina and Tom Coburn of Oklahoma — triggered two formal federal investigations.

Advertisement

Largely exonerated, then investigated again

The Education Department’s inspector general posted its report in June 2012. It determined that sensitive material had been handled appropriately and that there had been no disclosures of key information that was not yet public to interested parties. And the audit also found no problematic leaks ahead of the policy’s announcements that could have helped Eisman or others with a financial interest in the specifics.

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission was brought in to look at Shireman’s and his colleagues’ potential financial stakes. No education official, including Shireman, was found to have owned any investments aided by the policy, according to the inspector general’s later report.

The inspector general also investigated the ostensibly illegal benefits Shireman received, at the behest of the late Republican Sen. Mike Enzi of Wyoming. The report found Shireman received about $23 worth of life insurance benefits to which he was not entitled. But because Shireman overpaid premiums by more than $45, the government ultimately sent him a two-figure check covering the difference.

Advertisement

That report did find, however, that Shireman had emailed six times with people from his previous employer, the policy institute. The fact that those emails occurred was potentially in violation of an Obama administration ethics pledge for executive branch officials to not participate in matters directly involving former employers.

Senators Burr and Coburn declared the inspector general’s audit insufficient. And the U.S. Justice Department undertook an investigation of Shireman’s possible ethical violation in 2012. A private letter to Shireman from the U.S. Attorney’s Office for Washington, D.C., said that it was investigating him for potential criminal activity or civil infractions and that he could be personally liable for its findings.

His attorneys say it was wildly overblown. «The investigation was trivial, not about material breaches of any rule or statute, and pursued in spite of lack of evidence,» Stanley M. Brand, one of Shireman’s attorneys, tells NPR.

Advertisement

Nothing ever came of the investigation.

A scoop or innuendo

In spring 2013, the Journal learned of the Justice Department’s investigation from a subpoena filed to secure records from the institute Shireman had founded. And that triggered the reporting by the Journal to which Shireman took exception.

The Journal‘s ensuing story in May 2013 appeared unambiguous. Its headline read: «Former Education Official Faces Federal Investigation.» The Journal‘s lead reporter on the article, Brody Mullins, has for years mined a rich vein of stories involving lobbyists, lawmakers and other players. His coverage of the culture of money and power in Washington has won awards and explored how information circulates in the nation’s capital.

Advertisement

The Journal reported that federal prosecutors believed Shireman «might have violated executive-branch ethics laws by allegedly discussing sensitive government information» with his former institute. And the article squarely placed the investigation in the context of people potentially illegally trading on inside information.

The article mentioned the inspector general’s report that had wrapped almost a year earlier, but did not reflect that it «found no improper disclosure of sensitive information» — not to short-sellers like Eisman, not to outside groups like Shireman’s former institute, not to anyone.

A 2013 the Wall Street Journal article suggested Robert Shireman had been under investigation for corruption, without a basis for that claim. In 2019, two Journal opinion pieces claimed he had left Washington in a scandal. That claim had to be corrected.

«The inquiry underscores how prosecutors are beginning to clamp down on the way Washington handles sensitive government information,» the Journal article read. The chief counsel of Sloan’s organization was quoted warning about Shireman’s possible conflict of interest. The article then included a long passage about SEC investigations into alleged insider trading by government officials and investors — leaving the strong impression Shireman’s potential misdeeds were analogous.

Advertisement

But they weren’t. Justice Department documents obtained by Shireman show that prosecutors were focused on his contact with his former employer.

Shireman tells NPR he did not pay attention to the article at the time.

«It’s perplexing,» says David Halperin, a liberal lawyer and activist who advocated for reform of the for-profit college industry and who, briefly, legally represented Shireman. «They wrote this thinking they were pursuing a legitimate article. The problem was the story was full of innuendo. It was about what [a scandal] could have been about.»

Advertisement

Critics held financial ties to for-profit colleges

In 2014, Sloan once more accused Shireman of «coziness with Wall Street short sellers.» She wrote in The Hill that he «improperly shar[ed] information with Wall Street investors» — something he already had been exonerated of doing.

Sloan’s own financial ties were more clear-cut. Shortly after Shireman left Washington, Sloan had decided to leave Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington for a job with former Clinton White House lawyer and Democratic lobbyist Lanny Davis.

Davis had written a Huffington Post piece attacking Eisman and Shireman and another for The Hill. Sloan pulled back from taking the job when public outcry ensued after Davis acknowledged he had been hired to represent a for-profit college trade group.

Advertisement

And so, in 2014, a conservative outfit called the Center for Consumer Freedom revealed that Sloan’s own group had received $150,000 in 2010 and 2011 from a nonprofit funded by a longtime liberal benefactor named John Sperling. Sperling, who died in 2014, was the founder of the University of Phoenix, a giant for-profit university. Sperling had helped fund other liberal groups that had denounced Shireman and the Education Department rules as well.

Sloan tells NPR those connections were immaterial to her pursuit of Shireman. «Sperling had been a long-time donor, of course. A major Democratic donor,» Sloan tells NPR. «People wanted to find other reasons why we [pursued the Eisman-Shireman connection]. So it had to be the Sperling thing or that it had to be the Lanny Davis thing.»

Sloan says, «We evaluated it on the merits.»

Advertisement

Debunked allegations take on a life of their own

By the summer 2015, Shireman, intent on clearing his name, filed his own request for all relevant documents from the U.S. Justice Department about the investigation. He shared those documents and others with NPR for this story.

It would take years for him to acquire them. In the intervening period, the conventional wisdom had already set in. In 2016, then Rep. Jason Chaffetz, a Utah Republican who was chairman of the House Oversight Committee, publicly pointed to Shireman as an example of how the U.S. Education Department had trampled ethics.

In 2017, the president of Purdue University, Mitch Daniels, publicly dismissed Shireman as someone who had been «caught consorting with short sellers» and spoke of the «ongoing investigations into stock manipulation.» Daniels, a former Republican governor and George W. Bush White House official, was promoting a plan to enter a joint operating agreement to run the for-profit Kaplan University.

Advertisement

Attorneys for the university shrugged off Shireman’s claims that those remarks defamed him, in exchanges read by NPR. Shireman says he didn’t want to sue and couldn’t afford to. He just wanted the remarks rescinded — on the record. He failed.

Robert Shireman says he respects the Journal. «I thought they would at least take some kind of corrective action,» Shireman says, «And I’m quite surprised that they did kind of less than nothing.»

In early 2019, the Wall Street Journal ran an editorial and an op-ed in short succession denouncing Shireman. The editorial said he was «caught playing footsie with a short-seller betting against for-profit colleges.» The op-ed wrongly said he had been «caught sharing information with a short-seller.»

For-profit colleges help fund a Senate critic’s campaigns

Shireman demanded corrections several weeks later. The Journal’s conservative editorial department — run separately from the newsroom — corrected the sequence of events and removed a phrase that said he had been «exiled» from the government. But it kept the false claim that Shireman had been caught sharing information with a short-seller in the column and kept the editorial’s line about him playing footsie.

Advertisement

Then, this past spring, pro-business activists set up the website College Choice Killers that trashed Shireman and others who worked on the for-profit college loan policy. The Journal‘s article from 2013 was given place of pride. Conservative economist Richard Vedder even compared Shireman to the Taliban. (The site was taken down after Halperin repeatedly challenged its veracity.)

At a hearing a few weeks later, Sen. Burr warned a Biden education nominee about his past proximity to «potentially unethical conduct at the department under the Obama administration.» Burr spoke of emails sent from private accounts in «collaboration with short-sellers on market moving information … to try to hide the public scrutiny in furtherance of a partisan objective.»

Burr noted no charges were filed by the Justice Department. He didn’t mention Shireman by name, but the senator’s spokeswoman confirmed that was whom he was referring to. The nominee had been a senior Education Department official with Shireman and who for several years headed Shireman’s former policy institute.

Advertisement

Like Sloan’s former outfit, Burr has his own ties to the for-profit college industry. Burr received more than $47,000 in contributions from the industry toward his 2010 and 2016 Senate bids, according to the campaign watchdog Open Secrets.

In late June, disturbed by the College Choice Killers site and Burr’s remarks, Shireman emailed reporters and editors at the Wall Street Journal. In correspondence he shared with NPR, Shireman asked for corrections on its 2013 article.

The fact of the investigation was fair game, he says. But Shireman strenuously objected to the claims of the mishandling of «sensitive» material and the invocation of conflicts of interest and SEC investigations into investors being tipped off. He noted that his departure preceded the announcement of the policy and that he had nothing to do with the logistics of its public release. Furthermore, investigators said they found nothing wrong with the way the department’s leadership and staff had handled sensitive information or the policy’s release.

Advertisement

The Wall Street Journal responds

In late July, Shireman received a reply from Jay Sapsford, the Wall Street Journal‘s deputy Washington bureau chief.

In an email reviewed by NPR, Sapsford wrote that the paper and others at the time were covering «how financial actors were seeking information that would give them advantages in trading securities and how easily such information flows among agency officials, congressional aides, lobbyists, purveyors of political intelligence and investors themselves.» (Through the spokesman, Sapsford and Mullins declined to be interviewed for this story.)

Sapsford noted the inspector general report used the word «sensitive» 39 times.

Advertisement

«We determined this flow of information to be a useful background to the developments of this story. We stand by that judgment.»

Shireman points to that response and nearly sputters in incredulity, especially given his respect for the news side of the paper. The inspector general had explicitly exonerated department officials, including Shireman, of sharing sensitive information outside the department.

«I thought [The Wall Street Journal] would at least take some kind of corrective action,» Shireman says, «And I’m quite surprised that they did kind of less than nothing.»

Advertisement

Melanie Sloan, the former anti-corruption crusader, tells NPR she was right to raise questions about short-sellers’ influence on policy, and about Shireman, despite the lack of any serious findings against him.

«I don’t have feelings about him now,» Sloan says. «It’s not an issue I thought about for 10 years. I just don’t.»

«In Washington, do people get hurt all the time?» she asks. «Yeah, all the time.»

Advertisement

Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Comentanos

WOW

Terence Blanchard hace historia en el Metropolitan Opera

Published

on

Will Liverman (centro) como Charles en Terence Blanchard Fuego encerrado en mis huesos.

Advertisement

Ken Howard / Ópera Metropolitana


ocultar leyenda

Advertisement

alternar subtítulo

Ken Howard / Ópera Metropolitana

Will Liverman (centro) como Charles en Terence Blanchard Fuego encerrado en mis huesos.

Advertisement

Ken Howard / Ópera Metropolitana

Esta noche se está haciendo historia en el Metropolitan Opera de Nueva York: por primera vez en 138 años, la eminente compañía presentará una ópera de un compositor negro. Después de 18 meses de actuaciones canceladas por la pandemia, la principal casa de ópera del país abrirá su nueva temporada con Fuego encerrado en mis huesos compuesta por Terence Blanchard.

Como trompetista, Blanchard ha tocado con leyendas del jazz como Lionel Hampton y Art Blakey. Ha sido nominado a dos premios de la Academia por sus bandas sonoras y ha ganado cinco premios Grammy por sus discos de jazz. Pero en un ensayo reciente de Metropolitan Opera para Fuego encerrado en mis huesos Blanchard se sintió honrado por la escala de la producción.

Advertisement

Terence Blanchard, un célebre trompetista de jazz y compositor de cine, hace historia cuando se abre la temporada de Metropolitan Opera.

Henry Abenejo / cortesía del Metropolitan Opera


ocultar leyenda

Advertisement

alternar subtítulo

Henry Abenejo / cortesía del Metropolitan Opera

Advertisement

Terence Blanchard, un célebre trompetista de jazz y compositor de cine, hace historia cuando se abre la temporada de Metropolitan Opera.

Henry Abenejo / cortesía del Metropolitan Opera

«Nunca pensé que estaría en una situación como esta, caminar en una habitación y hay como 40 cantantes cantando algo que yo escribí, y lo están ensayando», dijo. «Y luego, en la sala de al lado, hay 16 bailarines coreografiando una pieza musical que yo escribí. Y luego, en la otra sala, los cantantes principales están bloqueando, sigo esperando para despertar».

Advertisement

Blanchard es un compositor de jazz, pero dice Fuego, cállate en mis huesos no es una ópera de jazz. Más bien, lo llama «una ópera de jazz». Lo que pretende hacer, explicó, es similar a lo que hizo Stravinsky al llevar la música folclórica al ámbito clásico. «Estoy tratando de tomar el folclore estadounidense que conozco, que he experimentado, que es el jazz», explicó, «y llevarlo al mundo de la ópera, pero no usar toda la pieza para hacer una declaración sobre el jazz». «

Hay un cuarteto de jazz integrado en la Met Orchestra para la ópera, pero gran parte de la música se parece más al trabajo de Blanchard en Hollywood, donde ha escrito la música de más de 40 películas.

Sin embargo, Blanchard dice que la ópera presenta un desafío único. «La voz operística es tan única, cada voz. No es como escribir para una orquesta o escribir para una banda. Cuando escribes para un quinteto, dices: ‘Está bien, sé lo que hace el tenor, sé lo que hace la trompeta lo hace, el bajo. Lo tienes. Esto, no: un barítono es muy diferente del siguiente barítono, un tenor es diferente a otro. Por lo tanto, siempre tienes que afinar las cosas para los vocalistas con los que estás trabajando «.

Advertisement

Fuego, cállate en mis huesos se basa en las memorias del mismo título de Charles M. Blow. Se trata de un niño negro que crece en una zona rural de Louisiana, donde se eleva por encima de la pobreza, la violencia y el abuso sexual para convertirse en un escritor exitoso.

El espectáculo fue presentado por primera vez hace dos años por el Teatro de la Ópera de St. Louis. Para la producción del Met, se agregaron nuevas escenas, junto con un coro y un grupo de bailarines. Terence Blanchard dice que la ópera, con su elenco totalmente negro y su equipo creativo mayoritariamente negro, es mucho más que su música.

Terrence Blanchard (centro) se dirige a los miembros de la Metropolitan Opera Orchestra en el ensayo, con el director musical Yannick Nézet-Séguin mirando.

Advertisement

Jonathan Tichler / Metropolitan Opera


ocultar leyenda

Advertisement

alternar subtítulo

Jonathan Tichler / Metropolitan Opera

Terrence Blanchard (centro) se dirige a los miembros de la Metropolitan Opera Orchestra en el ensayo, con el director musical Yannick Nézet-Séguin mirando.

Advertisement

Jonathan Tichler / Metropolitan Opera

«Es algo interesante por lo que significa para la sociedad», dice. «No se trata solo de que yo sea un compositor. Estas personas entienden que esta producción va a hacer una declaración sobre nuestra comunidad, y cómo nuestra comunidad ha sido pasada por alto en el mundo de la ópera. No hay un alma en esta producción que no entienda eso.»

El barítono Will Liverman protagoniza el papel de Charles. «Es algo colectivo y todos queremos hacerlo bien. Y contar esta historia. Y solo para mostrar una negrura auténtica y real en el escenario, dolor negro, alegría negra, esta pieza lo tiene todo. Es un honor y un privilegio poder para cantar este papel «.

Advertisement

Gran parte del libreto de la ópera gira en torno a la lucha de Charles por aceptar su bisexualidad; está obsesionado por su atracción por los hombres. El segundo acto comienza con un ballet que presenta a una docena de bailarines fantasmales formando parejas en abrazos del mismo sexo.

La codirectora y coreógrafa Camille A. Brown (izquierda) dirige a los miembros del conjunto de Fuego, cállate en mis huesos en un taller de movimiento.

Jonathan Tichler / Metropolitan Opera

Advertisement


ocultar leyenda

alternar subtítulo

Advertisement

Jonathan Tichler / Metropolitan Opera

La codirectora y coreógrafa Camille A. Brown (izquierda) dirige a los miembros del conjunto de Fuego, cállate en mis huesos en un taller de movimiento.

Jonathan Tichler / Metropolitan Opera

Advertisement

La coreógrafa Camille A. Brown codirigió el espectáculo. Ella es la primera mujer negra en dirigir una ópera en el Met. «Traté de pensar cuál era mi punto de entrada al trabajo», dice. «Y comencé a pensar en muchas de las luchas por las que han pasado algunos de mis amigos más queridos que son hombres homosexuales negros, y cómo fue para ellos crecer, encontrar su sexualidad y sentirse cómodos con su sexualidad».

Blow, el tema de la vida real de Fuego encerrado en mis huesos » ahora trabaja como redactor y columnista de opinión para Los New York Times. Hablando desde su casa en Atlanta, Blow dijo que hay que considerar la importancia de la producción del Met de dos maneras. «Creo que hay que aplaudir a Terence por ser el primero», dijo. «Y luego, al mismo tiempo, tienes que decir, ¿por qué? ¿Hay escasez de talento? ¿O escasez de oportunidades y aceptación?»

La nueva temporada de Metropolitan Opera incluye obras de Verdi, Mozart, Wagner, Stravinsky y Puccini. Blanchard dice que aún no se ha respondido a la medida de su trabajo.

Advertisement

«Esa es una pregunta graciosa», dice, «porque es gracioso escucharte nombrar todos esos nombres: Verdi, todos esos tipos, luego dices Blanchard … espera un minuto, ¿quién es ese tipo? Realmente no lo sé». porque siento, como Charles, mi historia aún no se ha contado. Estoy disfrutando este momento por lo que está trayendo a mi vida, porque nunca lo vi venir. Nunca. Nunca en un millón de años pude ver venir esto «.

Blanchard dice que no le preocupa por qué la Metropolitan Opera tardó tanto en presentar la obra de un compositor negro. Dice que la pregunta clave es: ¿qué pasa después?

Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading

WOW

45 antiguas casas de campo que parecen imágenes de un cuento de hadas capturadas por este fotógrafo ruso

Published

on

45 antiguas casas de campo que parecen imágenes de un cuento de hadas capturadas por este fotógrafo ruso

Si toma fotografías solo por diversión y para preservar los recuerdos, su colección de fotos incluiría tantos lugares, rostros y fondos diferentes. Sin embargo, los fotógrafos profesionales suelen tener un nicho en el que se especializan, como los fotógrafos de naturaleza o algunos fotógrafos a los que solo les gusta fotografiar puestas de sol o personas.

Advertisement

El fotógrafo ruso Fyodor Savintsev también tiene un interés particular que muestra en su Instagram. Realmente se centra en las antiguas casas de campo de las zonas rurales de Rusia y las impresionantes fotos ya han acumulado 122.000 seguidores.

Más información: Instagram

# 1

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

Advertisement

Fyodor Savintsev tiene experiencia en fotoperiodismo y ha trabajado con agencias como Agence France Press, Associated Press, TIME, New York Times, The Guardian, Le Monde, Forbes, Newsweek, GEO Rusia, Russian Reporter, Esquire. También fue el fotógrafo jefe de ITAR-TASS, la agencia de noticias rusa más grande y una de las agencias de noticias más grandes del mundo.

Desde 2011, está más enfocado en sus propios proyectos que en trabajar para alguien y uno de ellos es capturar viejas dachas en Rusia. Fyodor le dijo al European Heritage Tribune (EHT) cómo comenzó todo. En realidad, no es un proyecto antiguo. Debido a la pandemia, Fyodor se mudó temporalmente a la dacha de sus padres y la nostalgia de la infancia lo llevó a investigar la arquitectura de la dacha.

# 2

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

Advertisement

# 3

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

Panda aburrido se acercó a Fyodor y nos contó cómo creó el proyecto: “Al principio, hice un gran proyecto sobre la arquitectura vernácula de las casas de jardín» 6 acres «en la región de Arkhangelsk. Me inspiré en el proceso de pintar casas inusuales. Al regresar a la región de Moscú, comencé a explorar los antiguos pueblos del campo y encontré muchas casas con una arquitectura inusual, comencé a catalogarlas, se incluyeron en el proyecto «Kratovsky dachas», que se exhibió a fines del verano. en el Museo Estatal de Arquitectura de Shchusev «.

# 4

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

Advertisement

# 5

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

# 6

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

También teníamos curiosidad por saber cómo encuentra las dachas y resulta que simplemente viaja mucho y durante esos viajes se encuentra con muchas cabañas antiguas. Las que más le atraen son “las arquitecturas prerrevolucionarias que son casas elegantes con una distribución y estética de decoración bien pensadas”.

Advertisement

Le preguntamos si tiene una dacha que sea su favorita y respondió que realmente le gustan todas las cabañas que fotografía. Pero si tuviera que elegir, dijo que “hay una casa de Arkhangelsk que evoca sentimientos muy abstractos, y hay otra dacha antigua que fue diseñada por el arquitecto Vashkov, fue alumno del artista Vasnetsov, hay muchos símbolos y letreros en la casa. Una mezcla de estilo moderno y ruso «.

# 7

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

# 8

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

Advertisement

# 9

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

¿Qué tienen de fascinante las casas antiguas en las zonas rurales? Para Fyodor, lo más sorprendente de ver esas hermosas cabañas que pueden tener hasta un siglo de antigüedad es que “ha pasado muy poco tiempo, unos 100 años, pero la gente ha perdido el sentido de la belleza, ha dejado de decorar sus casas, aunque ha siempre ha sido habitual. La arquitectura ha pasado de la elegancia al utilitarismo ”.

# 10

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

Advertisement

# 11

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

# 12

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

La gente puede tomar de estas fotos lo que quiera, pero los artistas a menudo tienen sus propias intenciones y Fyodor explicó cuáles son las suyas: “Realmente quiero que la gente comience a inspirarse, he recopilado una gran colección de casas para ellos. Estos son ejemplos a seguir porque muchas personas viven en sus hogares toda su vida, entonces, ¿por qué no se puede hacer de manera hermosa? También conozco muchos ejemplos en los que mis fotos e historias inspiraron a la gente a comprar casas antiguas y restaurarlas «.

Advertisement

¿Cuál fue tu primera reacción cuando viste estas fotos? Comenta en cuál de estas te encantaría vivir y dale un voto positivo a las fotos que te hicieron apreciar realmente la belleza de la arquitectura. Y si desea ver más fotografías similares o ver qué otras cosas está haciendo Fyodor, puede seguirlo en Instagram @fsavintsev.

# 13

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

# 14

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

Advertisement

#15

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

#dieciséis

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

# 17

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

Advertisement

# 18

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

# 19

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

# 20

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

Advertisement

# 21

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

# 22

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

# 23

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

Advertisement

# 24

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

# 25

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

# 26

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

Advertisement

# 27

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

# 28

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

# 29

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

Advertisement

# 30

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

# 31

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

# 32

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

Advertisement

# 33

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

# 34

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

# 35

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

Advertisement

# 36

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

# 37

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

# 38

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

Advertisement

# 39

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

# 40

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

# 41

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

Advertisement

# 42

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

# 43

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

# 44

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev

Advertisement

# 45

Créditos de imagen: fsavintsev


Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading

WOW

Investigadores federales investigan descarrilamiento mortal de Amtrak en Montana

Published

on

Esta vista aérea tomada el domingo muestra parte de un tren de Amtrak que descarriló en el centro-norte de Montana el sábado y que mató a varias personas y dejó a otras hospitalizadas, dijeron las autoridades. El Empire Builder en dirección oeste se dirigía a Seattle desde Chicago, con dos locomotoras y 10 vagones, cuando abandonó las vías alrededor de las 4 pm del sábado.

Advertisement

LARRY MAYER / AP


ocultar leyenda

Advertisement

alternar subtítulo

LARRY MAYER / AP

Esta vista aérea tomada el domingo muestra parte de un tren de Amtrak que descarriló en el centro-norte de Montana el sábado y que mató a varias personas y dejó a otras hospitalizadas, dijeron las autoridades. El Empire Builder en dirección oeste se dirigía a Seattle desde Chicago, con dos locomotoras y 10 vagones, cuando abandonó las vías alrededor de las 4 pm del sábado.

Advertisement

LARRY MAYER / AP

JOPLIN, Mont. – Un equipo de investigadores de la Junta Nacional de Seguridad en el Transporte estuvo en el sitio de un descarrilamiento de Amtrak en el centro-norte de Montana que mató a tres personas y dejó a siete hospitalizadas el domingo, dijeron las autoridades.

El Empire Builder en dirección oeste se dirigía de Chicago a Seattle cuando dejó las vías alrededor de las 4 pm del sábado cerca de Joplin, una ciudad de unos 200 habitantes.

Advertisement

Trevor Fossen fue el primero en aparecer. El residente de Joplin estaba en un camino de tierra cerca de las vías el sábado cuando vio «una pared de polvo» de unos 300 pies de altura.

«Empecé a mirar eso, preguntándome qué era y luego vi que el tren se había volcado y descarrilado», dijo Fossen, quien llamó al 911 y comenzó a tratar de sacar a la gente. Llamó a su hermano para que trajera escaleras para las personas que no podían bajar después de salir por las ventanillas de los autos que descansaban sobre sus costados.

El tren transportaba a unos 141 pasajeros y 16 miembros de la tripulación y tenía dos locomotoras y 10 vagones, ocho de los cuales descarrilaron, dijo el portavoz de Amtrak Jason Abrams.

Advertisement

Un equipo de 14 miembros, incluidos investigadores y especialistas en señales de ferrocarril, investigaría la causa del descarrilamiento en una vía principal de BNSF Railway que no involucró a otros trenes o equipos, dijo el portavoz de la NTSB, Eric Weiss.

Las fuerzas del orden dijeron que los funcionarios de la NTSB, Amtrak y BNSF habían llegado al lugar del accidente justo al oeste de Joplin, donde las vías atraviesan vastos campos de trigo de color marrón dorado que fueron cosechados recientemente. Varias grúas grandes fueron llevadas a las vías que corren aproximadamente paralelas a la US Highway 2, junto con un camión lleno de grava y nuevas traviesas de ferrocarril.

Todavía se podían ver varios vagones a sus lados.

Advertisement

La escena del accidente está a unas 150 millas al noreste de Helena y a unas 30 millas de la frontera con Canadá.

El director ejecutivo de Amtrak, Bill Flynn, expresó sus condolencias a quienes perdieron a sus seres queridos y dijo que la compañía está trabajando con la NTSB, la Administración Federal de Ferrocarriles y la policía local, compartiendo su «sentido de urgencia» para determinar qué sucedió.

«La NTSB identificará la causa o las causas de este accidente, y Amtrak se compromete a tomar las acciones apropiadas para prevenir un accidente similar en el futuro», dijo Flynn en el comunicado.

Advertisement

El gobernador de Montana, Greg Gianforte, dijo que BNSF estaba preparando la pista de reemplazo para cuando la NTSB dé el visto bueno. «BNSF me ha asegurado que pueden poner la línea en funcionamiento en poco tiempo», dijo.

El experto en seguridad ferroviaria David Clarke, director del Centro de Investigación del Transporte de la Universidad de Tennessee, dijo que las fotos de la escena del accidente muestran que el descarrilamiento ocurrió en o cerca de un cambio, que es donde el ferrocarril pasa de una vía simple a una vía doble.

Clarke dijo que las dos locomotoras y los dos vagones en la parte delantera del tren llegaron a la bifurcación y continuaron por la vía principal, pero los ocho vagones restantes descarrilaron. Dijo que no estaba claro si algunos de los últimos autos pasaron a la segunda pista.

Advertisement

«¿El interruptor jugó algún papel? Podría haber sido que la parte delantera del tren presionó el interruptor y comenzó a colapsar y eso hizo que la parte trasera del tren volteara», dijo Clarke.

Otra posibilidad era un defecto en el riel, dijo Clarke, y señaló que las pruebas regulares no siempre detectan tales problemas. Dijo que la velocidad no era un factor probable porque los trenes en esa línea tienen sistemas que evitan velocidades excesivas y colisiones.

Matt Jones, un portavoz de BNSF Railway, dijo en una conferencia de prensa que la vía donde ocurrió el accidente fue inspeccionada por última vez el jueves.

Advertisement

Debido al descarrilamiento, el Empire Builder del domingo en dirección oeste de Chicago terminará en St. Paul, Minnesota, y el tren en dirección este se originará en Minnesota.

La mayoría de los que viajaban en el tren fueron tratados y dados de alta por sus lesiones, pero cinco que resultaron más gravemente heridos permanecieron en el hospital Benefis Health System en Great Falls, Montana, dijo Sarah Robbin, coordinadora de servicios de emergencia del condado de Liberty. Dos estaban en la unidad de cuidados intensivos, dijo una portavoz del hospital.

Otras dos personas estaban en Logan Health, un hospital en Kalispell, Montana, dijo la portavoz Melody Sharpton.

Advertisement

Robbin dijo que los equipos de emergencia lucharon sin éxito para abrir los autos con herramientas especiales, «por lo que tuvieron que llevar manualmente a muchos de los pasajeros que no podían caminar».

El alguacil del condado de Liberty, Nick Erickson, dijo que los nombres de los muertos no se darán a conocer hasta que se notifique a los familiares.

En esta foto proporcionada por Kimberly Fossen, las personas trabajan en la escena del descarrilamiento de un tren de Amtrak el sábado en el centro-norte de Montana. Varias personas resultaron heridas cuando el tren que corre entre Seattle y Chicago descarriló el sábado, dijo la agencia de trenes.

Advertisement

Kimberly Fossen / AP


ocultar leyenda

Advertisement

alternar subtítulo

Kimberly Fossen / AP

En esta foto proporcionada por Kimberly Fossen, las personas trabajan en la escena del descarrilamiento de un tren de Amtrak el sábado en el centro-norte de Montana. Varias personas resultaron heridas cuando el tren que corre entre Seattle y Chicago descarriló el sábado, dijo la agencia de trenes.

Advertisement

Kimberly Fossen / AP

Robbin dijo que los residentes cercanos se apresuraron a ofrecer ayuda cuando ocurrió el descarrilamiento.

«Somos muy afortunados de vivir donde vivimos, donde los vecinos ayudan a los vecinos», dijo.

Advertisement

«Los lugareños han sido tan asombrosos y complacientes», dijo el pasajero Jacob Cordeiro en Twitter. «Nos brindaron comida, bebidas y una hospitalidad maravillosa. Nada como eso cuando lo mejor se junta después de una tragedia».

Cordeiro, quien es de Rhode Island, se acaba de graduar de la universidad y viajaba con su padre a Seattle para celebrar.

«Estaba en uno de los vagones delanteros y nos empujaron mucho, nos arrojaron de un lado al otro del tren», dijo a MSNBC. Dijo que el auto se salió de las vías, pero no se cayó.

Advertisement

«Soy un tipo bastante grande y me levantó de la silla y me tiró contra una pared y luego me tiró contra la otra», dijo Cordeiro.

La concejal de Chester, Rachel Ghekiere, dijo que ella y otros ayudaron a entre 50 y 60 pasajeros que fueron llevados a una escuela «.

Una tienda de comestibles en Chester, a unas 5 millas del descarrilamiento, y una comunidad religiosa cercana proporcionaron comida, dijo.

Advertisement

Allan Zarembski, director del Programa de Seguridad e Ingeniería Ferroviaria de la Universidad de Delaware, dijo que no quería especular, pero sospechaba que el descarrilamiento se debió a un problema con la vía del tren, el equipo o ambos.

Los ferrocarriles han «eliminado virtualmente» descarrilamientos importantes por error humano después de la implementación del control positivo de trenes en todo el país, dijo Zarembski. Dijo que los hallazgos de la NTSB podrían llevar meses.

Bob Chipkevich, quien supervisó las investigaciones de accidentes ferroviarios durante varios años en la NTSB, dijo que la agencia no descartará el error humano o cualquier otra causa potencial por ahora.

Advertisement

«Todavía hay problemas de desempeño humano examinados por la NTSB para asegurarse de que las personas que realizan el trabajo estén calificadas, descansadas y haciéndolo correctamente», dijo Chipkevich.

Chipkevich dijo que históricamente las condiciones de las vías han sido una causa importante de accidentes de trenes y señaló que la mayoría de las vías que usa Amtrak son propiedad de ferrocarriles de carga y deben depender de esas compañías para el mantenimiento de la seguridad.

Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading

Facebook

¿Búscas empleo?

Videos

Lo más visto

A %d blogueros les gusta esto: