Connect with us

WOW

How Santigold Helped Me Claim And Keep My New York Dreams

Published

on

Santigold’s self-titled debut combines «look what I can do» attitude with a galvanizing magic.

NPR Music’s Turning the Tables is a project envisioned to challenge sexist and exclusionary conversations about musical greatness. Up until now we have focused on overturning conventional, patriarchal best-of lists and histories of popular music. But this time, it’s personal. For 2021, we’re digging into our own relationships to the records we love, asking: How do we know as listeners when a piece of music is important to us? How do we break free of institutional pressures on our taste while still taking the lessons of history into account? What does it mean to make a truly personal canon? The essays in this series will excavate our unique relationships with the albums we love, from unimpeachable classics by major stars to subcultural gamechangers and personal revelations. Because the way that certain music comes to hold a central place in our lives isn’t just a reflection of how we develop our taste, but how we come to our perspective on the world.

Advertisement

It’s been 20 years since I first heard a song from the mind of Santi White, but at the time I fell in love with it I didn’t know I had her to thank. Back then White lived not in the spotlight but mostly in liner notes and underground scenes, a Black woman grinding, like so many before her, to make a name for herself in the music industry. Her final form — Santigold, the genre-defying heroine who’d later burn bright in my consciousness — was not yet a glimmer.

In those early days of 2001, who I did know was her Philly friend Res (a singer whose debut album, it so happens, White largely wrote and produced). I’d managed to get my hands on How I Do months before it was officially out — one perk of dating the man for whom I’d recently moved to New York City. He was a music journalist with bylines in glossies like Vibe and Spin, a Queens-born hip-hop head. At the countless shows we saw Res open for Talib Kweli or Mos Def over the years — me tagging along as my man’s plus-one, because my unglamorous gig slapping HTML around website copy could never get us on any guest list — I watched him nod hard to the bass-heavy tracks, and like a good girlfriend, I nodded yes too.

But my favorite — that song I fell for fast — was How I Do‘s opener, «Golden Boys.» I loved its sound — Res’ voice alternately sneering and soaring over music that, foreshadowing Santigold’s own mashed-up aesthetic, couldn’t be pinned as alt- or neo- or whatever prefix you tried to give it. And then there were the lyrics, written by White — a rebuke of deceptive images and false idols. «Why are you selling dreams of who you wish you could be?» she scolds in the very first line, putting on blast a nameless «prince in all of the magazines.» The coldest read comes at the chorus, though, courtesy of a sisterhood side-eyeing this prince from the corners:

Advertisement

But then there’s girls like me who sit appalled by what we’ve seen
We know the truth about you…

I remember hearing these lines the first time, the synths swelling in the background, the beat picking up. Those «girls like me,» that all-knowing «we»: They begged me to sing along, so I did. Was I cool enough to hang out on this scene, though, savvy enough to float free of its traps? Ask me today, with the benefit of hindsight, and I will assure you that back then, I was far from qualified. On some level, you might even accuse me of poseur tendencies too. Trailing behind a man, after all, wasn’t exactly the feminist move.

But if you’d asked me back then? When I was 24 years old and high on the bravado that even a nascent version of Santigold could stir in me? Well. For that runtime of 4 minutes and 38 seconds, you couldn’t tell me jack.

***

Advertisement

The exact details of my first dalliance with Santigold elude me — probably because when it arrived, in 2008, it instantly felt ubiquitous. (Technically, back then, the album was called Santogold, as was the artist – but both have been known as Santigold following a name change in 2009.) I heard «Creator» playing in the bars that my man and I frequented on the Lower East Side; I glimpsed her name in bold while flipping through the Fader or scrolling on Pitchfork, any number of those buzzy outlets obsessed with the new and the next; who knows, I probably even posted critic Leah Greenblatt’s capsule review of the album on EW.com (where I worked at the time). When I nabbed my own copy I got a good look at its cover, connecting the sounds and the name I recognized with the image of the artist behind them. Imprinting, almost. And sis glared back at me, 100 percent grit — the only glam thing about her the gold glitter spewing out of her mouth. Whoa, I remember thinking, what’s the story here?

I discovered, to my delight, that Santi White and I had a lot in common. Both of us Black women, of course, and both 32 that year — the wrong age, race and gender to just be making a name, especially as creatives in youth-obsessed New York City. Like me, I’d learn from the profiles I’d dig into as companion pieces to my regular listening, she had paid dues behind the scenes before trying out for the showier roles (though her days in A&R and fronting a punk band called Stiffed were obviously more exciting than mine toggling between media jobs). Also like me, she was musically ravenous. Her skinfolk had steeped her in a love of traditionally Black forms — jazz and soul, then Afrobeat, dub — but she was interested too in other genres beloved by the weird white kids she’d befriended in school (among favorites she’s cited: Devo, Siouxsie and the Banshees, the Pixies, David Byrne). At some point she’d mustered the gall to mix it all up, and in her stew of an album I recognized a freedom, a flouting: the soul of Black folk banging alongside punks, pop idols, knob-twiddlers, new wavers. I thought about the long stretch of time between her start in the business and this inspiring moment, and sensed that art this accomplished, this sure, couldn’t have come on any other wavelength or timeline. Considering our similarities, I held her success very close to my heart.

Advertisement

Amid all the incredible music coming out of New York in the aughts, her style and perspective spoke the loudest to me. Lyrically, much of Santigold carried the swagger of the hip-hop I loved (from «Creator»: «Tell me no, I say yes, I was chosen / And I will deliver the explosion»), but minus the misogyny that often stopped me cold on the dance floor. And though the era’s resurgent rock & rollers like the Strokes and the Yeah Yeah Yeahs sparked electric, channeling the city’s jittery energy, for me Santigold’s debut was funnier, sharper. She had a mean eye-roll, reserved for the city’s suckas and the indignities of competing against them («L.E.S. Artistes,» «Shove It,» «Starstruck»). But a wink was there too, in her stories of overcoming doubt («My Superman»), cops and robbers («Unstoppable»), even power outages («Lights Out»).

 

Advertisement

YouTube

The album has big «look what I can do» attitude, and in that way it speaks to the New York dream of looming exceptional — one singular sensation — above the masses. And yet what is this city without its people, without the connections you make on your way to the top? To that point, some of Santigold’s songs have a galvanizing magic too. There’s the «us» in battle on «You’ll Find a Way» («Can’t pull us under/ You better watch out, run for cover»), but the most famous example opens «Shove It»: Seven years after the Res song that invited me to be cooler and smarter than I actually was, Santi White dropped another meaningful «we»— Brooklyn, we go hard — and the phrase was so rousing, such a rallying cry, that Kanye West built a whole banger around it for Jay-Z.

By the year of Santigold the man and I repped the borough of Brooklyn too, capping a years-long Goldilocks hop around the city (our new garden apartment in Fort Greene was heaven, following stints living in cab-sparse Queens and stodgy Midtown Manhattan). I should say that along the way we’d tied the knot, in a DIY wedding-slash-cocktail party that, thanks to a reporter friend, made half a page of the Daily News. Finally settled among so many striving, thriving Black folks — this was, of course, just at the tipping point of gentrification — it finally felt like our «we» was expanding. The streets exploded with joy on Election Night, impromptu dance parties right outside our windows to celebrate the new President who looked like us, and I had never felt such a strong connection to my adopted home.

Advertisement

At work I got promoted a few times by editing other people’s stories, but still I dreamed of writing my own — a novel one day, if I could figure out how to hone my hustle. In the meantime, I took a few workshops in the West Village on Saturdays, trading amateur short fiction with other aspiring artists, and on occasional Sundays I joined a group of girlfriends for book club. All of them were girls like me, transplants to the city with blooming careers and ambition to spare. We read E.L. Doctorow and Ntozake Shange, and argued about them over brunch. We lovingly dubbed ourselves the «Army of Bad B******,» and hyped each other up for the Mondays ahead.

***

In 2012, Santigold dropped a new album, Master of My Make-Believe, but at the time I was too busy to get into it. I had just started a new role as an executive editor at a media brand — still not working on a novel or even short stories anymore, though I tried to justify proximity to writing as close enough. I didn’t have room in my brain for much of anything else (except TV, my sedative at the end of the day). The only new music I heard was in the background of prestige dramas or car commercials. The dreamer inside me, dying.

Advertisement

On the surface, my life gleamed. Down South, my family was so proud of my climb that my mother framed and mounted on a wall of her house the masthead of a magazine where my name sat two lines away from the top. And in Brooklyn, the husband and I bought a new-construction condo down the street in Bed-Stuy, the down payment and later the mortgage drawn from my salary (since he’d quit his own day job to write movies on spec). The pressure was unreal, but wasn’t I up for it? Wasn’t leveling up the entire point? I imagine if I had listened to Santigold then, her effect might have been different. What I needed, what I wanted, more than a jolt of confidence to grow into the woman I wanted to be, was confirmation I’d conquered New York.

Advertisement

But by summer 2013, what I’d assumed was gold turned a sickening green. At work, budgets shrank even tighter, and I resented wielding the hatchet come layoff time, resented my days reduced to numbers I could never make work. Meanwhile, at home, the husband expressed, in various hurtful ways, that this whole marriage thing just wasn’t his jam. In the end I kept the condo, and the increasingly agonizing job that paid for it. I still had my Army of Bad B****** and they rallied around me whenever they could, but many of them had children now and/or their own stressful careers. So I spent much of my time off alone, wandering aimlessly, bitterly down Bedford Avenue.

Eventually on those walks, I did listen to music again — my old favorites, Santigold among them. The confidence I remembered was still intact, but now, in songs like «L.E.S. Artistes,» my heart perked up at the earnestness, the desire glinting through disillusion:

I can say I hope it will be worth what I give up
If I could stand up mean for the things that I believe
Change, change, ch-change, change
I want to get up out of my skin

«I’d had this psychic reading,» Santi White would later tell Mark Ronson in a 2021 interview, recalling the time before her breakthrough. «And she’s like, ‘Well, you’re going to get where you want to get to, but it’s going to take longer because you just got to let go of wanting to get to a certain place and just make music for the sake of making music.’»

Advertisement

At my own crossroads, I had no such visions into my future. No clue yet that I could succeed on different terms, in more satisfying ways, or that it would take leaving New York for a while to get there. I would tap my savings and every ounce of courage to quit that big job, immersing myself in writing until it became not a dream but my purpose, my mission; until I had a whole novel centering a Black woman rock idol that Santi White might have admired the same way I’d always admired her. I would not know that this book would attract an agent, or sell to a publisher, or that anyone would even care to read the passion project of a 45-year-old woman. I, like Santigold, would learn to make art for the sake of art, and I would never feel more free.

But that wandering summer, I was afraid. The only thing I knew, by instinct, was to listen to the arsenal of what I still had: a voice, a heart and just enough faith.

So I put one foot in front of the other. Ran back the track, started over again.

Advertisement

Dawnie Walton is author of the 2021 novel The Final Revival of Opal & Nev, longlisted for the Brooklyn Library Literary Prize and praised by the New York Times as «a packed time capsule that doubles as a stick of dynamite.»

Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Comentanos

WOW

Harris y Buttigieg viajan a Carolina del Norte para promover el plan de infraestructura de Biden

Published

on

Los antiguos rivales presidenciales fueron a Charlotte para promover la ley de infraestructura. También se defendieron de una mayor charla sobre cómo los bajos índices de aprobación del presidente podrían afectar su futuro.



Advertisement

NOEL KING, ANFITRIÓN:

La vicepresidenta Kamala Harris y el secretario de Transporte, Pete Buttigieg, salieron a la carretera ayer. Estaban en Charlotte para promover la ley de infraestructura, y Scott Detrow de NPR estuvo de viaje.

SCOTT DETROW, BYLINE: Primero eliminemos la política. El presidente Biden tiene 79 años. Sus índices de aprobación se han hundido y se han mantenido hundidos. Así que últimamente hay mucha más especulación sobre si intentaría un segundo mandato, a pesar de que Biden dice que lo hará, y si no, si Harris y Buttigieg terminarían compitiendo entre sí nuevamente. En Air Force Two, Buttigieg lo descartó todo.

Advertisement

(SONIDO SINCRÓNICO DE LA GRABACIÓN ARCHIVADA)

PETE BUTTIGIEG: Estamos en 2021, y el objetivo de las campañas y las elecciones es que cuando van bien, puedes gobernar y nosotros estamos enfocados directamente en el trabajo que tenemos entre manos.

DETROW: Toda la charla llega en un momento en que varios miembros clave del personal de Harris se van. En Charlotte, Harris no quiso hablar sobre si está tratando de cambiar las cosas.

Advertisement

(SONIDO SINCRÓNICO DE LA GRABACIÓN ARCHIVADA)

VICEPRESIDENTE KAMALA HARRIS: Sí. Siguiente pregunta (risas).

DETROW: En cambio, se centró en su tarea: hablar sobre la inversión de la nueva ley en el transporte público. Ella y Buttigieg viajaron en un autobús eléctrico.

Advertisement

(SONIDO SINCRÓNICO DE LA GRABACIÓN ARCHIVADA)

HARRIS: ¿Por qué te encantan los frenos? ¿Qué te encanta de los descansos?

PERSONA NO IDENTIFICADA: Donde los frenos – aquí mismo. Tu solo …

Advertisement

HARRIS: ¿Simplemente lo tocas?

PERSONA NO IDENTIFICADA: Simplemente tóquelo.

HARRIS: Y antes tenías que esforzarte mucho.

Advertisement

DETROW: Se sentó al volante …

(SONIDO DE LA BOCINA DEL AUTOBÚS)

DETROW: … Y toca la bocina. Harris dijo que los sistemas de tránsito de Estados Unidos son demasiado viejos y demasiado lentos.

Advertisement

(SONIDO SINCRÓNICO DE LA GRABACIÓN ARCHIVADA)

HARRIS: Y las personas que usan el transporte público para sus desplazamientos a menudo pasan mucho más tiempo en tránsito, tiempo que podrían estar pasando con sus amigos y familiares.

DETROW: Mientras Harris se enfocó en la nueva ley, Buttigieg hizo hincapié en elogiar a Harris por ayudar a que se aprobara. Habló de una reunión clave con legisladores.

Advertisement

(SONIDO SINCRÓNICO DE LA GRABACIÓN ARCHIVADA)

BUTTIGIEG: En el momento justo, habló el vicepresidente. Y su mensaje fue sobre la necesidad de pensar en grande, no perderse en los detalles de la política, sino recordar la naturaleza única de la oportunidad que tenemos frente a nosotros.

DETROW: ¿Sus próximas oportunidades? Promover ese próximo gran proyecto de ley de gastos todavía está estancado en el Congreso y cambiar la suerte política de la administración Biden.

Advertisement

Scott Detrow, NPR News, Charlotte.

(SONIDO SINCRÓNICO DEL «GRAN JEFE CON UNA CORONA DE ORO» DE MATT JORGENSEN)

Copyright © 2021 NPR. Reservados todos los derechos. Visite las páginas de términos de uso y permisos de nuestro sitio web en www.npr.org para obtener más información.

Advertisement

Verb8tm, Inc., un contratista de NPR, crea las transcripciones de NPR en una fecha límite urgente, y se producen mediante un proceso de transcripción patentado desarrollado con NPR. Este texto puede no estar en su forma final y puede ser actualizado o revisado en el futuro. La precisión y la disponibilidad pueden variar. El registro autorizado de la programación de NPR es el registro de audio.

Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading

WOW

La locura del arte NFT llega a Miami Art Basel

Published

on

David Folkenflik de NPR habla con la periodista artística Sophie Haigney sobre la popularidad del arte de NFT en Art Basel en Miami este año.



Advertisement

DAVID FOLKENFLIK, PRESENTADOR:

La obra de Broadway «Art» se centró en una pintura que era solo un lienzo blanco, quiero decir totalmente blanco, con algunas líneas pintadas de blanco. La obra se vendió por una fortuna. Los lazos entre tres amigos se deshilacharon por la pregunta en el centro de la obra. ¿Eso fue arte? Esta semana, artistas, creadores de tendencias y coleccionistas de todo el mundo se están mezclando en Miami Beach para disfrutar de la exuberante tarifa conocida como Art Basel Miami. Gran parte de la emoción se centra en el arte NFT, un tipo de arte digital que normalmente se compra con criptomonedas. NFT significa tokens no fungibles. Cada artículo a la venta es una imagen digital con una huella digital única. Y al igual que la pintura de la obra «Arte», los NFT están atando el mundo del arte en nudos. ¿Podría NFT representar algo nuevo y caprichoso? Para ayudar a arrojar luz, nos dirigimos a Sophie Haigney. Es una periodista que escribe sobre arte visual y tecnología, y nos ayudará a comprender por qué se está volviendo tan popular. Hola, Sophie. Gracias por acompañarme.

SOPHIE HAIGNEY: Hola, David. Gracias por invitarme.

Advertisement

FOLKENFLIK: Me gustaría comenzar con una pregunta muy simple. ¿Qué es el arte NFT?

HAIGNEY: Entonces, los NFT son básicamente activos únicos que se verifican mediante blockchain. Y así, la cadena de bloques funciona como un libro de contabilidad público, una especie de registro de transacciones y brinda a los compradores una prueba de autenticidad o propiedad. Más simplemente, me gusta pensar en las NFT casi como certificados digitales de propiedad de una cosa en particular. Por ejemplo, una foto, un tweet, un archivo de audio pueden tener este tipo de certificado de propiedad adjunto. Y, por tanto, no estás comprando la cosa en sí. Estás comprando la prueba de poseer algo.

FOLKENFLIK: Así que recuérdanos algunas de las famosas obras de arte de NFT y quizás algunas de las más infames. Está diciendo que un tweet o una representación digital de un tweet con su certificado de autenticación subyacente es un objeto del arte NFT. ¿Cuáles son algunos otros?

Advertisement

HAIGNEY: En marzo pasado, un artista conocido como Beeple, cuyo nombre real es Mike Winkelmann, vendió un collage digital en Christie’s por más de $ 69 millones.

FOLKENFLIK: Sesenta y nueve millones de dólares.

HAIGNEY: Sí. Ese es el tercer precio más alto jamás alcanzado por un artista vivo en Christie’s. Así que eso es realmente importante. Y creo que fue entonces cuando el mundo del arte empezó a darse cuenta de esto. Además, el pasado mes de marzo, 621 zapatillas virtuales. Entonces, las imágenes de zapatillas se vendieron por un total de $ 3 millones.

Advertisement

FOLKENFLIK: Entonces, todas las ideas sobre el arte son fundamentalmente subjetivas. Mucha gente recordará que había un plátano pegado a la pared con cinta adhesiva. Se vendió por 120.000 dólares en Art Basel en 2019. En ese caso, el artista es conocido como un bromista. Todavía fue por 120k.

HAIGNEY: Sí.

FOLKENFLIK: Y las propias NFT pueden venderse por enormes cantidades de criptomonedas valoradas en cientos de miles de dólares reales. ¿La gente piensa en esto como una reserva de valor que es una especie de vehículo a través del cual estaciona dinero y es esencialmente una inversión que se apreciará con el tiempo?

Advertisement

HAIGNEY: Creo que hay mucha gente que está comprando NFT porque es una inversión especulativa. Y la gente está emocionada por gastar su criptomoneda en algo y luego cambiarla por un montón más de criptomonedas en unos pocos meses. Y luego creo que hay otro grupo de coleccionistas que están realmente entusiasmados con el arte digital y les encanta la estética. Creo que hay personas en él por diferentes razones, pero definitivamente hay un gran grupo de personas que están en él porque piensan que estas cosas se van a apreciar.

FOLKENFLIK: Bueno, ¿qué significa para los NFT que esta obra de arte no tradicional se lleve a lugares más tradicionales? Creo que más de una docena de eventos en Miami los incorporarán de una forma u otra esta semana.

HAIGNEY: Creo que esto es realmente emocionante para los artistas digitales porque durante mucho tiempo es muy, muy difícil monetizar el arte digital. Quiero decir, no puedes vender fácilmente una imagen que hayas dibujado en tu computadora. Y me ha sorprendido e interesado mucho la medida en que el mundo del arte institucional lo ha adoptado por completo. Me fascina. Y mucho de eso tiene que ver con el dinero. Creo que Christie’s y Sotheby’s están entusiasmados de poder vender obras por muchos millones de dólares. Pero también creo que son … es la primera vez que creo que muchas de estas instituciones se toman realmente en serio las obras de arte basadas en la tecnología. Y eso es emocionante para mí. Y creo que es emocionante para muchos artistas que han estado trabajando en la esfera digital durante mucho tiempo.

Advertisement

HAIGNEY: Así que hace un poco más de 90 años, ¿verdad? – Rene Magritte, pintor surrealista, pinta una pipa. Y es una representación muy realista de una pipa. Y en la parte inferior y en letras dice, en francés, esto no es una pipa. La pintura vuelve locos a los críticos. Vuelve loco al público. Pero él estaba llegando a este punto interesante, creo, me parece décadas después acerca de la representación, el arte y la realidad. ¿Cuáles son algunos de los conceptos interesantes que los artistas están explorando de esta manera en la medida en que los hay?

FOLKENFLIK: Creo que muchos artistas que trabajan en la esfera de NFT están jugando con todo el concepto de representación, la realidad. ¿Qué es real? ¿Qué es falso? ¿Qué significa ser auténtico? Hubo una obra de arte que realmente me gustó de este artista que se llama Damien Thirst. Muchos de estos artistas tienen una especie de seudónimos de Internet.

HAIGNEY: Damien Thirst, una obra de teatro sobre Damien Hirst. Estaba intentando vender este NFT. Era solo un cuadrado azul, y era un homenaje al «Monocromo azul» de Eve Klein. Y creo que parte de eso fue burlarse de la idea de que estas pinturas que consideramos originales y auténticas ahora se pueden replicar en la esfera digital y se pueden vender especulativamente por cientos de miles de dólares. Así que creo que hay muchos artistas que, como Magritte, se involucran conscientemente con la forma de la NFT y se burlan un poco de toda la burbuja especulativa y que las afirmaciones que estas NFT hacen de ser auténticas y originales. obras.

Advertisement

FOLKENFLIK: Entonces, ¿qué tan interesado estaría el típico coleccionista de arte que en años pasados ​​se dirigió a Miami Beach para Art Basel estar interesado en estos o qué tipo de inversionista de arte fresco podría dibujar en su lugar?

HAIGNEY: Creo que las galerías y las casas de subastas están realmente entusiasmadas porque han encontrado una clase completamente nueva de coleccionistas, tal vez alguien más joven que normalmente no compraba arte y que está realmente entusiasmado con los NFT específicamente. Y entonces creo que hay un subconjunto completamente nuevo de personas que van a comprar NFT en Basilea o en cualquier otra feria de arte. Pero también he estado hablando con algunas personas en las casas de subastas que dicen que los coleccionistas tradicionales se están entusiasmando cada vez más con la idea de los NFT. Me ha sorprendido mucho que el coleccionista de arte tradicional haya decidido apostar también por los NFT.

FOLKENFLIK: ¿Entonces una moda pasajera o posiblemente aquí para quedarse?

Advertisement

HAIGNEY: Creo que los NFT llegaron para quedarse. Creo que, como la pintura de Magritte, esto no es una pipa, creo que hacen que mucha gente se enoje mucho. Y creo que parte de eso se debe a los precios insanos que estamos viendo en este momento. Creo que la gente no puede creer que alguien esté dispuesto a pagar 69 millones de dólares por una imagen digital. Pero creo que, como formulario, los NFT llegaron para quedarse. Y creo que seguiremos viendo qué pasa y qué hacen los artistas con la forma.

FOLKENFLIK: Sophie Haigney es crítica y periodista que escribe sobre arte visual y tecnología. Sophie, muchas gracias por acompañarnos hoy.

HAIGNEY: Gracias.

Advertisement

Copyright © 2021 NPR. Reservados todos los derechos. Visite las páginas de términos de uso y permisos de nuestro sitio web en www.npr.org para obtener más información.

Verb8tm, Inc., un contratista de NPR, crea las transcripciones de NPR en una fecha límite urgente, y se producen mediante un proceso de transcripción patentado desarrollado con NPR. Este texto puede no estar en su forma final y puede ser actualizado o revisado en el futuro. La precisión y la disponibilidad pueden variar. El registro autorizado de la programación de NPR es el registro de audio.

Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading

WOW

‘Wait Wait’ para el 4 de diciembre de 2021: con Audra McDonald, invitada de Not My Job

Published

on

El programa de esta semana se grabó de forma remota con el presentador Peter Sagal, el juez oficial y anotador Bill Kurtis, la invitada de Not My Job Audra McDonald y los panelistas Adam Burke, Karen Chee y Maz Jobrani. Haga clic en el enlace de audio de arriba para escuchar todo el espectáculo.

Advertisement

Nicholas Hunt / Getty Images

Audra McDonald se presenta en el Lincoln Center de Nueva York el 26 de abril de 2017.

Nicholas Hunt / Getty Images

Advertisement

¿Quién es Bill esta vez?
Muévete, Delta; No preste atención al médico detrás de la cortina; El documental largo y sinuoso

Preguntas del panel
Canadá salva el desayuno

Fanfarronear al oyente
Nuestros panelistas cuentan tres historias sobre encubrimientos expuestos, solo una de las cuales es cierta.

Advertisement

No es mi trabajo: Audra McDonald en Burger King
Audra McDonald, ganadora de un Emmy, un Grammy y seis premios Tony, es una leyenda tanto del teatro como de la pantalla. Veremos si puede agregar un premio más a su estante jugando nuestro juego llamado «¡Oye, McDonald, prueba un Whopper!»

Preguntas del panel
No tire al bebé con el sofá; Nidos vacíos toman vuelo

Limericks
Bill Kurtis lee tres limericks relacionados con las noticias: Conversaciones con Randos; Chozas de salchichas; ¡y relájate el labio, asistentes al concierto!

Advertisement

Relámpago rellena el espacio en blanco
Todas las novedades no cabían en ningún otro lado.

Predicciones
Nuestros panelistas predicen qué escenas eliminadas se revelarán de ese documental de los Beatles.

Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading

Facebook

¿Búscas empleo?

Videos

Lo más visto