Connect with us

WOW

The case against the Supreme Court of the United States

Published

on

Two events occurred Monday night — one historic, the other rather insignificant — which placed an unflattering spotlight on the Supreme Court of the United States.

The historic event was that Politico published an unprecedented leak of a draft majority opinion, by Justice Samuel Alito, which would overrule Roe v. Wade and permit state lawmakers to ban abortion in its entirety in the US. Alito’s draft opinion is not the Court’s final word on this case, Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, but the leaked opinion is the latest in a long list of signs that Roe may be in its final days.

Advertisement

The other event that also occurred last night is that I sent two tweets. One praised whoever leaked Alito’s opinion for disrupting an institution that, as I have written about many times in many forums, including my first book, has historically been a malign force within the United States. And a second celebrated the leak for the distrust it might foster in such a malign institution.

The former tweet was phrased provocatively, and it attracted some attention from those on the right, including Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX). So let me clarify that I do not advocate arson as a solution to the Republican Party’s capture of the Supreme Court. I metaphorically compared the leak of Alito’s opinion to lighting the Court on fire because, as Chief Justice John Roberts noted in his statement on the leak, the Court has extraordinarily strong norms of confidentiality that it zealously protects.

Advertisement

The fact that someone inside the Court’s very small circle of trust apparently decided to leak a draft opinion is likely to be perceived by the justices, as SCOTUSBlog tweeted out Monday night, as “the gravest, most unforgivable sin.”

To this I say, “good.” If the Court does what Alito proposed in his draft opinion, and overrules Roe v. Wade, that decision will be the culmination of a decades-long effort by Republicans to capture the institution and use it, not just to undercut abortion rights but also to implement an unpopular agenda they cannot implement through the democratic process.

And the Court’s Republican majority hasn’t simply handed the Republican Party substantive policy victories. It is systematically dismantling voting rights protections that make it possible for every voter to have an equal voice, and for every political party to compete fairly for control of the United States government. Justice Alito, the author of the draft opinion overturning Roe, is also the author of two important decisions dismantling much of the Voting Rights Act.

Advertisement

This behavior, moreover, is consistent with the history of an institution that once blessed slavery and described Black people as “beings of an inferior order.” It is consistent with the Court’s history of union-busting, of supporting racial segregation, and of upholding concentration camps.

Moreover, while the present Court is unusually conservative, the judiciary as an institution has an inherent conservative bias. Courts have a great deal of power to strike down programs created by elected officials, but little ability to build such programs from the ground up. Thus, when an anti-governmental political movement controls the judiciary, it will likely be able to exploit that control to great effect. But when a more left-leaning movement controls the courts, it is likely to find judicial power to be an ineffective tool.

The Court, in other words, simply does not deserve the reverence it still enjoys in much of American society, and especially from the legal profession. For nearly all of its history, it’s been a reactionary institution, a political one that serves the interests of the already powerful at the expense of the most vulnerable. And it currently appears to be reverting to that historic mean.

Advertisement

Alito wants abortion supporters to play a rigged game

There have only been three justices in American history who were appointed by a president who lost the popular vote, and who were confirmed by a bloc of senators who represent less than half the country. All three of them sit on the Supreme Court right now, and all three were appointed by Donald Trump.

Indeed, if not for anti-democratic institutions such as the Senate and the Electoral College, it’s likely that Democrats would control a majority of the seats on the Supreme Court, and a decision overruling Roe would not be on the table.

So it is ironic — for that reason, and others — that Alito’s draft opinion overruling Roe leans heavily on appeals to democracy. Quoting from an opinion by the late Justice Antonin Scalia, Alito writes that “the permissibility of abortion, and the limitations upon it, are to be resolved like most important questions in our democracy: by citizens trying to persuade one another and then voting.”

Advertisement

If Alito truly wants to put the question of whether pregnant individuals have a right to terminate that pregnancy up to a free and fair democratic process, polling indicates that liberals could probably win that fight on a national level.

In fairness, polling on abortion often misses the nuances of public opinion. Many polls, for example, allow respondents to say that they believe that abortion should be legal “under certain circumstances” or in “most cases,” leaving anyone who reads those polls to speculate under which specific circumstances people think that abortion should be legal.

Perhaps the best evidence that proponents of legal abortion could win a fair political fight, however, is the Supreme Court’s own polling. After the Court allowed a strict anti-abortion law to take effect in Texas last fall, multiple polls found the Supreme Court’s approval rating at its lowest point ever recorded.

But public opinion may not matter much in the coming political fight over abortion, because Alito and his fellow Republican justices have spent the past decade placing a thumb on the scales of democracy — making our system even less democratic than one that already features the Electoral College and a malapportioned Senate.

Advertisement

Alito authored two opinions and joined a third that, when combined, almost completely neutralize the Voting Rights Act, the landmark legislation that took power away from Jim Crow and ensured that every American would be able to vote, regardless of their race.

Similarly, the Court’s Republican majority held in Rucho v. Common Cause (2019) that federal courts will do nothing to stop partisan gerrymandering. Alito is also one of the Court’s most outspoken proponents of the “independent state legislature doctrine,” a doctrine that, in its strongest form, would give gerrymandered Republican legislatures nearly limitless power to determine how federal elections are conducted in their state — even if those gerrymandered legislatures violate their state constitution.

One of the most troubling aspects of this Court’s jurisprudence is that it often seems to apply one set of rules to Democrats and a different, more permissive set of rules to Republicans. Last February, for example, Alito voted with four of his fellow Republicans to reinstate an Alabama congressional map that a lower court determined to be an unconstitutional racial gerrymander.

Advertisement

In blocking the lower court’s order, Alito joined an opinion arguing that the lower court’s decision was wrong because it was handed down too close to the next election.

But then, in late March, the Court enjoined Wisconsin’s state legislative maps, due to concerns that those maps may give too much political power to Black people. March is, of course, closer to the next Election Day than February. So it is difficult to square the March decision with the approach Alito endorsed in February — though it is notable that the March decision by the Supreme Court benefited the Republican Party, while the previous decision was likely to benefit Democrats.

I could list more examples of how this Court, often relying on novel legal reasoning, has advanced the Republican Party’s substantive agenda — on areas as diverse as religion, vaccination, and the right of workers to organize. But really, every issue pales in importance to the right to vote.

Advertisement

If this right is not protected, then liberals are truly defenseless — even when they enjoy overwhelming majority support.

The Court’s current behavior is consistent with its history

In Marbury v. Madison (1803), the Supreme Court held that it has the power to strike down federal laws. But the actual issue at stake in Marbury — whether a single individual named to a low-ranking federal job was entitled to that appointment — was insignificant. And, after Marbury, the Court’s power to strike down federal laws lay dormant until the 1850s.

Then came Dred Scott v. Sandford (1857), the pro-slavery decision describing Black people as “beings of an inferior order, and altogether unfit to associate with the white race either in social or political relations, and so far inferior that they had no rights which the white man was bound to respect.” Dred Scott, the Court’s very first opinion striking down a significant federal law, went after the Missouri Compromise’s provisions limiting the scope of slavery.

Advertisement

It’s not surprising that an institution made up entirely of elite lawyers, who are immune from political accountability and cannot be fired, tends to protect people who are already powerful and cast a much more skeptical eye on people who are marginalized because of their race, gender, or class. Dred Scott is widely recognized as the worst decision in the Court’s history, but it began a nearly century-long trend of Supreme Court decisions preserving white supremacy and relegating workers into destitution — a history that is glossed over in most American civics classes.

The American people ratified three constitutional amendments — the 13th, 14th, and 15th — to eradicate Dred Scott and ensure that Black Americans would enjoy, in the 14th Amendment’s words, all of the “privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States.”

But then the Court spent the next three decades largely dismantling these three amendments.

Advertisement

Just 10 years after the Civil War, the Supreme Court handed down United States v. Cruikshank (1875), a decision favoring a white supremacist mob that armed itself with guns and cannons to kill a rival Black militia defending its right to self-governance. Black people, the Court held in Cruikshank, “must look to the States” to protect civil rights such as the right to peacefully assemble — a decision that should send a chill down the spine of anyone familiar with the history of the Jim Crow South.

The culmination of this age of white supremacist jurisprudence was Plessy v. Ferguson (1896), which blessed the idea of “separate but equal.” Plessy remained good law for nearly six decades after it was decided.

After decisions like Plessy effectively dismantled the Reconstruction Amendments’ promise of racial equality, the Court spent the next 40 years transforming the 14th Amendment into a bludgeon to be used against labor. This was the age of decisions like Lochner v. New York (1905), which struck down a New York law preventing bakery owners from overworking their workers. It was also the age of decisions like Adkins v. Children’s Hospital (1923), which struck down minimum wage laws, and Adair v. United States (1908), which prohibited lawmakers from protecting the right to unionize.

Advertisement

The logic of decisions like Lochner is that the 14th Amendment’s language providing that no state may “deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law” created a “right to contract.” And that this supposed right prohibited the government from invalidating exploitative labor contracts that forced workers to labor for long hours with little pay.

As Alito notes in his draft opinion overruling Roe, the Roe opinion did rely on a similar methodology to Lochner. It found the right to an abortion to also be implicit in the 14th Amendment’s due process clause.

For what it’s worth, I actually find this portion of Alito’s opinion persuasive. I’ve argued that the Roe opinion should have been rooted in the constitutional right to gender equality — what the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg once described as the “opportunity women will have to participate as men’s full partners in the nation’s social, political, and economic life” — and not the extraordinarily vague and easily manipulated language of the due process clause.

Advertisement

Indeed, one of the most striking things about the Court’s Lochner-era jurisprudence is how willing the justices were to manipulate legal doctrines — applying one doctrine in one case, then ignoring it when it was likely to benefit a party that they did not want to prevail.

In Hammer v. Dagenhart (1918), for example, the Supreme Court struck down a federal law that prohibited goods produced by child labor from traveling across state lines. The reason Congress structured this ban on child labor in such an unusual way is because the Supreme Court had repeatedly held prior to Dagenhart that Congress could ban products from traveling in interstate commerce — among other things, the Court upheld a law prohibiting lottery tickets from traveling across state lines in Champion v. Ames (1903).

But the rule announced in Champion and similar cases was brushed aside once Congress decided to use its lawful authority to protect workers.

Advertisement

The Court also did not exactly cover itself in glory after President Franklin Roosevelt filled it with New Dealers who rejected decisions like Lochner and Hammer. One of the most significant Supreme Court decisions of the Roosevelt era, for example, was Korematsu v. United States (1944), the decision holding that Japanese Americans could be forced into concentration camps during World War II, for the sin of having the wrong ancestors.

The point is that decisions like Alito’s draft Dobbs opinion, which would commandeer the bodies of millions of Americans — or decisions dismantling the Voting Rights Act — are entirely consistent with the Court’s history as defender of traditional hierarchies. Alito is not an outlier in the Court’s history. He is quite representative of the justices who came before him.

The judiciary is structurally biased in favor of conservatives

In offering this critique of the Supreme Court, I will acknowledge that the Court’s history has not been an unbroken string of reactionary decisions dashing the hopes of liberalism. The Court’s marriage equality decision in Obergefell v. Hodges (2015), for example, was a real victory for liberals — although, as several commentators have noted, there is language in Alito’s draft Dobbs opinion suggesting that, if Roe falls, LGBTQ+ rights could be next.

Advertisement

But the Court’s ability to spearhead progressive change that does not, like marriage equality, enjoy broad popular support is quite limited. The seminal work warning of the heavy constraints on the Court’s ability to effect such change is Gerald Rosenberg’s The Hollow Hope, which argues that “courts lack the tools to readily develop appropriate policies and implement decisions ordering significant social reform,” at least when those reforms aren’t also supported by elected officials.

This constraint on the judiciary’s ability to effect progressive change was most apparent in the aftermath of perhaps the Court’s most celebrated decision: Brown v. Board of Education (1954).

Brown triggered “massive resistance” from white supremacists, especially in the Deep South. As Harvard legal historian Michael Klarman has documented, five years after Brown, only 40 of North Carolina’s 300,000 Black students attended an integrated school. Six years after Brown, only 42 of Nashville’s 12,000 Black students were integrated. A decade after Brown, only 1 in 85 African American students in the South attended an integrated school.

Advertisement

The courts simply lacked the institutional capacity to implement a school desegregation decision that Southern states were determined to resist. Among other things, when a school district refused to integrate, the only way to obtain a court order mandating desegregation was for a Black family to file a lawsuit against it. But terrorist groups like the Ku Klux Klan used the very real threat of violence to ensure few lawsuits were filed.

No one dared to file such a lawsuit seeking to integrate a Mississippi grade school, for example, until 1963.

Indeed, much of the South did not really begin to integrate until Congress passed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which allowed the Justice Department to sue segregated schools, and which allowed federal officials to withhold funding from schools that refused to integrate. Within two years after this act became law, the number of Southern Black students attending integrated schools increased fivefold. By 1973, 90 percent of these students were desegregated.

Advertisement

Rosenberg’s most depressing conclusion is that, while liberal judges are severely constrained in their ability to effect progressive change, reactionary judges have tremendous ability to hold back such change. “Studies of the role of the courts in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries,” Rosenberg writes, “ show that courts can effectively block significant social reform.”

And, while such reactionary decisions may eventually fall if there is a sustained political effort to overrule them, this process can take a very long time. Dagenhart was decided in 1918. The Court did not overrule it, and thus permit Congress to ban child labor, until 1941.

There are several structural reasons courts are a stronger ally for conservative movements than they are for progressive ones. For starters, in most constitutional cases courts only have the power to strike down a law — that is, to destroy an edifice that the legislature has built. The Supreme Court could repeal Obamacare, but it couldn’t have created the Affordable Care Act’s complex array of government-run marketplaces, subsidies, and mandates.

Advertisement

Litigation, in other words, is a far more potent tool in the hands of an anti-governmental movement than it is in the hands of one seeking to build a more robust regulatory and welfare state. It’s hard to cure poverty when your only tool is a bomb.

So, to summarize my argument, the judiciary, for reasons laid out by Rosenberg and others, structurally favors conservatives. People who want to dismantle government programs can accomplish far more, when they control the courts, than people who want to build up those programs. And, as the Court’s history shows, when conservatives do control the Court, they use their power to devastating effect.

This alone is a reason for liberals, small-d democrats, large-D Democrats, and marginalized groups more broadly, to take a more critical eye to the courts. And the judiciary’s structural conservatism is augmented by the fact that, in the United States, institutions like the Electoral College and Senate malapportionment give Republicans a huge leg up in the battle for control of the judiciary.

Advertisement

Of course I do not believe that we should literally light the Supreme Court of the United States on fire, but I do believe that diminished public trust in the Court is a good thing. This institution has not served the American people well, and it’s time to start treating it that way.

Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Comentanos

WOW

Los miembros del jurado en el juicio de Depp-Heard escuchan los argumentos finales y comienzan las deliberaciones

Published

on

Los miembros del jurado en el juicio de Depp-Heard escuchan los argumentos finales y comienzan las deliberaciones

Esta combinación de dos fotos separadas muestra a los actores Johnny Depp, a la izquierda, y Amber Heard en la sala del tribunal para los argumentos finales en el Tribunal de Circuito del Condado de Fairfax en Fairfax, Virginia, el viernes.

Advertisement

Steve Helber/AP


ocultar título

Advertisement

alternar título

Steve Helber/AP

Esta combinación de dos fotos separadas muestra a los actores Johnny Depp, a la izquierda, y Amber Heard en la sala del tribunal para los argumentos finales en el Tribunal de Circuito del Condado de Fairfax en Fairfax, Virginia, el viernes.

Advertisement

Steve Helber/AP

Después de un juicio de seis semanas en el que Johnny Depp y Amber Heard se pelearon por los desagradables detalles de su breve matrimonio, ambas partes le dijeron al jurado exactamente lo mismo el viernes: quieren recuperar sus vidas.

Escuchó que «arruinó su vida al decirle falsamente al mundo que ella era una sobreviviente de abuso doméstico a manos del Sr. Depp», dijo la abogada de Depp, Camille Vásquez, al jurado en los argumentos finales en su juicio por difamación contra su ex esposa.

Advertisement

Mientras tanto, los abogados de Heard dijeron que Depp arruinó la vida de Heard al lanzar una campaña difamatoria en su contra cuando se divorció de él y lo acusó públicamente de agresión en 2016.

«En el mundo del Sr. Depp, no dejas al Sr. Depp», dijo el abogado de Heard, J. Benjamin Rottenborn. «Si lo haces, comenzará una campaña de humillación global contra ti».

Depp espera que el juicio ayude a restaurar su reputación, aunque se ha convertido en un espectáculo de un matrimonio vicioso, con cámaras de transmisión en la sala del tribunal que capturan cada giro a una audiencia cada vez más absorta mientras los fanáticos intervienen en las redes sociales y hacen fila durante la noche para el codiciado asientos de la sala de audiencias.

Advertisement

«Este caso para el señor Depp nunca ha sido por dinero», dijo el abogado de Depp, Benjamin Chew. «Se trata de la reputación del señor Depp y de liberarlo de la prisión en la que ha vivido durante los últimos seis años».

Depp está demandando a Heard por $ 50 millones en el Tribunal de Circuito del Condado de Fairfax de Virginia por un artículo de opinión de 2018 que escribió en The Washington Post describiéndose a sí misma como «una figura pública que representa el abuso doméstico». Sus abogados dicen que fue difamado por el artículo a pesar de que nunca mencionó su nombre.

Heard presentó una contrademanda de 100 millones de dólares contra la ex estrella de «Piratas del Caribe» después de que su abogado calificó sus acusaciones como un engaño. Aunque la contrademanda recibió menos atención en el juicio, la abogada de Heard, Elaine Bredehoft, dijo que proporciona una vía para que el jurado compense a Heard por el abuso que Depp le infligió incluso después de que se separaron al orquestar una campaña de difamación.

Advertisement

«Les pedimos que finalmente responsabilicen a este hombre», le dijo al jurado. «Él nunca ha aceptado la responsabilidad de nada en su vida».

El jurado civil de siete personas comenzó sus deliberaciones a las 3 pm del viernes y terminó el día unas dos horas después. Se reanudarán el martes.

Depp dice que nunca golpeó a Heard y que ella inventó las acusaciones de abuso. Ha dicho que él fue atacado físicamente por Heard varias veces.

Advertisement

“Hay un abusador en esta sala del tribunal, pero no es el señor Depp”, dijo Vásquez.

Durante el juicio, Heard testificó sobre más de una docena de episodios de agresión física y sexual que dijo que Depp le infligió.

Vásquez, en su cierre, señaló que Heard tuvo que revisar su testimonio sobre la primera vez que dijo que la golpearon. Heard dijo que Depp la golpeó después de que ella se riera inadvertidamente de uno de sus tatuajes. Heard inicialmente dijo que sucedió en 2013, después de un año de cuento de hadas de cortejo y romance, pero luego se corrigió para decir que sucedió en 2012, muy temprano en su relación.

Advertisement

«Ahora, en esta sala del tribunal, de repente ha borrado todo un año de magia», dijo Vásquez.

Los miembros del jurado han visto varias fotos de Heard con marcas y moretones en la cara, pero algunas fotos muestran solo un enrojecimiento leve y otras muestran moretones más severos.

Vásquez acusó a Heard de manipular las fotos y dijo que la evidencia de que Heard ha embellecido algunas de sus heridas es prueba de que todas sus afirmaciones de abuso son infundadas.

Advertisement

«O te lo crees todo o no lo crees», dijo. «O es víctima de un abuso feo y horrible, o es una mujer que está dispuesta a decir absolutamente cualquier cosa».

En el cierre de Heard, Rottenborn dijo que el quisquilloso sobre la evidencia de abuso de Heard ignora el hecho de que hay evidencia abrumadora a su favor y envía un mensaje peligroso a las víctimas de violencia doméstica.

«Si no tomaste fotos, no sucedió», dijo Rottenborn. «Si tomaste fotos, son falsas. Si no le dijiste a tus amigos, están mintiendo. Si les dijiste a tus amigos, son parte del engaño».

Advertisement

Y rechazó la sugerencia de Vásquez de que si el jurado cree que Heard podría estar embelleciendo un solo acto de abuso, tienen que ignorar todo lo que ella dice. Dijo que el reclamo por difamación de Depp debe fallar si Heard sufrió incluso un solo incidente de abuso.

«Están tratando de engañarte para que pienses que Amber tiene que ser perfecta para ganar», dijo Rottenborn.

Cuando el jurado delibere, tendrá que centrarse no solo en si hubo abuso, sino también en si el artículo de opinión de Heard puede considerarse legalmente difamatorio. El artículo en sí se centra principalmente en cuestiones de política de violencia doméstica, pero el abogado de Depp señala dos pasajes del artículo, así como un titular en línea que dicen que difamaba a Depp.

Advertisement

En el primer pasaje, Heard escribe que «hace dos años, me convertí en una figura pública que representaba el abuso doméstico y sentí toda la fuerza de la ira de nuestra cultura». Los abogados de Depp lo llaman una referencia clara a Depp, dado que Heard acusó públicamente a Depp de violencia doméstica en 2016, dos años antes de que ella escribiera el artículo.

En un segundo pasaje, afirma: «Tuve la rara ventaja de ver, en tiempo real, cómo las instituciones protegen a los hombres acusados ​​de abuso».

El titular en línea dice «Amber Heard: hablé en contra de la violencia sexual y enfrenté la ira de nuestra cultura».

Advertisement

«Ella no mencionó su nombre. No tenía que hacerlo», dijo Chew. «Todos sabían exactamente de quién y de qué estaba hablando la Sra. Heard».

Los abogados de Heard dijeron que Heard no puede ser responsable por el titular porque ella no lo escribió, y que los dos pasajes del artículo no tratan sobre las acusaciones de abuso en sí, sino sobre cómo cambió la vida de Heard después de que las hizo.

Rottenborn le dijo a los miembros del jurado que incluso si tienden a creer la afirmación de Depp de que nunca abusó de Heard, todavía no puede ganar su caso porque Heard tiene el derecho de la Primera Enmienda de intervenir en asuntos de debate público.

Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading

WOW

“Algunas imágenes”: 50 fotos confusas y divertidas sin contexto, compartidas en esta página de Facebook

Published

on

“Algunas imágenes”: 50 fotos confusas y divertidas sin contexto, compartidas en esta página de Facebook

Ya sea que estemos hablando de imágenes que solo se vuelven más raras cuanto más las miramos o fotos que simplemente no tienen ningún sentido, las personas parecen obsesionadas con descifrar las perplejidades con las que se topan en línea. Después de todo, el hecho de que Internet sea un lugar extraño no es nada nuevo. A veces, incluso parece un pozo sin fondo de cosas aleatorias y extrañas que nos dejan rascándonos la cabeza por la confusión. ¡Pero al menos nos hace pegar los ojos a las pantallas!

Advertisement

Permítanos presentarle la página de Facebook ‘Algunas imágenes’. Con más de 236 000 seguidores, publica algunas de las imágenes más ridículas y maravillosamente caóticas que desesperadamente Ruego por más contexto. Sin subtítulos de ningún tipo, dejan la puerta abierta para que las personas construyan sus propias interpretaciones y se rían genuinamente en el camino.

Así que siéntate y abróchate el cinturón de seguridad porque vamos a dar un paseo en una salvaje montaña rusa hacia lo profundo de la tierra de las tonterías. nosotros en panda aburrido han reunido algunas de las mejores publicaciones de la página y las han envuelto en una compilación desconcertante a continuación. ¡Continúe desplazándose, vote a favor de sus favoritos y asegúrese de compartir su desconcierto con nosotros en los comentarios!

Más información: Facebook

Advertisement

#1

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#2

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

Advertisement

#3

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

Durante mucho tiempo hemos escuchado que cuando se trata de compartir imágenes en línea, las personas optan por una estética brillante y escenarios cuidadosamente organizados para mostrar el lado bueno de la vida. Pero en realidad, Internet es un lugar hilarantemente extraño. La página de Facebook ‘Algunas imágenes’ está aquí para reventar su burbuja y mostrar algunas de las fotos más fuera de contexto que hacen que el mundo en línea parezca un gran caos. ¿Un campo de fútbol inclinado? Controlar. ¿Una roca que se asemeja a un controlador de Xbox? Sí. ¿Una escalera mecánica que resulta ser solo un tramo normal de escaleras? Lo adivinaste. Tiene mucho contenido para hacer que la gente esté al menos un poco confundida y muy entretenida.

El creador de esta página se ha propuesto la misión de recopilar las imágenes más ridículas de personas y animales flotando y, por lo que parece, lo están haciendo bien. Estas fotos son la trampa de atención perfecta porque una vez que tus ojos se posan en ellas, es difícil apartar la mirada.

Advertisement

#4

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#5

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#6

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

Advertisement

A medida que se desplaza por esta lista, notará cuán vívidamente ilustra el lado extraño de la humanidad y cuán abiertas a la interpretación son estas fotos. Las cosas que son difíciles de categorizar pueden sacarnos de nuestro juego, haciendo que nos concentremos en resolver estos acertijos desconcertantes. Después de todo, muchos de nosotros sentimos el deseo de comprender lo que está justo frente a nosotros, y si no podemos identificar lo que estamos viendo, comenzamos a sentirnos incómodos y confundidos.

Según el científico psicológico Jason M. Lodge y el profesor de educación superior Gregor Kennedy, generalmente se experimenta confusión cuando nos topamos con nueva información. Especialmente cuando este nuevo conocimiento es complejo, contrario a la intuición o diferente a todo lo que hemos encontrado antes. Si bien es difícil argumentar que sentirse perplejo es al menos un poco molesto, puede ser útil (¡y a veces incluso necesario!) cuando queremos aprender algo nuevo. Verás, la confusión está incluida en las emociones epistémicas. En otras palabras, es una emoción que está específicamente asociada con el desarrollo de nuestro conocimiento y comprensión.

#7

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

Advertisement

#8

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#9

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

Los autores afirmaron que hay dos tipos de confusión: productiva e improductiva. «Cuando las personas están tratando de aprender algo nuevo, la confusión a menudo se ve como algo negativo, algo que debe evitarse», escribieron. «Pocos de nosotros pensaríamos fácilmente que una experiencia de aprendizaje positiva se asoció con el estado de confusión. La razón más obvia de esto es que la confusión, cuando persiste, puede convertirse muy fácilmente en frustración o aburrimiento». Las personas deben tratar de evitar meterse en estas situaciones, ya que están a un paso de desvincularse y abandonar el tema.

Advertisement

#10

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#11

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#12

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

Advertisement

La clave para hacer que nuestro desconcierto nos sea útil es reconocerlo y asegurarnos de que no persista por mucho tiempo. En primer lugar, tenemos que reconocer que nos sentimos confundidos. «La mayoría de los participantes en nuestros estudios se han mostrado reacios a admitir que experimentan confusión. Solo se revela más tarde a través de entrevistas en profundidad», anotaron los investigadores. «Esto no es sorprendente, ya que existe un estigma negativo asociado a la confusión. A menudo se piensa injustamente como un signo de estupidez o falta de inteligencia». Si desea aprovechar esta emoción cuando enfrenta desafíos con nuevos conceptos e ideas, reconozca que existe. «Siéntete cómodo con esto, pero busca resolverlo».

#13

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#14

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

Advertisement

#15

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

En estos días, sin embargo, las teorías complejas a menudo se presentan de una manera fácil, atractiva y entretenida para atraer a las masas. Los videos en los medios y en línea pueden explicar rápidamente ideas difíciles con narraciones fáciles de entender y animaciones fluidas. «Puede ser fácil encontrar información sobre fenómenos muy complejos, como el cambio climático o la vacunación, que parece fácil de entender y se alinea bien con nuestras concepciones intuitivas (¡o conceptos erróneos!)», afirmaron los autores. «Internet ha facilitado la búsqueda de explicaciones muy interesantes y atractivas de fenómenos que son muy buenos para reducir la complejidad y hacer que estos conceptos sean comprensibles».

#dieciséis

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

Advertisement

#17

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#18

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

Pero si queremos comprender completamente los beneficios de la confusión, debemos comprender dos lecciones, argumentaron. «Primero, estar confundido acerca de conceptos y fenómenos complejos puede significar que estamos invirtiendo suficiente esfuerzo mental para tratar de comprender. No encontrar ideas nuevas y complejas confusas al principio puede ser un signo de exceso de confianza que se ha demostrado de manera confiable que es perjudicial para el aprendizaje».

Advertisement

En segundo lugar, la gente debería aceptar que la lucha y el desconcierto son partes importantes del proceso de aprendizaje. «Al encontrar ideas nuevas y complejas, es útil encontrarlas desafiantes y confusas, siempre que la confusión no persista por mucho tiempo», escribieron Lodge y Kennedy. «La lucha asociada con la superación de la confusión nos ayuda a encontrar mejores estrategias para comprender el mundo».

#19

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#20

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

Advertisement

#21

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#22

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#23

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

Advertisement

#24

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#25

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#26

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

Advertisement

#27

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#28

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#29

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

Advertisement

#30

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#31

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#32

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

Advertisement

#33

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#34

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#35

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

Advertisement

#36

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#37

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#38

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

Advertisement

#39

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#40

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#41

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

Advertisement

#42

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#43

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#44

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

Advertisement

#45

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#46

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#47

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

Advertisement

#48

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#49

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

#50

Créditos de imagen: SomeImages1

Advertisement

Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading

WOW

Colombia va a elecciones el domingo con una izquierda que busca hacer historia

Published

on

Colombia va a elecciones el domingo con una izquierda que busca hacer historia

Asistentes durante un mitin de cierre de campaña del candidato presidencial Gustavo Petro en Bogotá, Colombia. Petro va adelante en las encuestas para las elecciones de este domingo, pero se espera que pase a una segunda vuelta en junio.

Advertisement

Andrés Cardona/Bloomberg/Getty Images


ocultar título

Advertisement

alternar título

Andrés Cardona/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Asistentes durante un mitin de cierre de campaña del candidato presidencial Gustavo Petro en Bogotá, Colombia. Petro va adelante en las encuestas para las elecciones de este domingo, pero se espera que pase a una segunda vuelta en junio.

Advertisement

Andrés Cardona/Bloomberg/Getty Images

BOGOTÁ, Colombia — En su mitin final de campaña antes de la primera vuelta de las elecciones presidenciales de Colombia el domingo, Gustavo Petro señaló alegremente que los poderes fácticos se encogen ante la idea de que él pueda ganar.

«Por supuesto que tienen miedo», dijo Petro, un ex guerrillero de izquierda convertido en político, a miles de simpatizantes en Bogotá, la capital. “Tienen miedo porque los vamos a sacar del poder”.

Advertisement

Las encuestas colocan a Petro como el claro favorito y, de ser elegido, se comprometió a traer cambios importantes a Colombia que han molestado a la clase empresarial. Pero si ninguno de los candidatos obtiene más de la mitad de los votos el domingo, como también predicen las encuestas, los dos principales candidatos se enfrentarán en una segunda vuelta el 19 de junio.

El candidato presidencial Gustavo Petro habla durante un debate presidencial en el el tiempo periódico en Bogotá el lunes, antes de las elecciones de primera vuelta del 29 de mayo.

Fernando Vergara/AP

Advertisement


ocultar título

alternar título

Advertisement

Fernando Vergara/AP

El candidato presidencial Gustavo Petro habla durante un debate presidencial en el el tiempo periódico en Bogotá el lunes, antes de las elecciones de primera vuelta del 29 de mayo.

Fernando Vergara/AP

Advertisement

La competencia está subiendo hacia una segunda ronda

Los otros principales candidatos son Federico Gutiérrez, exalcalde conservador de Medellín, Rodolfo Hernández, empresario populista y exalcalde de la ciudad de Bucaramanga, y Sergio Fajardo, exalcalde de Medellín centrista y exgobernador del departamento de Antioquia.

Las encuestas auguran que en una segunda vuelta, Petro ganaría a Gutiérrez o Fajardo. Pero algunas encuestas colocan a Petro en un empate estadístico con Hernández, quien ha evitado debates y eventos de campaña en persona a favor de los videos en las redes sociales. Aún así, ha ascendido en las encuestas recientes y ha conectado a muchos colombianos con sus promesas de eliminar la corrupción.

Los candidatos presidenciales colombianos Federico Gutiérrez (izquierda) y Rodolfo Hernández sostienen carteles durante un debate en Bogotá el 20 de abril.

Advertisement

Juan Barreto/AFP vía Getty Images


ocultar título

Advertisement

alternar título

Juan Barreto/AFP vía Getty Images

Los candidatos presidenciales colombianos Federico Gutiérrez (izquierda) y Rodolfo Hernández sostienen carteles durante un debate en Bogotá el 20 de abril.

Advertisement

Juan Barreto/AFP vía Getty Images

“Voy a ir tras todos los políticos que son ladrones”, dijo el miércoles Hernández, de 77 años, en una entrevista en la televisión colombiana. No todos son ladrones, pero casi todos lo son.

Sin embargo, en el período previo a las elecciones, es Petro quien ha ocupado la mayoría de los titulares y ha causado la mayor consternación entre los líderes empresariales, los militares y los votantes conservadores en una nación que nunca antes había elegido a un presidente de izquierda.

Advertisement

Pasó de luchador rebelde a candidato presidencial

Petro una vez trató de luchar para llegar al poder como miembro del grupo guerrillero M-19. Los rebeldes firmaron un tratado de paz en 1990 y desde entonces, Petro se ha desempeñado en el Congreso y como alcalde de Bogotá.

Ahora en su tercera carrera por la presidencia, Petro, de 62 años, espera unirse un número creciente de izquierdistas ahora gobierna gran parte de América Latina, incluidos México, Nicaragua, Venezuela, Perú, Chile y Argentina.

Petro promete aumentar los impuestos a los ricos para pagar los programas contra la pobreza. Quiere renegociar acuerdos comerciales, incluso con Estados Unidos, dice, para proteger mejor las industrias y la agricultura de Colombia. Para forjar una economía más verde, quiere eliminar gradualmente la producción de petróleo, la mayor exportación del país, y reemplazar esos ingresos con el turismo.

Advertisement

Dueño de negocio amenazó a empleados que votan por Petro

Pero todo esto podría provocar fuga de capitales, cierre de empresas y desempleo masivo, según muchos líderes empresariales, que instan a los colombianos a rechazar a Petro en las urnas el domingo.

«Sin duda Colombia tiene problemas. Pero eso no es razón para saltar al vacío o arriesgarse a un cambio radical», dijo Miguel Cortés, uno de los empresarios más influyentes de Colombia, en un mensaje de video a los votantes.

Otro empresario, Sergio Araujo, recientemente tuiteó que despediría a cualquiera de sus empleados que votara por Petro. En una entrevista con la revista colombiana semanaAraujo llamó a Petro un «destructor de empresas que lleva cinco décadas luchando contra la libre empresa en Colombia».

Advertisement

Algunos colombianos de clase media también están preocupados.

Roxanne Restrepo, que trabaja en banca y finanzas en Bogotá, está nerviosa por el plan de Petro de pedir prestado a fondos de pensiones privados para ampliar los beneficios de jubilación de los colombianos pobres. Y no está esperando a que las elecciones tomen medidas.

«He estado enviando algunos de mis ahorros al extranjero y hemos estado buscando para ver si podemos obtener la ciudadanía portuguesa para ver si necesitamos salir del país», dice Restrepo.

Advertisement

Petro también se ha peleado con el ejército colombiano, sugiriendo el mes pasado que algunos de sus altos oficiales están trabajando en connivencia con los narcotraficantes. Eso provocó una furiosa diatriba anti-Petro en Twitter del comandante del ejército. Gral. Eduardo Zapateiroa pesar de que, según la constitución de Colombia, se supone que los militares deben mantenerse al margen de la política.

El excoronel del ejército John Marulanda, que luchó contra Petro durante la guerra de guerrillas y ahora dirige una asociación nacional de oficiales militares retirados, lo expresó sin rodeos en una entrevista con NPR: «No queremos un exguerrillero, un guerrillero retirado el presidente de Colombia. Y si sucede, nos declaramos en la oposición”.

Podría realinear el país lejos de los EE. UU.

Marulanda y otros también cuestionan el compromiso de Petro con la democracia.

Advertisement

Por un lado, Petro tiene la intención de forjar lazos más estrechos con el régimen autoritario de la vecina Venezuela. Eso plantea un cambio significativo para Colombia, estrechamente alineada durante mucho tiempo con EE. UU. y un crítico acérrimo del gobierno de Caracas. Debido a que su coalición política Pacto Histórico carecería de mayoría en el Congreso, Petro ha hablado de aprobar leyes económicas por decreto.

No solo «ahora está proponiendo un cambio radical en la economía, sino que en realidad está presionando el botón nuclear sobre lo que potencialmente podría hacerle a la democracia», dice Sergio Guzmán, director de la consultora Colombia Risk Analysis.

Petro y sus muchos seguidores quieren un cambio

Partidarios del candidato presidencial Gustavo Petro asisten a un mitin de cierre de campaña en Zipaquirá, Colombia, el 22 de mayo, una semana antes de las elecciones.

Advertisement

Fernando Vergara/AP


ocultar título

Advertisement

alternar título

Fernando Vergara/AP

Partidarios del candidato presidencial Gustavo Petro asisten a un mitin de cierre de campaña en Zipaquirá, Colombia, el 22 de mayo, una semana antes de las elecciones.

Advertisement

Fernando Vergara/AP

Petro afirma que tales críticas son injustas y ha señalado que el presidente Iván Duque, a quien no se le permite postularse por segundo mandato consecutivo, también aprobó leyes económicas por decreto durante la pandemia.

Frustrado por las acusaciones de los candidatos de la oposición de que planea expropiar propiedades privadas si gana la presidencia, Petro realizó una conferencia de prensa ante un notario público donde firmó un documento comprometiéndose a no expropiar fincas y negocios.

Advertisement

Y en una entrevista con NPR el mes pasado, Petro negó que tuviera una agenda radical. Señaló que el Las Naciones Unidas están instando a los países a que se alejen de los hidrocarburos y que aumentar los impuestos a los ricos para ayudar a los pobres es de sentido común a raíz de una pandemia que elevó la tasa de pobreza de Colombia del 35,7 % al 42,5 % en 2020.

“Estas son cosas normales”, dijo Petro, hablando en Zoom. Pero en Colombia «son vistos como de izquierda y revolucionarios».

Muchos colombianos frustrados están de acuerdo con Petro.

Advertisement

Incluyen a Sara Gallego, de 34 años, una entrenadora de atletismo que asistió al mitin de cierre de campaña de Petro. Marcó una larga lista de los problemas del país, desde el desempleo hasta la desnutrición, que dice que han sido ignorados por el presidente Duque y los gobiernos anteriores.

Por eso, dice, la élite gobernante tradicional solo tiene la culpa de la popularidad de Petro.

Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading

Facebook

¿Búscas empleo?

Videos

Lo más visto

A %d blogueros les gusta esto: