Connect with us

WOW

How bad will climate change get?

Published

on

How bad could climate change get?

Humans have already warmed the planet by at least 1 degree Celsius by burning fossil fuels that spew heat-trapping gases into the sky. The oceans are rising, and deadly disasters like wildfires, heat waves, and flooding are becoming more destructive. Almost every part of the world is experiencing the effects of climate change.

Advertisement

That much is “unequivocal,” according to the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), an international team of scientists convened by the United Nations.

What’s far less certain is just how bleak the future of our planet will be.

This critical question reaches beyond physical sciences into economics, sociology, and even psychology. Humans still have the power to slow the climate crisis — though with each day that goes by without sweeping societal changes to slash emissions, the outlook grows more grim.

Advertisement

The first installment of the IPCC’s sixth assessment report, which focuses on the physical science behind climate change, considers five scenarios that game out how humanity will respond, or not, to the specter of warming. They reveal that some of the more extreme projections of the past are less likely to come to fruition. But every scenario in the report also overshoots one of the targets of the 2015 Paris climate agreement. A best-case scenario now requires drastically more climate action than the world has achieved to date, and the window for action is closing.

However, “Scenarios are not predictions,” the report says. “Instead, they provide a ‘what-if’ investigation of the implications of various developments and actions.”

In short, these scenarios show how scientists are grappling with the capriciousness of human behavior. What happens if more countries are taken over by nationalists? Or if clean technology makes a radical leap forward? Or if countries and corporations actually start to buckle down and throttle emissions?

Advertisement

Our planet has many possible futures that depend on human decisions. These visions of tomorrow emphasize that we have profoundly and irreversibly changed the world, but also that much of the potential warming is still in our hands.

Five stories about the future of our climate, explained

Read between the many lines of the nearly 4,000-page IPCC report and you will see that it actually tells five different stories about the future, complete with their own little narratives.

Here’s the backdrop for these stories: The planet is undergoing a massive, uncontrolled experiment, rapidly revealing what happens when 2.6 million pounds of carbon dioxide per second (and still rising) are added to the atmosphere. All of humanity is participating in this experiment, whether directly contributing to it or feeling its impacts.

Advertisement

But it’s an immensely frustrating experiment because the subjects (all of us) are constantly messing with the controls. How much more Earth will warm up in the coming century hinges on what people will do. And what people are doing is changing.

It’s increasingly clear that many of the factors that helped bring the world to the current point will not persist into the future — unchecked population growth, a massive surge in coal mining, too few clean energy options. With the 2015 Paris climate agreement, countries agreed in principle to limit warming this century to less than 2°C, with an additional target of staying below 1.5°C. These goalposts didn’t exist when the IPCC put out its last comprehensive report in 2013.

And with improvements in measurement, simulations, and studies of the historical climate, researchers have a much better grasp of climate sensitivity — the range of expected warming if carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere were to double, compared to their levels in the 19th century. For decades, the best estimate for climate sensitivity ranged between 1.5°C and 4.5°C. Now scientists set the range between 2.5°C and 4°C, with 3°C as the most likely value.

Advertisement

After honing down how the planet will respond to carbon dioxide, the next step is to figure out how much carbon dioxide will be emitted. To do this, scientists have imagined how humanity will progress from here on out.

They’ve considered population growth, advances in clean energy, and an observer effect, in which alarming climate science spurs action to limit greenhouse gas emissions. Their five stories are known as shared socioeconomic pathways (SSPs), each of which makes different assumptions about shifts in policy, economics, and technology.

Here are the scenarios in the latest report:

Advertisement

1) SSP1-1.9 — This scenario has been described as “taking the green road.” It’s the most ambitious and hardest-to-achieve storyline. It envisions a gradual but concerted shift toward clean energy, with few political barriers in adapting to and mitigating climate change. This entails a rapid drawdown of fossil fuels, widespread deployment of clean energy, increasing energy efficiency, and lower resource demands. By the middle of the century, humanity will zero out its contributions to climate change.

This scenario also assumes inclusive global development that lifts all countries. It imagines improvements in education and health that would help stabilize population growth, with the total declining slightly to 7 billion people. To create this future, humans would likely need to achieve a global philosophical shift away from the pursuit of economic growth and toward improvements in human well-being.

While every scenario in the new IPCC report will likely overshoot the 1.5°C target, under SSP1-1.9, global average temperatures would eventually decline below this level by 2100. It’s also worth noting that 1.5°C of warming is no picnic; that’s still warmer than the world is today, leading to effects like increasing the frequency and intensity of heat waves and extreme rainfall.

Advertisement

 

 

Global surface temperatures vary widely under different emissions pathways.
IPCC

 

2) SSP1-2.6 — This pathway envisions that the world will eventually get its act together on climate change, but more slowly than in the optimistic path of SSP1-1.9. It envisions an economy with net-zero emissions after 2050. SSP1-2.6 also expects the global population to reach 7 billion people. The result is a world that will warm up to 1.8°C, with a likely range between 1.3°C and 2.4°C by 2100.

Advertisement

It may not seem like much, but this increase in warming compared to SSP1-1.9 has major ripple effects. Sea levels will have risen between 30 and 54 centimeters by the end of the century, up from the 24 cm of rise that has already occurred. That would inundate major coastal metropolises on a regular basis and put another 10 million people around the world at risk from coastal flooding. A world with 2°C of warming would double the number of people exposed to extreme heat compared to a 1.5°C scenario. And every additional bit of warming would bring more environmental declines and exposure to climate hazards.

3) SSP2-4.5 — Sometimes described as “middle of the road,” this scenario lines up with what countries have pledged to do so far about climate change. If every country actually fulfilled its existing obligations, their emissions would lead to about 2.7°C of warming by 2100, with a likely range between 2.1°C and 3.5°C. Under this scenario, the Arctic Ocean would likely be ice-free in the summer, which could have ripple effects on weather all over the world.

On top of the devastating effects in the first two scenarios, scientists expect that 3°C of warming would cause a significant drop in global food production, far more extreme heat, and more devastating flooding from extreme rainfall.

Advertisement

This storyline presumes that future global development patterns will not radically shift from historical trends. Inequalities will still persist between countries and development will be slow, but there will be international cooperation on environmental goals. The global population in this scenario would peak at 9.6 billion people.

4) SSP3-7.0 — In this narrative, nationalism is resurgent and countries retreat from international cooperation, focusing instead on their own economic goals. “I sort of jokingly refer to this as Trumpworld,” said Zeke Hausfather, director of climate and energy at the Breakthrough Institute and a contributing author to the latest IPCC report. “It’s a reasonable storyline for what a worst-case world could look like.”

This would lead to countries exploiting their own fossil fuels resources more. Investments in education and technological development would decline. Population growth would slow in industrialized countries but remain high in developing countries, with the total reaching 12.6 billion people. Solving climate change would become a low international priority.

Advertisement

SSP3-7.0 also accounts for high levels of heat-trapping gases, other than carbon dioxide, including aerosols and methane. By the end of the century, sea levels will have risen catastrophically — between 46 cm and 74 cm in this scenario — and the world will have warmed by roughly 3.6°C, with a range between 2.8°C and 4.6°C.

Fortunately, this scenario is on the fringes of what’s plausible, scientists say. “That’s not the world we’re heading toward right now, but it’s certainly a world you could see happening,” Hausfather said.

5) SSP5-8.5 — Imagine a world where humanity doesn’t just do nothing about climate change but continues to make it worse. This scenario envisions global economic growth across the board fueled by burning coal, oil, and natural gas, with the planet’s population leveling off at 7 billion people. While resources are devoted to adapting to climate change, there is little effort to mitigate emissions.

Advertisement

The net result would be 4.4°C of warming, with a range between 3.3°C and 5.7°C. As if large-scale coastal inundation and extremely destructive weather weren’t enough, parts of the planet would become unlivable during the hottest times of the year. This odd combination of assumptions and results makes this the most dire but one of the least plausible scenarios. However, it helps scientists probe the upper limits of their models.

Why the IPCC decided on these particular storylines

The five SSPs in the new IPCC report are sorted based on the level of “radiative forcing” — how much energy the atmosphere would trap by the end of the century, in watts per square meter. So the SSP1-1.9 pathway is expected to cause 1.9 watts per square meter of radiative forcing by 2100. Radiative forcing is directly related to how much the planet will heat up on average.

These scenarios were developed in the wake of the 2015 Paris climate agreement. That’s when nearly every country in the world agreed to limit warming this century to less than 2°C above pre-industrial levels, with a high-bar target of keeping warming below 1.5°C. SSPs consider what humans need to do to meet those goals — and they also account for changes in technology, like rapidly falling prices of renewable energy, which hadn’t yet occurred when the IPCC published its last assessment report in 2013. The low-end scenarios are meant to illustrate what would happen if the world actually did meet its climate objectives.

Advertisement

Climate models then digest the assumptions in each of these scenarios to yield estimates of how the climate will change under each one.

It’s important to remember that these scenarios are not exact forecasts of the future. The scientists who created them are not making judgments about which ones are most likely to come to pass. “We do not consider the degree of realism of any one scenario,” said Amanda Maycock, an associate professor of climate dynamics at the University of Leeds and an author of the future climate scenarios chapter, in an email. SSPs are meant to illustrate the mechanisms of climate change, factoring in human decisions that will determine the scale of the problem.

How should people plan for the future under climate change?

In all of these potential futures, climate change will continue for years to come. Decades of past pollution, and our ongoing reliance on fossil fuels, are already baked in.

Advertisement

“If we would bring down our CO2 emissions to zero today, there would be no further warming from CO2 — but of course that is impossible,” said Joeri Rogelj, director of research at the Grantham Institute at Imperial College London and an IPCC author. Even the most aggressive climate action would lead to a phase-out over time, not a sudden end to emissions. “There is only that steep a pathway we can follow until we get to zero emissions,” he added.

But humans still have the power to determine the longer-term path. Right now, the world is somewhere between scenario 3 (SSP2-4.5) and scenario 4 (SSP3-7.0).

“The five illustrative scenarios behave quite similarly over the next 20 years (2021-2040) with average global temperature anomalies differing by less than one-tenth of a degree,” said Maycock. “By mid-century (2041-2060) the scenarios start to diverge more strongly.”

Advertisement
In an aerial view, low water levels are visible at Lake Oroville on July 22, 2021 in Oroville, California.

 

 

Water levels in California’s Lake Oroville reached record lows this year amid extreme heat and a massive drought, threatening hydroelectric power production.
 

These scenarios reveal just how much of a challenge it will be for the world to change course. It will require seismic shifts across the global economy and will take years to yield results. Yet many decisions about the future (where to build homes, how much food to grow, what places are no longer livable) have to be made today. That’s where it can be useful to have a range of possibilities.

A more dire future could result from a reversal of many climate change policies currently in place. On the other hand, moving to a lower emissions trajectory would require drastic reductions in greenhouse gas emissions.

In 2018, the IPCC looked specifically at what it would take to limit warming to less than 1.5°C, the high-ambition target under the Paris climate agreement. They found that global emissions would have to plummet by more than 50 percent from where they are now by 2030. But this possibility is getting less and less likely: Since that report, greenhouse gas emissions have only grown, and atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide reached record highs.

Advertisement

The biggest obstacles to rapidly reducing warming are not laws of nature, but the modern fossil fuel-dependent economy humanity has constructed for itself. “This warming is not really because of inertia in the physical system, but rather inertia in how quickly we can bring down emissions to zero,” said Rogelj.

So how can people prepare for the future?

The most prudent course of action is to work toward the best-case scenario while preparing for some of the worst consequences of climate change.

Advertisement

The low-end scenarios, like scenario 1 (SSP1-1.9), illustrate the minimum amount of warming the world will have to endure. The middle pathways align roughly with the current trajectory of greenhouse gas emissions. The high-emissions storylines are much less likely, but they are not impossible. There could be feedback loops or tipping points in the global climate system that scientists have yet to uncover, which could accelerate warming beyond what’s expected with humanity’s emissions. So future warming past 4°C, which would lead to truly catastrophic consequences, cannot be completely ruled out.

The storylines themselves should also serve as motivation to aggressively limit climate change. The differences between them highlight that there are immense dividends for lowering greenhouse gas emissions, and severe consequences for failing to do so.

Even small increases in warming are consequential, and the impacts of climate change are already visible today in phenomena like melting ice caps, rising sea levels, and more destructive extreme weather. But the flip side is that all efforts to mitigate climate change are meaningful, even if the world overshoots its targets. All the warming that’s avoided will save lives and property and will enhance human welfare. There may be a point of no return, but there is no point at which our actions don’t matter.

Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Comentanos

WOW

The Federal Government Sells Flood-Prone Homes To Often Unsuspecting Buyers, NPR Finds

Published

on

Homes that were sold by the Department of Housing and Urban Development between January 2017 and August 2020 are in federally designated flood zones at almost 75 times the rate of all homes sold nationwide in that period. New Jersey is one hot spot. Here, flooding from Tropical Storm Henri in Helmetta, N.J., this August.
(más…)

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading

WOW

Mujercitas remezcladas, pero no reinventadas

Published

on

La portada del nuevo libro de Bethany C. Morrow, Tantos comienzos.

Advertisement

Jonathan Barkat


ocultar leyenda

Advertisement

alternar subtítulo

Jonathan Barkat

La portada del nuevo libro de Bethany C. Morrow, Tantos comienzos.

Advertisement

Jonathan Barkat

Bethany C. Morrow ya tenía varios libros de diferentes géneros publicados cuando se le pidió que considerara otro: una nueva visión del amado clásico. Pequeña mujer. Ella estuvo de acuerdo, con una condición: su libro no volvería a imaginar nada. «Sé que tan pronto como haga de las hermanas de marzo chicas negras, no voy a reinventar Pequeña mujer«, dijo,» estoy contando una historia completamente diferente «.

Lo que indica el título: So Many Beginnings: A Little Women Remix (So Many Beginnings: A Little Women Remix). Morrow, que es afroamericano, no estaba interesado en modificar la icónica novela de Louisa May Alcott sobre cuatro hermanas a mediados del siglo XIX en Nueva Inglaterra. Quería darle la vuelta por completo. Y ella lo hizo.

Advertisement

Autor Bethany C. Morrow.

Cortesía de Bethany C. Morrow


ocultar leyenda

Advertisement

alternar subtítulo

Cortesía de Bethany C. Morrow

Advertisement

Mientras que en el cuento original de Alcott, la Guerra Civil era una parte de fondo de la trama, en Tantos comienzos, la guerra y sus secuelas son fundamentales para la vida de la familia March. Las niñas de marzo y su madre (Marmee en el original, Mamita en la versión de Morrow) no son simplemente versiones en tonos sepia de los personajes de Alcott; son su propia gente, con preocupaciones que a veces se superponen con los personajes de Alcott y, a veces, van en direcciones muy diferentes.

Empecé preguntándole a Morrow, socióloga de formación, si llevaba mucho tiempo Pequeña mujer devoto, y su respuesta me sorprendió. Nuestra conversación ha sido editada para mayor claridad y extensión.

Advertisement

¿Eras una de esas personas que leían Mujercitas una y otra vez cuando eras joven, y esa fue parte de la razón por la que accediste a escribir tu nuevo libro?

Quiero comenzar diciendo que no recuerdo haber leído el original.

¿Seriamente? ¿Y no lo leíste antes de empezar a escribir?

Advertisement

No tenía intención de leerlo. Como le dije al editor, no importaría. Estoy escribiendo una historia sobre cuatro chicas negras en 1863. No importa lo que estuviera haciendo un grupo de chicas blancas; eso no tiene nada que ver con eso. Diré que yo, como mucha gente de mi edad, estaba muy enamorado de la adaptación cinematográfica de 1994, así que si hay alguna similitud, esperaría que estuviera más cerca de un par de elementos de esa película. Básicamente, Pequeña mujer Se considera ficción histórica, pero como mujer negra, me han excluido de esa narrativa. Parece el tipo de propiedad que no importa cuántas veces se vuelva a visitar, es la misma. Es para chicas blancas.

Aún así, algunas de las cosas en este nuevo libro, se mantuvieron igual. Hay cuatro hermanas. Su madre es su brújula moral, su padre está en guerra. Y hay un amigo de la familia muy lindo, un niño llamado Lorie, que figura en la historia. Meg es maestra, Jo escritora, Beth costurera y Amy, la más joven, todavía no es nada, pero quiere ser bailarina. ¿Dónde viven estas marchas?

Yo configuro mi Pequeña mujer en la Colonia de los Pueblos Liberados de las Islas Roanoke en 1863, por lo que inmediatamente se encontraba en una parte completamente diferente del país.

Advertisement

Entonces, la familia March era parte de una comunidad creada después de la emancipación, en la costa de Carolina del Norte. ¿Era la isla Roanoke la única comunidad de ese tipo?

Hubo varios esparcidos por todo el país. Uno de los más grandes, que se menciona en el libro, fue Corinth, en Mississippi. Estaba un poco más adelantado que Roanoke en términos de edad y progreso. Y era el equivalente de Black Wall Street: era rentable. Hizo exactamente lo que la Unión afirmó que esperaban que hicieran estas colonias.

Y, sin embargo, Corinto fracasó como colonia de pueblos liberados. ¿Por qué?

Advertisement

No hubo explicación para su desaparición, salvo que el Ejército de la Unión decidió «evacuarlo», que es como te das cuenta de que no te consideran libre. No se le considera una persona. Esto no se considera su hogar. No se consideró que tuvieras un Derecha a una casa porque la Unión puede simplemente evacuarla. Puede simplemente desconectar tu propia existencia. Y eso es lo que sucedió con Corinto: fue evacuado inexplicablemente cuando el campamento de la Unión se mudó.

Va en contra de la mitología del Norte como Salvador. Tu libro tiene una descripción diferente. Representas a los soldados de la Unión resentidos de ser asignados a lo que podrían llamar «deber n *****». Coerción de los hombres y mujeres liberados para trabajar a bajo costo o sin costo alguno. Condescendencia de los misioneros que vinieron a enseñar a los liberados. En un momento, Jo le dice a un misionero: «Dios no lo quiera, deberías hacer algo por todos aquí, pero no hablar ¡Para cualquiera de nosotros! ». Su arrebato es visto como muy impertinente: ¿Cómo se atreve a cuestionar sus intenciones? Los libertos tenían opiniones sobre los blancos que aparentemente los estaban ayudando, pero casi nunca vemos esta perspectiva reflejada en los libros de texto de historia, incluso en los modernos. ¿Por qué?

Por qué pensar? ¿Por qué faltaría? ¿Cómo encaja con nuestra mitología? ¡No es así! La verdad no funciona con nuestra mitología. Como niño negro, pensarías que no existimos hasta la esclavitud. Y después de la esclavitud, no volvimos a existir hasta el movimiento de derechos civiles.

Advertisement

También tiene una visión implacable de la abolición. Habla un poco sobre eso.

Realmente, desesperadamente, quería romper la mitología en torno a la palabra y el título «abolicionista». Porque acabamos de aplanar estas palabras para que sean sinónimo, de nuevo, de estos arquetipos que no suelen ser precisos. Los abolicionistas, incluso los llamados abolicionistas cristianos, estaban preocupados por despojarse del repugnante mar de la esclavitud. No con la igualdad y liberación de los afroamericanos. Expresamente no.

Ahí es donde empiezas a conseguir cosas como la Sociedad Estadounidense de Colonización, colonizando y estableciendo Liberia porque pensaron: «De acuerdo, dejemos de esclavizar porque es una mancha moral para los estadounidenses blancos. Pero una vez que hagamos eso, tendremos que deshacernos de estos negros». . «

Advertisement

Una de las partes más interesantes del libro para mí fue cómo la familia March trató a la hija menor, Amy. Todos tenían tareas asignadas para mantener la casa en funcionamiento, pero Amy no. Mammy se negó a que hiciera las tareas del hogar; ella dijo: «Déjala ser una niña». Amy es tan joven que no sabe lo que significa estar en cautiverio. Y la familia quiere que siga siendo así.

No pongo la carga de erradicar la supremacía blanca sobre las víctimas de la supremacía blanca. Pero lo que yo hacer Es la forma en que elegimos criar a nuestros hijos, la forma en que elegimos amar a nuestros hijos, es nuestra elección. Eso es importante, y me niego. me niego – ser la primera persona en romper el corazón de mi hijo.

Su libro se comercializa como literatura infantil o juvenil, pero ha abordado una serie de temas difíciles: lo que significa ser poseído. El despreocupado descuido de algunas personas blancas, incluso las bien intencionadas, hacia las personas que poseían. ¿Por qué crees que los jóvenes necesitan leer sobre estas cosas?

Advertisement

No estoy seguro de a qué edad deberíamos empezar a decir la verdad. Pero propondría que sea de inmediato.

Ha hecho un libro que está lleno de historia, en parte traumático, que todavía resuena en este momento. ¿Hiciste eso a propósito?

Fue horrible y maravilloso escribir este libro. Me encantó, fue una de las cosas más fáciles que me salió en términos del proceso de escritura. Pero era debilitante cada vez que recordaba: «Esto está ambientado en 1863». Y no tenía ganas. Pero la asombrosa yuxtaposición de este libro, creo, es que trata sobre tal terrorismo y tal horror y también es la historia más gentil que he escrito. Porque estoy enfocado en la familia, estoy enfocado en estas hermanas, estoy enfocado en el amor que se tienen el uno al otro. Y eso hace que una historia sea rica en alegría y amor y en momentos interiores personales maravillosos. Pero lidiar con el contexto y darme cuenta de que en 2021, no me siento alejado de esto en absoluto, fue muy difícil.

Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading

WOW

Alt Latino y Tiny Desk celebran el Mes Nacional de la Herencia Hispana

Published

on

Alt.Latino, el programa de NPR sobre música alternativa latina y arte y cultura latina, se está apoderando de los conciertos de escritorio Tiny Desk de NPR Music durante el Mes Nacional de la Herencia Hispana.



Advertisement

UN MARTINEZ, ANFITRIÓN:

El 15 de septiembre al 15 de octubre ha sido designado como el Mes Nacional de la Herencia Hispana, 30 días reservados para considerar las contribuciones de las diversas comunidades latinas en este país. Al podcast Latino de NPR Music le gusta decir que cada mes es el mes de la herencia. Pero reservan una programación especial. Y este año es probablemente el año más importante hasta el momento.

Felix Contreras es el presentador y productor del podcast. Y está aquí para contarnos más sobre eso. Bienvenido.

Advertisement

FELIX CONTRERAS, BYLINE: Gracias, hombre.

MARTINEZ: De acuerdo. ¿Qué estás haciendo para celebrar este año?

CONTRERAS: OK, en primer lugar, conciertos de Tiny Desk. Y los músicos latinos que han tocado el Tiny Desk han comenzado a llamarlo El Tiny.

Advertisement

MARTINEZ: (Risas).

CONTRERAS: Entonces estamos haciendo una adquisición de El Tiny – todo el mes, toda la música latina, diez artistas diferentes, diferentes géneros y estilos y al menos ocho países y culturas diferentes. El equipo Alt.Latino y el equipo de conciertos de Tiny Desk han creado una mezcla con algo para todos. Tenemos algunos A-listers. Tenemos algunas bandas a mitad de carrera que más gente debería conocer y algunas nuevas bandas de descubrimiento.

MARTINEZ: Adquisición de El Tiny, me encanta. Está bien. ¿Podemos escuchar algunos ejemplos de eso a través de algunos de los artistas que han alineado para El Tiny?

Advertisement

CONTRERAS: OK. Ahora, mencioné una variedad de países y culturas. Bueno, esta semana tenemos dos artistas de Colombia. Pero el primer artista es más un fenómeno global con raíces colombianas. Hoy comenzaremos con el músico de reggaetón J Balvin. Es una de las estrellas de la música pop más populares del planeta: miles de millones de visitas a YouTube y clics en el servicio de transmisión. Va a ser nuestro primer artista. Esta es una pista de su nuevo álbum, «Jose». Es una de las canciones que interpreta en su concierto en casa de Tiny Desk.

(SONIDO DE LA CANCIÓN, «QUE LOCURA»)

J BALVIN: (Cantando en español).

Advertisement

MARTINEZ: Ahora, para aquellos que no están familiarizados con el reguetón, ¿y cómo no estarlo en este momento?

CONTRERAS: (Risas).

MARTINEZ: Es – bueno, hablo en serio – quiero decir, entonces, ¿qué estamos escuchando?

Advertisement

CONTRERAS: OK – la historia en miniatura del reguetón. Se originó en Panamá con afropanameños, se incubó un poco más en Puerto Rico, donde se convirtió en el principal medio de expresión de los puertorriqueños negros que habían quedado marginados en la sociedad puertorriqueña. Ahora, dé un gran paso adelante en esta línea de tiempo. Ahora, al igual que el hip-hop, el ritmo y el estilo se han vuelto populares en toda América Latina y en Colombia en particular. J Balvin representa cómo esa popularidad se ha vuelto panlatina.

MARTINEZ: Excelente manera de comenzar esto, está bien. Mencionaste otra banda colombiana.

CONTRERAS: OK. Diamante Electrico ha sido descrito como una banda de rock. Son los ganadores de tres Latin Grammy, dos veces al mejor álbum de rock. Pero su alcance es bastante amplio. Utilizan el rock como base, pero tienen influencias del funk y otros estilos. Este es su tema «Sueltame, Bogota», que también se presenta en su concierto de Tiny Desk.

Advertisement

(SONIDO DE LA CANCIÓN, «SUELTAME, BOGOTA»)

DIAMANTE ELECTRICO: (Canto en español).

CONTRERAS: Sabes, una de las cosas que queremos hacer con esta serie y lo que hacemos en Alt.Latino es romper ideas preconcebidas que la gente pueda tener sobre el gusto musical de los latinos aquí en este país y en América Latina. Como en cualquier otro lugar, escuchamos de todo, desde rock hasta soul, electrónica, experimental y folclórica. Es un gusto muy ecléctico. Y hay músicos y bandas que reflejan esa variedad. Y eso es lo que intentamos hacer en el programa. Y eso es lo que vamos a hacer con la adquisición de El Tiny.

Advertisement

MARTINEZ: Y Félix, siempre he dicho que somos la demo más difícil de identificar, especialmente musicalmente.

CONTRERAS: Absolutamente, hombre, quiero decir, en América Latina, por supuesto, no lo llaman música latina.

MARTINEZ: Sí.

Advertisement

(LA RISA)

CONTRERAS: Se refieren a él como … son específicos de género …

MARTINEZ: Sí.

Advertisement

CONTRERAS: … Hip-hop, electrónica, música dance, etc.

MARTINEZ: Felix Contreras es el presentador del podcast Alt.Latino de NPR Music. Están celebrando el Mes de la Herencia Hispana con una adquisición especial de Tiny Desk: cuatro podcasts, entrevistas en vivo y videos explicativos musicales en Instagram y listas de reproducción en Spotify y Apple Music. Felix, gracias.

CONTRERAS: De nada.

Advertisement

(SONIDO DE LA CANCIÓN DE DIAMENTE ELECTRICO, «SUELTAME, BOGOTA»)

Copyright © 2021 NPR. Reservados todos los derechos. Visite las páginas de términos de uso y permisos de nuestro sitio web en www.npr.org para obtener más información.

Verb8tm, Inc., un contratista de NPR, crea las transcripciones de NPR en una fecha límite urgente, y las produce mediante un proceso de transcripción patentado desarrollado con NPR. Este texto puede no estar en su forma final y puede ser actualizado o revisado en el futuro. La precisión y la disponibilidad pueden variar. El registro autorizado de la programación de NPR es el registro de audio.

Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading

Facebook

¿Búscas empleo?

Videos

Lo más visto