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Marty Baron on truth, democracy, and the press in an age of distrust

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Is the American press broken?

I’ve been asking some variation of this question for the last four years and my answer, more often than not, is yes. The Trump era exposed some core pathologies in American journalism, and it’s not just the commercial incentives driving coverage (that’s been a problem for a long time). It’s also the reality of the internet and social media and all the ways they have transformed how we consume — and therefore practice — politics.

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So I decided to talk to Marty Baron, who recently retired from the Washington Post after serving as executive editor since 2013. Baron came to the Post after a long and storied career in the business. Most famously, he oversaw the Boston Globe’s reporting on the sexual abuse scandal within the Catholic Church (which was later turned into the Oscar-winning film Spotlight). And he was at the helm of the Post as it transitioned into the digital era.

Now that he’s stepped away and had some time to reflect, not just on what he did at the Post but also on our profession more generally, I wanted to discuss what has gone wrong, and why I think the problems we’re facing might be deeper than he wants to believe.

You can hear our entire conversation (as always, there’s much more) in this week’s episode of Vox Conversations. A transcript, edited for length and clarity, follows.

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Editor’s note, August 9, 6 pm: This interview was recorded prior to a discrimination lawsuit brought in July by Washington Post reporter Felicia Sonmez against the paper and past and current leaders, including Baron.


Sean Illing

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In the world of journalism and academia, there are more or less two camps over the last four years. There are those who think American democracy is flawed but stable, and ultimately resilient. Then there are those who say, “This is a fire alarm.” Where are you on that spectrum at the moment, Marty?

Marty Baron

I guess I am somewhere in between. I think there are enormous concerns right now about the future of our democracy. I think it’s shown itself to be more fragile and more vulnerable than we have ever imagined. On the other hand, I’d like to keep in mind that our democracy has been tested in ways that were more grave than what we’ve seen over the last four or five years. We had a civil war in this country. I maintain confidence that we’ll get through this, but I think that we’re encountering some severe threats to democracy today. Particularly the challenge to truth, the questioning of objective reality.

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Sean Illing

Trump is sort of the elephant in the room there, so let’s just start right there. You said recently that you were proud of how you covered the Trump administration. I’m curious, what are you especially proud of?

Marty Baron

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Well, look, I think part of the job of a news organization like the Post is to hold government to account. Particularly if they’re not telling the truth. There were a lot of falsehoods, a lot of lies. A lot of misinformation and disinformation over the course of the previous administration. I think some of that is true of any administration, but it was taken to a degree that we had never seen before in this country. I am proud of how we kept faith with the truth, notwithstanding the attacks that we came under.

Sean Illing

You also said that “We’re not at war” — we being the media, or the Washington Post — “We’re not at war with the administration, we’re at work.” I’m curious about what you meant there as well. Obviously there are a lot of Trump voters who disagree with that.

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Marty Baron

Well, it’s not just Trump voters that seem to disagree with that. But I don’t think that I am deluding myself. The Trump administration wanted us to be seen as the opposition party. I think we have to be careful not to become the opposition party. Our job is to report the facts, put them in proper context, tell people what’s going on in an unflinching and honest and honorable way. That is not engaging in war, that is just doing our work. We do that work regardless of the administration.

Sean Illing

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A lot of us in this business did not want to accept that adversarial role, but I’m not sure we had a choice. We were thrust into that by virtue of doing the job, which is to say the truth as best we see it. We were going to be an oppositional force to someone like Trump, who was invested in lies. Is that the wrong way to see it?

Marty Baron

People have talked about the adversarial relationship between the press and government and politicians for a long time. I would say that we found ourselves in an adversarial relationship perhaps more frequently with the Trump administration.

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Sean Illing

You were just saying a minute ago that journalists kind of held the line and stood firm against this assault on objective fact, on reality, really. I know what you mean, but I’m curious if you think the work that you did, the work that any of us did, really mattered in the way we wanted it to matter.

Marty Baron

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I do think it mattered, first of all. Because the best work was well done and was truthful, and kept faith with the facts, with objective reality. Whether people were willing to accept that or not is another matter. There’s a lot of distrust in the press and mainstream media. I think it’s a huge challenge for society as a whole, the fact that people are unwilling to accept basic facts. But I think our work mattered. I also think that we need to keep the long term in mind.

I look back at Watergate, and the press was accused of a lot of the same things that it’s been accused of over the last four or five years. But it turned out that the work of the press was validated. That took some time. I think we can’t be impatient. The work that we’ve done will be validated. By the way, a lot of it already has been.

Sean Illing

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I’ll just put my cards on the table here and let you reflect however you want, because you’re probably in a better position than I am to reflect on these things. I have felt personally like the work I tried to do didn’t really matter all that much. And the work that a lot of us tried to do really didn’t matter all that much. Because for me, a journalistic project committed to the defense of truth is only successful, or maybe meaningful is the right word there, if it creates a world in which lying is costly. In which the tendency of powerful people to lie is at least checked. If that’s the measure, I feel like I failed and a lot of us failed.

Marty Baron

If that’s how we feel, then we should just all give it up, and I don’t believe in giving up. We live in a period, we live in a time, where people expect things with results. I think that creates unreasonable expectations on our part. I’m willing to be more patient. Can it be frustrating? Sure, but I don’t think we should be defeatist and I don’t think you should be defeatist.

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Sean Illing

I was thinking about Glenn Kessler, the fact-checker for the Washington Post, who famously documented the 20,000 lies that Trump had told over the course of his presidency and campaign. Obviously all that fact-checking wasn’t a deterrent. Were we not just sort of banging our heads against the wall here?

Marty Baron

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Well, I would say it takes time. I mean, go back and look at the McCarthy hearings. Joe McCarthy was able to get away with a lot for a long period of time, but it didn’t last forever.

Sean Illing

Something I’m kind of inching my way towards here is that we’re reached the end of what some people would call the “gatekeeping age,” and I’m not sure we really understand the implications of this.

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Before the internet, before social media, most people got their news from a handful of papers or TV networks, Walter Cronkite or whatever. These institutions function like referees. They call out the lies. They had the ability to control or manage the flow of information; in that way, impose borders on the public conversation, on the discourse.

Today, gatekeepers still matter. But there’s so much more competition for clicks and audiences. That has altered the incentive for what’s newsworthy in the first place. The consequence of that is we’re in this kind of epistemological wilderness.

Marty Baron

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Not just media outlets, but any individual can essentially become a media outlet, and many do. They spread all sorts of falsehoods and conspiracy theories. At the same time, there are individuals who have been given a greater voice who are very useful sources of quality information. Those are voices that may not have been heard in the past. There are communities that are being heard in a way that they haven’t been in the past.

Sean Illing

Do you feel like the benefits of this addition of new voices, which are obvious enough, outweigh the costs?

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Marty Baron

I’m not sure I’ve settled that in my own mind. At the end of the day, there’s nothing I can do about it. What I think is not going to change that. The question is, how do reliable sources of information persuade people that they’re presenting objective reality and facts.

Sean Illing

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Do you think we’re living in a post-truth era?

Marty Baron

I haven’t thought that much about the term. I’m not a particular fan of it because I don’t think there is such a thing as post-truth. To say we live in a post-truth world suggests that there is no such thing as truth and that everything is malleable, that it’s all just a matter of opinion, or it’s a matter of who holds power, or who has the biggest megaphone or what have you.

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Sean Illing

I think I’ve come to hate that term for different reasons. For me at least, we can’t be post-truth because we never really lived in truth in the way people suppose we did. What we had, in my opinion, was a liberal order, in which media gatekeepers like the Post dictated what passed as truth, or at least imposed limits on the number of claims to truth. That order has unraveled. Even if it still existed, we have this other, related problem, which is the collapse of public trust in elite institutions.

That collapse of faith and authority is incredibly important and not terribly understood. Truth ultimately is a function of authority. We all believe all sorts of things to be true, not because we’ve tested it in a lab or did the work, but because authorities we trust said it was true. If there are no recognized authorities, we’ve kind of lost truth.

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Marty Baron

I understand your point, but I do think there’s such a thing as truth. The media has not always been successful, but it’s been successful quite a bit. If you go back and you look at, let’s say, the coverage of the Vietnam War, ultimately the press was showing what a disaster it really was. Even though it was being denied, it turned out that was the truth.

Sean Illing

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Just to clarify, I don’t contest that there is a truth. I’m not a relativist. I would just question a lot of people’s romantic understanding of the role of truth in governing public life in the before times.

Marty Baron

Sure. There are misses in history. There are misses in our current affairs. Certainly as news organizations, we have many failings of our own and we can all point to them.

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Sean Illing

Do you think our liberal democracy can continue to function in an information climate like the one we have, which presumably is not going away anytime soon?

Marty Baron

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I think it’s going to be really difficult. It is already really difficult because in order to have democracy, I think we do have to agree on a common set of facts, basic facts. We can’t seem to do that. I mean, we can argue over the policies. We should argue. We should argue over what the problems are. We should argue over how to solve those problems. But fundamentally, we have to agree on some basic facts. We seem incapable of doing that today.

Sean Illing

I saw a Gallup poll that’s maybe a year or two old. Maybe there’s newer data, but the poll showed that less than half the country trusts what they read in the press. Why do you think people are trusting major media outlets less and less?

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Marty Baron

I don’t think the press stands alone in that regard. I think the greater threat to society is just a lack of trust in institutions. How do we get that back?

With regard to the press specifically, a lot of it has to do with the rise of the internet. People can now turn to something that reinforces their preexisting view. They live in their own echo chamber and they want that. The internet allows that. It facilitates that. It even rewards that commercially.

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Sean Illing

Do you think it’s even possible to cover bullshit without amplifying or normalizing it?

Marty Baron

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I’m not sure there’s a lot of great research on that subject, frankly, or at least I’m not familiar with it. I don’t know, are we just supposed to ignore it? Does that create its own problems? I mean, it’s really hard. I don’t know that we have good answers for how to deal with that. I don’t.

Sean Illing

What was that evaluation process like for you when you were at the Post? You have tons of really smart, talented reporters doing this work. Everyone there in the room was smart enough to understand what was happening. What was the process like, sifting through that and trying to make those decisions about what to report?

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Marty Baron

These decisions are not made by any one person. The Post does hundreds of stories every single day. At the beginning I think we paid more attention to what Trump was saying on his Twitter account than we did toward the end. But his Twitter account also was a real window into the way that the president was thinking. It’s difficult to decide which ones deserve your attention and which ones don’t, because those tweets were often a prelude to actual policies.

Sean Illing

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There is some research showing that fact-checking does tend to increase the accuracy of beliefs. But the point of zone flooding is to ensure that there is an overabundance of news so that the importance of any individual story is diminished. If you’re a bullshit artist like Trump, you don’t have to disprove anything. You just have to keep the press locked in this eternal game of whack-a-mole. Trump is gone, but it’s easy to imagine this blueprint being copied, right?

Marty Baron

Yeah. On the bigger issue you were talking about, whether the press can expose lies, let me just use one example. Take a look at the Me Too stories that were pursued by the press. In many instances, it had an impact. The whole world is not Donald Trump. The coverage of Donald Trump is not the entire coverage of the press. I look back on my own career and the work we did at the Boston Globe in exposing the coverup of sexual abuse among clergy in the Catholic Church. It continues to have an impact, and not just an impact on the church, but an impact on how many institutions are dealing with allegations of sexual abuse. I think it’s just way too easy to be too dismissive of the capacity of the press to highlight the truth.

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Sean Illing

There is a paradox here though, right? I think a lot of people assume that more information is always a good thing. It’s true, there’s a lot of bullshit percolating out there right now. But also, the access to facts has never been easier. But more information hasn’t produced a more informed citizenry. Or a more enlightened form of civic engagement. It’s led to more noise and more partisanship, and more reactionary posturing.

Marty Baron

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It is a paradox. I can’t make sense of it other than people are simply unwilling to accept facts because they don’t conform to their preexisting views. Then they are going to be upset at something that challenges their preexisting views. That’s just human nature. It’s just that the impact of that, the ramifications of that today with the internet, are far greater than they ever have been.

Sean Illing

On that front, do you think the internet has changed us, changed human nature, changed the way people think about the world and how they process the world? Or do you think it just made us more of what we always were?

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Marty Baron

I honestly don’t know. Probably a bit of both. I think the internet has revealed some aspects of us that we had not focused on or had not realized before. At the same time, it’s created patterns of behavior that were certainly facilitated and fomented patterns of behavior that wouldn’t have existed prior to the internet.

Sean Illing

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I suspect that the internet has changed the way human beings live and think and operate in the world. We’re in this new era that really doesn’t even have a name yet, but it is changing us and the world around us so quickly that none of us can really get around it.

I think the press has been in an impossible position trying to keep pace with this technological change. I really do not think anyone has an answer. The Post, the New York Times, many other places have done and continue to do remarkable work. It just feels like no matter how remarkable or important it is, 48 hours later, it’s forgotten. It’s just dead and we’re on to the next scandal, or the next thing, or the next news cycle. That feels not just disorienting, but politically cataclysmic.

Marty Baron

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I think the speed at which news needs to be delivered today, in a way, it’s too fast. I mean, people want information instantaneously, and so we provide them information instantaneously, but it’s information without context. The context is going to have to come along later if it ever comes along at all, so that’s one problem.

Sean Illing

My sense has been for a very long time that we just need a paradigm shift in how the press covers politics in a digital age. I think we need a new definition of news. Do you feel that way? Do you think we need to redefine news?

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Marty Baron

No, I actually don’t. I’m sorry.

Sean Illing

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Come on, Marty. Really?

Marty Baron

We need a paradigm shift to redefine what constitutes news? What do you mean by that exactly?

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Sean Illing

I mean a shift in what we deem worth covering and what we deem not worth covering. I mean maybe the press needs a better self-defense system against people flooding the zone with shit.

Marty Baron

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Look, we’ve learned along the way. We’ve come to realize our flaws over a period of time. Sometimes it takes too long. The journalism of today is not the journalism that existed 50 years ago. It’s very different. It has evolved. It will evolve even further. Whether we will all be in agreement whether its evolution is beneficial or not is another question. Yeah, we will shift in terms of what we believe is newsworthy. We will shift in terms of how we write about things. That has always been part of the case.

The internet has also changed things because we now have all sorts of tools at our disposal that we never had before. We’ll see changes. I don’t know if we’ll agree on whether those changes are a good thing or a bad thing. We probably won’t agree, but it’s going to change.

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‘Wait Wait’ para el 9 de octubre de 2021: Ilana Glazer juega Not My Job

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‘Wait Wait’ para el 9 de octubre de 2021: Ilana Glazer juega Not My Job


El audio estará disponible más tarde hoy.

El programa de esta semana se grabó de forma remota con el presentador Peter Sagal, el juez oficial y anotador Bill Kurtis, la invitada de Not My Job Ilana Glazer y los panelistas Helen Hong, Adam Burke y Roxanne Roberts. Haga clic en el enlace de audio de arriba para escuchar el programa completo.

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Andy Ryan / Andy Ryan / Amazonas

Ilana Glazer se arrodilla con una camisa blanca y jeans azules

Andy Ryan / Andy Ryan / Amazonas

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¿Quién es Bill esta vez?
Meltdown de las redes sociales; Un banco realmente offshore; Juego de niños para Netflix

Preguntas del panel
La empresa familiar se vuelve demasiado joven

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Fanfarronear al oyente
Nuestros panelistas cuentan tres historias sobre adultos jugando juegos de niños, de las cuales solo una es verdadera.

No es mi trabajo: cuestionamos a Ilana Glazer sobre las rosquillas
Ilana Glazer saltó a la fama como co-creadora y coprotagonista de Broad City. Ahora tiene un nuevo especial de comedia sobre la vida durante la pandemia en la ciudad de Nueva York. Como es Glazer, pensamos en preguntar sobre las cosas que se glasean: donas.

Preguntas del panel
Activando La Señal Rápida; Más pruebas que debe revisar; ¡Pantalones holgados para siempre!

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Limericks
Bill Kurtis lee tres limericks relacionados con las noticias: ¿Por qué The Californian Cross The Road? Este año no debe tener disfraz de Halloween; Un hombre va audazmente

Relámpago rellena el espacio en blanco
Todas las noticias que no caben en ningún otro lugar

Predicciones
Después del éxito de Calamares, nuestros panelistas predicen cuál será el próximo gran éxito de Netflix.

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Presentamos a las 9 integrantes finales del grupo femenino de «Girl’s Planet 999»: Kep1er

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El episodio final de Mnetprograma de supervivencia Girls Planet 999 ha terminado, lo que significa que finalmente se han decidido los ganadores. Aquí están los nueve miembros del nuevo grupo de chicas. Kep1er.

Shen Xiaoting del Grupo C (Entretenimiento de primera clase) es el noveno miembro de Kep1er con 700.663 puntos de votantes.

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Durante el transcurso del programa, Xiaoting, de 21 años, mostró sus habilidades con actuaciones de Producir 48«Rumor», «How You Like That» de BLACKPINK, «Fate» de Lee Sun Hee y la canción original «Snake» con Team Medusa. Su MBTI es ISFJ y su habilidad especial es la danza. Antes Girls Planet 999, Xiaoting también compitió en Producir Camp 2020.

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De hecho, me estaba preparando para dejar el escenario. Porque en el anuncio anterior, siempre estuve en el rango 3. Pero fue una suerte. Muchas gracias por votar, Planet Guardians. Vine aquí con esperanza y preocupación, pero recuperé mi confianza y me probé a mí mismo que no soy tan malo. Creí que podía lograr todos mis objetivos. Gracias por los maestros. Buen trabajo a todos. A todos los miembros del personal, gracias. Y a todos nuestros compañeros de equipo, quiero decirles esto. Aunque no podemos estar juntos, estés donde estés, sé feliz y lo hiciste muy bien durante estos últimos meses.

– Discurso ganador de Shen Xiaoting

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Aquí está la trayectoria de clasificación de Xiaoting desde el episodio uno hasta ahora:

Sakamoto Mashiro de J-Group (143 Entretenimiento) es el octavo miembro de Kep1er con 708.149 puntos de votantes.

Durante el transcurso del programa, Mashiro, de 21 años, mostró sus habilidades con las interpretaciones de “DUMDi DUMDi” de (G) I-DLE, “Fiesta” de IZ * ONE, “In the morning” de ITZY y la canción original “U + Yo = AMOR ”con el Equipo 7 Minutos AMOR. Su MBTI es INFP y sus habilidades especiales son bailar y cocinar.

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En primer lugar, este fue mi sueño durante tanto tiempo. Muchas gracias a Planet Guardians. Esta vez, no pensé que lo lograría. Ni siquiera preparé el discurso. Muchas gracias por ayudarme hasta aquí. Gracias por ayudarnos a crecer, maestros. Esta audición fue la última oportunidad para mí, así que fue un gran regalo para mí. Amo a toda la gente que conocí aquí. Haré todo lo posible para convertirme en un gran artista. Además, mis amigos que todavía están esperando. Todas mis unnies y hermanas menores. ¡Te quiero todo! Gracias.

– Discurso ganador de Sakamoto Mashiro

Aquí está la trayectoria de clasificación de Mashiro desde el episodio uno hasta ahora:

Ezaki Hikaru de J-Group (Academia de artistas Avex) es el séptimo miembro de Kep1er con 713,322 puntos de votantes.

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Durante el transcurso del programa, Hikaru, de 17 años, mostró sus habilidades con las presentaciones de «BOOMBAYAH» de BLACKPINK, «The Eve» de EXO, «No Excuses» de Meghan Trainor y la canción original «Snake» con Team Medusa. Su MBTI es ESFJ y su habilidad especial es rapear.

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Honestamente, nunca pensé que podría llegar al grupo de debut. El hecho de que esté aquí en la final es irreal y estoy muy feliz. Gracias por votar por mí, Planet Guardians. ¡Estoy tan feliz! ¡Gracias!

– Discurso ganador de Ezaki Hikaru

Aquí está la trayectoria de clasificación de Hikaru desde el episodio uno hasta ahora:

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El ex miembro de Busters Kang Yeseo (143 Entertainment) de K-Group es el sexto miembro de Kep1er con 770,561 puntos de los votantes.

En el transcurso del programa, Yeseo de 16 años mostró sus habilidades con las interpretaciones de “Crazy” de 4MINUTE, “Fiesta” de IZ * ONE, “Fate” de Lee Sun Hee y la canción original “Utopia” con Team UNICORN. Su MBTI es ENFJ, lo que significa que es una puta y su habilidad especial es la actuación.

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En realidad … al principio, cuando los maestros eligieron el rango, mi rango bajó y bajó de nuevo. Así que esta vez, no pensé que pudiera estar en el Top 9, y eso me hizo sufrir. Me gustaría agradecer a los Guardianes del Planeta. Además, gracias por ayudarme a estar de pie en este escenario, miembros de nuestro personal y maestros. Ni siquiera me imaginé esto. Además, unnies. Gracias por apoyarme siempre. ¡Mashiro, lo logramos juntos! Estoy tan feliz ahora. Estoy muy agradecido con mis padres, mi oppa. ¡Gracias!

– Discurso ganador de Kang Yeseo

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Aquí está la trayectoria de clasificación de Yeseo desde el episodio uno hasta ahora:

Seo Youngeun de K-Group (BIScuit Entertainment) es el quinto miembro de Kep1er con 781.657 puntos.

Durante el transcurso del programa, Youngeun de 16 años mostró sus habilidades con las presentaciones de «Kick It» de NCT 127, «How You Like That» de BLACKPINK, «My House» de 2PM y la canción original «U + Me = LOVE». con Team 7 LOVE Minutes. Su MBTI es ENTJ, y su habilidad especial es el hip-hop y el baile de grupos de chicos.

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Para mí … Siempre estuve apoyando a las chicas que llegaron al Top 9. Pero gracias a todos los Planet Guardians que me apoyaron, logré debutar. Muchas gracias a todos los Guardianes del Planeta de todo el mundo. Además, gracias por ayudarme, maestros, para poder mostrar mi mejor esfuerzo a los Guardianes del Planeta. Además, a mi familia que estará viendo esto. Te amo demasiado. Mantenerse sano. Te amo. Amo a las 99 chicas. Y a las 18 chicas finales, muchas gracias y los amo. ¡Gracias!

– Discurso ganador de Seo Youngeun

Aquí está la trayectoria de clasificación de Youngeun desde el episodio uno hasta ahora:

Kim Dayeon de K-Group (Entretenimiento de medusas) es el cuarto miembro de Kep1er con 885.286 puntos de votantes.

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Durante el transcurso del programa, Dayeon, de 18 años, mostró sus habilidades con las actuaciones de «Pop / Stars» de K / DA, «How You Like That» de BLACKPINK, «Ice Cream» de BLACKPINK y SELENA GOMEZ y la canción original «Snake». ”Con el equipo Medusa. Su MBTI es ESTP y su habilidad especial es la danza.

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Antes de que comenzara el programa, ni siquiera esperaba el debut y simplemente hice lo mejor que pude. Pero llegar al grupo de debut … es tan irreal para mí ahora. Gracias por ayudarme y practicar conmigo, todos mis amigos. Gracias y los amo a todos. ¡Muchas gracias maestros, los amo! Por último, los miembros del personal, los escritores, los productores y todo el personal, muchas gracias. Y sobre todo, mis padres. ¡Hice mi debut! ¡Te quiero! ¡Gracias!

– Discurso ganador de Kim Dayeon

Aquí está la trayectoria de clasificación de Dayeon desde el episodio uno hasta ahora:

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Choi Yujin de CLC de K-Group (Cube Entertainment) es el tercer miembro de Kep1er con 915.722 puntos de votantes.

En el transcurso del programa, Yujin de 25 años mostró sus habilidades con las presentaciones de «Bubble Pop» de HyunA, «How You Like That» de BLACKPINK, «Fate» de Lee Sun Hee y la canción original «Shoot!» con el equipo POP! CORN. Su MBTI es ENFP y su habilidad especial es hablar japonés.

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En primer lugar … durante los últimos meses, gracias por votar por mí, Planet Guardians. Cuando vine aquí por primera vez, estaba muy preocupado. Pero después de verme a mí mismo en el escenario y ser feliz, y Planet Guardians lo disfruté, pensé que era algo tan grandioso que desafié. Gracias siempre En todo momento quiero ser agradecido y humilde. ¡Gracias!

– Discurso ganador de Choi Yujin

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Aquí está la trayectoria de clasificación de Yujin desde el episodio uno hasta ahora:

Huening Bahiyyih de K-Group (Jugar M Entertainment) es el segundo miembro de Kep1er con 923.567 puntos de votantes.

Durante el transcurso del programa, Bahiyyih, de 17 años, mostró sus habilidades con las interpretaciones de “Mr. Chu ”,“ Fiesta ”de IZ * ONE, BLACKPINK y“ Ice Cream ”de Selena Gomez y la canción original“ Shoot! ” con el equipo POP! CORN. Su MBTI es ESFJ y su habilidad especial es el baile.

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De hecho, no pensé que llegaría a la etapa final. Muy agradecido con los Guardianes del Planeta de todo el mundo. Mientras hacía esto, todos mis 99 amigos que han estado conmigo y practicado conmigo, estaba realmente feliz de estar con ustedes. He crecido mucho gracias a los maestros. Además, mi familia, que siempre me ha apoyado. Planet Guardians, ¡gracias por el regalo! Como artista, intentaré crecer cada vez más.

– Discurso ganador de Huening Bahiyyih

Aquí está la trayectoria de clasificación de Bahiyyih desde el episodio uno hasta ahora:

Y Kim Chaehyun de K-Group (Entretenimiento WAKEONE) es el miembro del 1er lugar de Kep1er con 1.081.182 puntos de votantes.

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Durante el transcurso del programa, Chaehyun de 19 años mostró sus habilidades con las presentaciones de “Black Mamba” de aespa, “YES or YES” de TWICE, “My Sea” de IU y la canción original “Utopia” con Team Unicorn. Su MBTI es ESFP y sus habilidades especiales son cantar, hacer bricolaje y hablar japonés.

| Mnet

Estoy tan sorprendida que ni siquiera puedo llorar. No se que decir. En primer lugar, estoy muy agradecido con los productores, los miembros del personal y los estilistas, maquilladores. Y a mis tutores más antiguos, mi familia y mis amigos, muchas gracias. El nombre Planet Guardian se sintió incómodo al principio, pero ahora, con solo escuchar esa palabra, me anima. Mi historia en Girls Planet 999 tiene un final feliz. Gracias. Como siempre dijeron los maestros, intentaré apreciar todas las actuaciones. Gracias de nuevo.

– Discurso ganador de Kim Chaehyun

Aquí está la trayectoria de clasificación de Chaehyun desde el episodio uno hasta ahora:

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¡Y eso completa la alineación final de Kep1er! Estén atentos para más noticias sobre el nuevo grupo de chicas mientras se preparan para su debut oficial.

¿Se pregunta qué significa Kep1er? He aquí un resumen de por qué Mnet eligió este nombre para el Girls Planet 999 grupo de chicas.

Mnet anuncia el nombre del nuevo grupo de chicas de «Girls Planet 999»

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RIP Norm Macdonald

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RIP Norm Macdonald

El comediante Norm Macdonald, un icónico Sábado noche en directo miembro del elenco y comediante favorito entre los comediantes, falleció a la edad de 61 años después de una larga y privada batalla contra el cáncer. Su gerencia anunció la noticia a Deadline esta mañana.

Macdonald había estado luchando contra el cáncer durante diez años, pero mantuvo su diagnóstico en privado del público en general.

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«Estaba muy orgulloso de su comedia», dijo su socia de producción Lori Jo Hoekstra. “Él nunca quiso que el diagnóstico afectara la forma en que la audiencia o sus seres queridos lo veían. Norm era un cómico puro. Una vez escribió que ‘una broma debe tomar a alguien por sorpresa, nunca debe complacer’. Ciertamente nunca se complació. Se extrañará terriblemente a Norm «.

Macdonald tuvo un gran impacto como miembro del elenco de Sábado noche en directo, donde su Actualización de fin de semana Los segmentos eran notoriamente con púas, mordaces y muy divertidos. Continuó haciendo stand up durante años después de dejar el programa y también fue uno de los invitados más rebeldes de Conan O’Brien.

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Es difícil exagerar el impacto de Macdonald en la comedia en las décadas posteriores a ser una estrella nacional. Como comediante, Macdonald a menudo era desafiante, a veces destripando los temas de la vida real de sus chistes y otras veces dando vueltas a través de una exposición dolorosa e intencionalmente poco divertida mientras construía anticipación para el remate. Partes como su broma sobre la polilla y su broma sobre el asesino en serie acumularon millones de visitas en línea han sido objeto de análisis de YouTube que han obtenido millones de visitas.

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Macdonald’s Comedy Central roast de Bob Saget es posiblemente el segmento más memorable jamás realizado en el Comedy Central Roast serie, particularmente debido a cómo intencionalmente la «bombardeó». Mientras que otros comediantes tomaron fotos brutales de Saget, Macdonald entregó un conjunto de líneas tostadas genéricas con clasificación PG mientras la audiencia se sentaba en silencio mientras los otros comediantes aullaban de risa. Macdonald explicó más tarde que había recibido un libro de chistes «tostados» de la década de 1940 como regalo y decidió simplemente leer algunos chistes del libro en el evento.

La noticia del fallecimiento de Macdonald sorprendió a las redes sociales, y los fanáticos y colegas ofrecieron homenajes, conmoción y clips de su trabajo.

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