Connect with us

WOW

The intertwined legacies of Jonathan Larson and Lin-Manuel Miranda

Published

on

Before press screenings of Tick, Tick … Boom!, the new movie based on an autobiographical musical by Rent composer Jonathan Larson, a message played. It was from Lin-Manuel Miranda, the film’s director as well as the creator and star of Hamilton.

“When I was making this film,” Miranda said, “I just kept thinking, ‘What would Jonathan Larson want?’ That was my first goal.”

Advertisement

Miranda’s desire to stay true to Larson’s vision breathes through Tick, Tick … Boom! The film, which stars Andrew Garfield as Larson, is suffused with an affectionate protectiveness: protectiveness toward Larson, who died at age 35 in 1996, and toward Larson’s musical legacy.

Tick, Tick … Boom!, out on Netflix this Friday, tells the story of a musical theater composer named Jonathan Larson as he approaches his 30th birthday. He’s landed a workshop for the big ambitious musical he’s working on, and he’s pinned all his hopes for the future on it: After the workshop, he won’t have to work as a waiter anymore; after the workshop, he’ll be a success. Larson wrote Tick, Tick … Boom! before he actually did become a success, so he doesn’t know, as we do, that neither this show nor the show within the show will make his legacy. Rent, which won him a posthumous Pulitzer and reshaped Broadway forever, will.

This movie is not a hagiography, and it stops short of treating Larson like a genius. Miranda keeps a sort of tender distance away from Larson’s perspective, so that we have room to critique both his egotism and his music, which is juvenile, frequently mediocre, and only occasionally brilliant. What’s most compelling is not the actual music Larson is writing in this movie so much as it is his terrible, endearing commitment to his music above everything else in his life. He wants to be great, and he’s committed to putting in the work to become great, but he’s not there yet.

Advertisement

But Tick, Tick … Boom! does operate with the understanding that Larson was a shockingly talented young composer, and that he was maybe on the verge of becoming great just before he died. Watching it, you can’t help but mourn the loss of Jonathan Larson all over again — and think that at least he’s got an apt guardian in Lin-Manuel Miranda.

Miranda’s career has paralleled Larson’s for a long time now. Both wrote generation-defining, Pulitzer-prize winning musicals; both pushed Broadway’s musical vocabulary forward toward the present. And both wrote musicals that are obsessed with the problem of mortality and ambition, and how to accomplish great works in a life cut short.

With Miranda’s Tick, Tick … Boom!, the story of these two composers is coming full circle.

Advertisement

“I’m going to bring rock ‘n’ roll back to Broadway”

Jonathan Larson started writing Tick, Tick … Boom! in 1989. He was about to turn 30, and he had just failed to land any producers for his ambitious space-age musical Superbia, which meant he was stuck at his weekend job as a waiter. Meanwhile, his close friend Matt O’Grady had just tested positive for HIV.

Larson had already lost several friends to the AIDS epidemic. He was feeling very aware of his mortality. He was also feeling bitter that every producer who came to his Superbia workshop had told him that it was both too expensive to mount off-Broadway and too weird to mount on Broadway. So he channeled his frustrations and his grief into a musical he could put on just by himself with a small band. It would be a rock monologue about the twin ticking clocks of his potential and his friend’s life, both of which he feared might be about to run out.

The show made the rounds at various small off-Broadway theaters, going through a few different titles — 30/90, Boho Days — before settling on Tick, Tick … Boom! It was a modest success, and it won Larson the attention of theater producer Jeffrey Seller. “Here was a man telling his life story that I felt was my life story, and telling it in a musical vernacular that was giving me goosebumps,” Seller recalled in Michael Riedel’s 2020 book Singular Sensation: The Triumph of Broadway.

Advertisement

Broadway’s musical vernacular at the time was the sound of Cats, Les Miserables, and Phantom of the Opera: big, bombastic pop musicals that didn’t sound like anything on the radio. The literati of New York’s theater scene were forever griping over how far away American musical theater had gotten from any sort of sound that felt fresh and modern and rooted in the music that the rest of the country was listening to. But no one seemed to have a clear idea of how to bring Broadway’s sound into the present. Seller had a hunch that Larson would be the guy to pull it off. Larson agreed. “I’m going to bring rock ‘n’ roll back to Broadway,” he used to tell people.

For that reason, Seller would become an early supporter of Larson’s next project: a reimagining of Puccini’s La Boheme as a rock opera set in New York’s gritty Alphabet City, about impoverished artists like Larson and his friends. It was called Rent, and when it premiered on Broadway in 1996, it was an instant smash hit, earning Larson three posthumous Tonys and a posthumous Pulitzer. And it did indeed change the sound of Broadway permanently. It took until the 1990s, decades after the birth of rock, but Rent made American musical theater finally and at last embrace the rock musical with open arms.

Larson didn’t live to see it. He died in his apartment of an aortic aneurysm the night before Rent’s off-Broadway premiere. He was just weeks shy of his 36th birthday.

Advertisement

After Larson’s death, producers returned to Tick, Tick … Boom! to see if they could find a way to restage it without him. Playwright David Auburn came on board to reshape Larson’s existing material, turning it from a monologue into a three-person chamber musical. After Auburn’s revisions, the new show was no longer a one-man experience. Instead, it featured characters based on Matt O’Grady and on the dancer Larson was dating while he tried to stage Superbia alongside Jonathan as our central character.

The three-person Tick, Tick … Boom! never became the smash Rent did, but it did develop a cult following. It premiered off-Broadway in 2001, and various revivals of the project toured frequently over the next decade.

And in 2014, New York City Center’s Encores! Off-Center series produced a revival of Tick, Tick … Boom! In the role of Jonathan Larson, it starred the hot young composer/actor Lin-Manuel Miranda.

Advertisement

“I want to change the landscape of American musical theatre”

Miranda first saw Rent when he was either 16 or 17 years old (he tells this story a lot, but his accounts vary). “It was the first truly contemporary musical I had ever seen,” he told the New Yorker in November. “I remember thinking, This takes place now? In New York? Downtown?”

He credits Rent with being the show that made him want to write his own. “I went from someone who likes musicals, and if he saves enough money buys TKTS tickets on his birthday, to thinking, Oh, the truth can come out in a musical. You’re allowed to write musicals,” Miranda said in June, at a speech presented by global storytelling organization The Moth in partnership with Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance. “And that’s when I went from being a fan of musicals, from being a theater kid to trying to write musicals.”

Four years later, Miranda saw Tick, Tick … Boom! off Broadway and had a similar experience. “It felt like a message in a bottle just for me,” he said in that New Yorker interview. He was 21, a senior in college, and he could see already that his future was going to look a lot like Larson’s looked in the world of the show: working a crappy day job to get by, writing musicals in his off hours, watching as all his talented friends decided to give up the dream of making art and get real jobs.

Advertisement

“You’re going to be the only idiot smashing your head against their childhood dream,” he imagined the show saying to him. “And, if it’s worth it to you, it’s worth it. But it’s really fucking hard.”

“I went back and saw it three times,” Miranda said.

Miranda spent the next few years as he had foreseen, taking jobs with flexible hours (substitute teacher, jingle writer) and plugging away at the score for a musical. This musical was heavily influenced by Rent: set in the neighborhood where Miranda spent his days, and blending Broadway balladry with the kind of music he could hear on the radio. In Miranda’s case, that meant the musical was set in Washington Heights, and the music was Latin pop and hip-hop.

Advertisement

The show was called In the Heights, and as Miranda developed it, he leaned repeatedly on Larson’s legacy for inspiration and resources. Rent producer Jeffrey Seller, who had continued to look for musical theater composers who might be able to drag Broadway’s sound into the present, signed on to produce In the Heights in 2004. And as Miranda continued workshopping the show, he applied for the Jonathan Larson Grant for early-career musical theater writers. (He didn’t get it.)

“By writing about his friends with the problems and anxieties he felt, Jonathan Larson gave me permission to write about my life, hopes and fears,” Miranda wrote in his 2004 application. He added a line that echoed Larson’s old boast: “Quite frankly, I want to change the landscape of American musical theatre.”

Miranda, like Larson before him, succeeded at his ambition. In the Heights hit Broadway in 2008 to critical acclaim, moderate commercial success, four Tonys (including Best Musical), and a Grammy. It proved that Latin music and hip-hop could flourish on Broadway and that the Great White Way didn’t need to depend on sounds that had been thoroughly whitewashed.

Miranda kept working after the success of In the Heights. He continued writing musicals (Bring It On: The Musical hit Broadway in 2012), and he also picked up occasional acting gigs, like that 2014 Tick, Tick … Boom! He was already becoming a brand name by that point, but he still seemed to think of himself as a Larson-like figure, a striver who hasn’t quite hit it big yet. His performance in that revival, said the New York Times review, “throbs with a sense of bone-deep identification.” After all, the review went on, “not too many years ago, Mr. Miranda was himself a struggling young musical-theater composer living hand-to-mouth in New York, teaching high school English while scribbling songs on the side.”

In 2015, Miranda’s third musical, Hamilton, hit Broadway and was a runaway success. It won 11 Tonys (including Best Musical), a Grammy, and a Pulitzer. It landed Miranda a MacArthur genius grant. It made Broadway suddenly and stunningly relevant to mainstream popular culture. It was the biggest thing anyone could remember since, well … Rent.

Advertisement

Unlike Larson, Miranda lived to see his success.

“Will I make it to 40?”

It’s the idea of living to see your success that really connects Miranda and Larson. Beyond their shared ambitions and their biographical parallels, the connective tissue between their work is, fundamentally, a shared obsession with mortality and with what we leave behind.

Larson, mused Ben Brantley in the New York Times in 2001, “seems to have lived his life and composed his music to the rhythm of some cosmic metronome, noisily decapitating the seconds.” Rent is haunted by the impending death of one of its central characters, and its most celebrated song, “Seasons of Love,” counts out the days left in the last year of her life. In Tick, Tick … Boom!, Larson’s character Jon is obsessed with the idea that his time is running out, that he has a limited window left to produce a great musical and he still hasn’t done it.

Advertisement

Meanwhile, Miranda’s Hamilton is built around the problem of Hamilton’s forthcoming death: You know through the whole show that he’s going to die in a duel, and you’re just waiting to see how it happens. Hamilton himself keeps fantasizing about his own death; he’s fixated on the question of how he’ll be remembered after he dies, and on whether the work he’s doing is enough to build a legacy on. “How do you write like you’re running out of time?” Burr demands of Hamilton, and we in the audience know it’s because Hamilton believes that he is running out.

“See, I never thought I’d live past 20,” admits Miranda’s Hamilton.

“Will I make it to 40?” Jon asks in Tick, Tick … Boom!

Advertisement

Larson was explicit about why his work is so focused on death and dying. He was an artist in the late ’80s with a lot of friends who were HIV positive, and many of them died of AIDS. He was surrounded by death very young, and that shaped the way he thought about his life and his work.

Miranda, meanwhile, says he became fixated on death after experiencing a childhood tragedy: His best friend died in an accident when he was 4 years old, he said in that speech for The Moth, and what he remembers of his grief at that age is just “a year of gray.”

“When I was writing Hamilton and the line, ‘I imagine death so much it feels more like a memory’ popped out — that is not in Ron Chernow’s book. That is not in any history book,” he said. “That’s something coming out of me that makes me understand this person.” He felt the same way, he added, writing Burr’s line, “If there’s a reason that I’m still alive when everyone who loves me has died, I’m willing to wait for it.” He had found the thing that helped him lock into the character, and that was their shared grief, loss, and heightened awareness of mortality.

Advertisement

“​​I’m naturally drawn to people who feel that urgency,” Miranda explained to the New Yorker in November, “because I felt that urgency very acutely when I was younger.” Larson was one of those people who felt the urgency of the ticking clock.

It seems to be that shared sense of determination between Miranda and Larson that makes Miranda’s Tick, Tick … Boom! feel so tender, so affectionate: You’re able to empathize utterly with Larson’s fears of running out of time because Miranda understands them so well.

Under Miranda’s direction, the film becomes a tribute to ambition itself, to the panic of being young and talented and striving but not quite getting there yet.

Advertisement

It becomes a paean to writing like you’re running out of time and living like there’s no day but today.

Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Comentanos

WOW

Los fabricantes de whisky estadounidenses ponen sus ojos en Europa a medida que se levantan los aranceles de la era Trump

Published

on

Una mujer pasa junto a una exhibición de botellas de whisky en la destilería James E. Pepper.

Advertisement

Jeff Dean / NPR


ocultar leyenda

Advertisement

alternar subtítulo

Jeff Dean / NPR

Una mujer pasa junto a una exhibición de botellas de whisky en la destilería James E. Pepper.

Advertisement

Jeff Dean / NPR

Amir Peay tenía grandes esperanzas cuando rescató la destilería James E. Pepper abandonada de 140 años cerca del corazón de Lexington, Kentucky. Después de años de planificación y renovaciones, finalmente estuvo listo para producir whisky en el lugar en 2017. Pero las esperanzas de Peay se frustraron unos meses después, cuando la Unión Europea impuso aranceles al whisky estadounidense.

«Pensamos que realmente podríamos hacer crecer nuestro negocio allí», dice Peay. «Eso es, por supuesto, hasta junio de 2018 cuando, de la nada, el whisky estadounidense se vio arrastrado a una guerra comercial».

Advertisement

Amir Peay, propietario de la destilería James E. Pepper.

Jeff Dean / NPR


ocultar leyenda

Advertisement

alternar subtítulo

Jeff Dean / NPR

Advertisement

Advertisement

Pero ahora, los destiladores de Peay y whisky en los EE. UU. Están levantando sus vasos y poniendo sus miras, una vez más, en Europa. Estados Unidos y la Unión Europea anunciaron un acuerdo comercial el mes pasado que efectivamente levanta los aranceles del 25 por ciento sobre el whisky estadounidense a partir de enero.

Los aranceles, que se habían impuesto como parte de una creciente disputa comercial entre la administración Trump y la UE por el acero y el aluminio, también tenían como objetivo las exportaciones estadounidenses, como motocicletas y mezclilla, y obstaculizaron el crecimiento internacional de la floreciente industria estadounidense del whisky.

Destilería James E. Pepper.

Advertisement

Jeff Dean / NPR


ocultar leyenda

Advertisement

alternar subtítulo

Jeff Dean / NPR

Advertisement

El maestro destilador Aaron Schorsch recorre la destilería.

Jeff Dean / NPR


ocultar leyenda

Advertisement

alternar subtítulo

Jeff Dean / NPR

Advertisement

Europa es un importante importador de bebidas espirituosas estadounidenses, sin embargo, los destiladores vieron una disminución del 53% en las exportaciones de whisky estadounidense al Reino Unido y una disminución del 37% a la UE mientras estaban vigentes los aranceles, lo que resultó en más de $ 300 millones en ingresos perdidos, según el Consejo de Destilados.

Luego, COVID-19 exacerbó el dolor de los pequeños destiladores, ya que se vieron obligados a cerrar sus puertas a los recorridos y degustaciones, y los bares y restaurantes cerraron.

Advertisement

«Al principio, cuando ocurrió la pandemia, ya sabes, yo y nosotros, como empresa, estábamos muy, muy nerviosos y asustados», dice Peay, y agrega que los bares y restaurantes constituían casi la mitad de su negocio en ese momento.

El maestro destilador Aaron Schorsch inspecciona el puré.

Jeff Dean / NPR

Advertisement


ocultar leyenda

alternar subtítulo

Advertisement

Jeff Dean / NPR

El maestro destilador Aaron Schorsch pesa contenedores de centeno.

Advertisement

Jeff Dean / NPR


ocultar leyenda

Advertisement

alternar subtítulo

Jeff Dean / NPR

Advertisement

La destilería giró hacia las ventas minoristas. Y con más personas bebiendo en casa durante la pandemia, la compañía vendió un número récord de cajas de whisky en 2020, dice Peay.

«Tuvimos un crecimiento interno muy fuerte», dice Peay. «Pero nos hizo cambiar la forma en que queríamos asignar las acciones a Europa, y alteró lo que iba a ser nuestra trayectoria de crecimiento en Europa».

El centeno se transfiere de un silo a contenedores de almacenamiento.

Advertisement

Jeff Dean / NPR


ocultar leyenda

Advertisement

alternar subtítulo

Jeff Dean / NPR

Advertisement

Podría ser difícil para los destiladores artesanales más pequeños recuperar el espacio que perdieron en los estantes de las tiendas europeas cuando se impusieron las tarifas, ahora que los distribuidores han ajustado sus estrategias de compra.

Advertisement

«Una vez que estás fuera de los estantes, es como 300 veces más difícil volver a subir», dice Sonat Birnecker Hart, presidente de la destilería Koval en Chicago, Illinois.

El empleado de la destilería Cody Giles, a la izquierda, usa una carretilla elevadora para recoger un contenedor de malta.

Jeff Dean / NPR

Advertisement


ocultar leyenda

alternar subtítulo

Advertisement

Jeff Dean / NPR

Las botellas se encuentran en la línea de embotellado en la destilería James E. Pepper.

Advertisement

Jeff Dean / NPR


ocultar leyenda

Advertisement

alternar subtítulo

Jeff Dean / NPR

Advertisement

Hart dice que Koval decidió mantener sus precios estables, esencialmente comiendo el costo excesivo de las tarifas, para mantener las relaciones existentes.

«Tuvimos que demostrarles que estábamos en esto a largo plazo», dice Hart.

Entonces, cuando la administración Biden anunció que había llegado a un acuerdo con la UE para levantar los aranceles, Hart vio motivos para celebrar.

Advertisement

“Sacamos los cócteles de bourbon para brindar por que los aranceles se habían ido” dice Hart. «Habiendo dicho eso, todavía hay trabajo por hacer».

Las cajas se apilan en la destilería James E. Pepper.

Jeff Dean / NPR

Advertisement


ocultar leyenda

alternar subtítulo

Advertisement

Jeff Dean / NPR

Travis Kitchens ofrece un vuelo de degustación en la destilería James E. Pepper.

Advertisement

Jeff Dean / NPR


ocultar leyenda

Advertisement

alternar subtítulo

Jeff Dean / NPR

Advertisement

Especialmente cuando se trata de Gran Bretaña. El Reino Unido ya no es parte de la UE, gracias al Brexit, y aún tiene que eliminar sus aranceles sobre el whisky estadounidense.

Sin embargo, Amir Peay en Lexington se muestra optimista de que se llegará a un acuerdo y aumentará la demanda de whisky estadounidense.

«No es un interruptor de luz. No podemos simplemente apretarlo e inmediatamente simplemente, ‘Volvamos a lo que teníamos’», dice. «No estoy seguro sobre 2022, pero estoy seguro de que 2023 y más allá … Es un futuro muy brillante para el whisky estadounidense en Europa».

Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading

WOW

Obtenga Ninja Foodi Grill por $ 70 de descuento en Bed Bath & Beyond ahora mismo

Published

on

Nuestro equipo está dedicado a encontrar y contarle más sobre los productos y ofertas que amamos. Si también los ama y decide comprar a través de los enlaces a continuación, es posible que recibamos una comisión. Los precios y la disponibilidad están sujetos a cambios.

Si bien las ollas instantáneas y las freidoras tienden a ocupar un lugar central cuando se habla de electrodomésticos de cocina innovadores, hay otro que se destaca entre el resto: el Ninja Foodi Grill. Y ahora mismo, puedes conseguirlo a la venta en Bed Bath & Beyond por $ 61 de descuento.

Advertisement

Durante la venta del Black Friday de Bed Bath & Beyond, puede encontrar toneladas de electrodomésticos y utensilios de cocina con hasta un 50% de descuento. Además, puede obtener un 25% de descuento en todo su pedido y envío gratis en pedidos superiores a $ 19. Sin embargo, el Ninja Foodi Grill es definitivamente un punto culminante de la venta.

Ninja Foodi Grill tiene cinco funciones de cocción diferentes, lo que lo hace bastante especial. Primero, es una parrilla de interior, que probablemente podría haber adivinado por el nombre. En segundo lugar, y quizás lo más emocionante, también es una freidora. Y si eso no es suficiente, también puede hornear, asar y deshidratar alimentos.

Digamos que quiere una hamburguesa y papas fritas para la cena; esta máquina lo tiene cubierto. Y si olvidó descongelar dicha hamburguesa, no es gran cosa, porque transformará su hamburguesa congelada en una perfectamente asada a la parrilla en unos 25 minutos.

Advertisement

Parrilla Ninja Foodi 5 en 1, $ 169 (Orig. $ 229.99)

Crédito: Bed Bath & Beyond

Ninja Foodi Grill es un éxito de ventas y se vende por $ 229.99, pero actualmente está a la venta por $ 61 de descuento en Bed Bath & Beyond para el Black Friday. Si bien el precio es un poco elevado, no está mal considerando lo que costaría comprar una parrilla interior, una freidora y un deshidratador de alimentos por separado.

De las 1.044 calificaciones de Bed Bath & Beyond, el 93 por ciento de los compradores le otorgó una calificación de cinco estrellas. Y las críticas son entusiastas.

“Esta cosa es asombrosa. Cocina salmón congelado en 7 a 10 minutos, fríe al aire papas fritas congeladas y tots rápidamente y cocina el pollo a la perfección. Lo usará a menudo ”, escribió un crítico de Bed Bath & Beyond.

Advertisement

“Me encanta este electrodoméstico. Se ha convertido rápidamente en una de mis vías favoritas para cocinar tanto carnes como verduras ”, escribió otro crítico. “Me encanta especialmente el aspecto de la parrilla. ¡Se calienta, asa la comida y sabe muy bien! También me encanta lo rápido y fácil que es limpiarlo «.

Los críticos menos entusiastas del electrodoméstico señalaron que es bastante grande (17 pulgadas x 14 pulgadas x 11 pulgadas), y aunque les gustaron la mayoría de las funciones de la máquina, la parrilla no siempre está totalmente libre de humo, especialmente cuando se cocina carne.

Puede comprar Ninja Foodi Grill arriba y obtener más información sobre sus cinco increíbles funciones a continuación.

Advertisement

1. Grill

No desacredite las capacidades de asado de Ninja Foodi Grill solo porque está diseñado para cocinar en interiores. La parrilla tiene lo que la marca llama «Tecnología de parrilla ciclónica», que básicamente significa que se calienta hasta 500 ° F y, a medida que se cocinan los alimentos, el aire circula a su alrededor para lograr un dorado perfecto. Las rejillas de parrilla antiadherentes de 10 x 10 pulgadas se adaptan a cuatro hamburguesas de 8 onzas o cuatro pechugas de pollo de 7 onzas. Y de acuerdo con la descripción del producto, también tiene tecnología de control de humo para limitar la cantidad de humo que produce.

2. Air Fry

El Ninja Foodi tiene una canasta para verduras con revestimiento de cerámica de 4 cuartos para freír su comida al aire. En comparación con la fritura profunda, este proceso utiliza un 75 por ciento menos de aceite, por lo que no solo es más saludable, sino que se ensucia menos. Además, no necesita preocuparse por dónde desechar el aceite de cocina.

3. Hornear

La parrilla tiene un botón de «hornear» y viene con una olla para cocinar antiadherente con revestimiento de cerámica de 6 cuartos de galón, que se puede usar para hornear postres, verduras, carnes y más.

Advertisement

4. Asar

Usando el botón «asar» y una olla de cocción de 6 cuartos, también puede asar su comida. La olla es lo suficientemente grande como para caber un pollo de tres libras.

5. Deshidratar

El botón «deshidratar» probablemente no sea la característica más popular de Ninja Foodi Grill, pero puede usarlo para crear chips de manzana o col rizada crujientes y más.

Si te gustó esta historia, echa un vistazo a las mejores ofertas de cocina para comprar este Black Friday.

Advertisement

Más de In The Know:

Los hermosos bolsos de Kate Spade tienen hasta un 50% de descuento para el Black Friday: los precios comienzan en solo $ 59

No se pierda grandes ahorros en freidoras, ollas a presión, parrillas y más en la oferta de Ninja Black Friday: los precios son de hasta $ 150 de descuento

Advertisement

¡La oferta del Black Friday de DICK’s Sporting Goods está aquí! Obtenga hasta un 50% de descuento en Nike, adidas, Under Armour y más

Dyson acaba de poner a la venta 2 de sus aspiradoras inalámbricas más vendidas para el Black Friday: tienen un descuento de $ 50 solo por tiempo limitado

Escuche el último episodio de nuestro podcast de cultura pop, We Should Talk:

Advertisement

Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading

WOW

Libros que amamos: Ari Shapiro elige ‘Build Your House Around My Body’

Published

on

La lista 2021 NPR Books We Love está aquí. Ari Shapiro de NPR comparte uno de sus libros favoritos de este año, Construye tu casa alrededor de mi cuerpo por Violet Kupersmith.



Advertisement

ARI SHAPIRO, ANFITRIÓN:

Hoy, NPR presentó una herramienta que los fanáticos de los libros esperan cada año. Solíamos llamarlo el Conserje de libros. Ahora son Books We Love: cientos de títulos recomendados por el personal de NPR y otros revisores, que se pueden ordenar con etiquetas como The Dark Side o Tales From Around The World.

Ambos filtros describen un libro que elegí este año. «Construye tu casa alrededor de mi cuerpo» es de la novelista primeriza Violet Kupersmith. Anteriormente escribió una colección de cuentos y ambos presentan fantasmas. Así que le pregunté a Kupersmith a principios de este año por qué le interesa lo sobrenatural.

Advertisement

VIOLET KUPERSMITH: Cuando escribí «The Frangipani Hotel», la colección de cuentos, estaba muy interesado en la metáfora del fantasma como una especie de sustituto del inmigrante porque pensé, oh, es una figura tan perfecta, el fantasma, que está como atrapado entre mundos y realmente no pertenece a ningún lado. Pero con la novela me atrajo más el fantasma como forma de venganza y como figura que tiene esa agencia que les fue negada en la vida.

SHAPIRO: «Construye tu casa alrededor de mi cuerpo» comienza con la desaparición de una joven llamada Winnie. Luego, retrocede en el tiempo. Winnie tiene mucho en común con Kupersmith. Ambas son mujeres vietnamitas estadounidenses de origen racial mixto que se mudaron a Vietnam cuando tenían poco más de 20 años.

KUPERSMITH: Quería explorar la angustia de ser lastimado de alguna manera y cómo ocupa un pequeño rincón de ti. Es tu pequeño fantasma personal en la casa embrujada de tu mente. Y me sentí angustiado cuando regresé a Estados Unidos después de vivir en Vietnam durante unos tres años, principalmente por la violencia que vi contra las mujeres perpetrada contra mis amigos, contra mí, la misoginia cotidiana que te agota. Y se sintió como un espíritu dentro de ti. Entonces, el libro fue una especie de mi propia manera de realizar un exorcismo en mí mismo.

Advertisement

SHAPIRO: Esta es una novela extensa que abarca generaciones, y tiene algunas piezas familiares de las películas de terror de Hollywood y los cuentos de hadas de los hermanos Grimm, como un exorcismo y un bosque encantado. Pero debido a que este libro está ambientado en Vietnam, el bosque es una plantación de árboles de caucho cubierto de maleza. El exorcismo no tiene crucifijos ni agua bendita. Kupersmith me dijo que en realidad se inspiró en la experiencia de presenciar un exorcismo vietnamita.

KUPERSMITH: Pero en la vida real, fue mucho menos intenso. Y resultó que el fantasma era vegetariano. Y por eso estaba disgustado por las ofrendas de pollo que estaba – que se le dejaba.

SHAPIRO: Oh.

Advertisement

KUPERSMITH: Y por eso estaba causando problemas.

SHAPIRO: Sabes, estás sentado en los suburbios de Filadelfia, y yo en Washington, DC Y estás diciendo que el fantasma era vegetariano y estaba molesto por las ofrendas de pollo, de las que parece fácil reírse. Pero imagino que, en el momento, se sintió muy real. Quizás todavía se sienta muy real. ¿Cómo logras salvar eso?

KUPERSMITH: Oh, siempre me parece real. Y los fantasmas y las historias de fantasmas era algo con lo que yo crecí. Y creo en los fantasmas, y no creo que escribiría tanto sobre ellos si no lo hiciera.

Advertisement

SHAPIRO: Violet Kupersmith en su novela «Construye tu casa alrededor de mi cuerpo». Es uno de los cientos de libros recomendados por NPR que encontrará en npr.org/bookswelove.

Copyright © 2021 NPR. Reservados todos los derechos. Visite las páginas de términos de uso y permisos de nuestro sitio web en www.npr.org para obtener más información.

Verb8tm, Inc., un contratista de NPR, crea las transcripciones de NPR en una fecha límite urgente, y se producen mediante un proceso de transcripción patentado desarrollado con NPR. Este texto puede no estar en su forma final y puede ser actualizado o revisado en el futuro. La precisión y la disponibilidad pueden variar. El registro autorizado de la programación de NPR es el registro de audio.

Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading

Facebook

¿Búscas empleo?

Videos

Lo más visto