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This Online Page Is Shaming Bad Architecture And Here’s 70 Of The Biggest Fails Posted There

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Some buildings will absolutely fascinate you with their stunning designs, genius architectural decisions, and the sheer power of their aesthetics. This article isn’t about these kinds of buildings, however. Nope! Not all buildings are made equal, you see, and the ‘bad’ ones need to be shamed publicly so that others don’t copy their designs. So we’ll be focusing exclusively on just plain terrible architectural decisions.

And the worst of the worst end up on the ‘That’s It, I’m Architecture Shaming’ Facebook group where users mercilessly prod and poke bad design. It’s fun, it’s educational, it’s something cool to scroll through during your next coffee break.

Remember to upvote your fave photos that you love to hate and be sure to follow the architecture-shaming Facebook group if you like their stuff. They’re a growing community with awesome content.

Bored Panda spoke about what separates good and bad design, the need to democratize the access to quirky private property designs, as well as about the roles that architecture plays with an expert in the field from Sweden who has a background in urban planning. You’ll find our full interview with her below.

#1 I Dunno, Slim Doesn’t Seem To Be Digging This Situation

Image credits: architectureshaming

#2 This Pillar Was Straight Last Week. This Is The First Floor Of A Seven-Floor Building

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#3 I Do Not Give A Damn How Well It’s Cantilevered Or How Strong The Struts Are. I Do Not Have The Kind Of Luck It Would Take To Set Foot In This House

Image credits: architectureshaming

The Sweden-based urban planning expert explained to Bored Panda that while public spaces must meet safety and accessibility standards, aesthetic standards can be much more fluid for buildings. The expert spoke to Bored Panda on the condition that she remain anonymous. (Remember, just because you’re an expert in something and want to be helpful doesn’t mean that you always like the limelight… unlike quirky architecture which just begs you to look at it!)

“Most of the time, the elements of the built environment should be in harmony amidst each other and with the surroundings. However, sometimes, something bolder and out-of-the-box might form an engaging contrast,” she said. However, the urban planning expert shared with Bored Panda that, in her personal opinion, our built environments have to engage us, as well as stimulate our minds and senses. In fact, she believes that architecture’s ability to make us think is one of its most powerful aspects.

#4 The Cactus Is *chef’s Kiss

Image credits: architectureshaming

#5 That Gives Me Anxiety

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#6 This Is Not Photoshopped

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“There are circumstances where the architecture should create a sense of calmness and safety, yet there are instances in which it is not bad if the architecture provokes us and makes us think, ‘Why don’t I like the look of this building?’”

The urban planner said that we should give people the freedom to express themselves as they wish when it comes to designing their private property. As long as they have the means, nearly everything is allowed, in her opinion.

#7 Opera And Ballet Theatre Of Cheboksary (Russia)

Top: original picture
Bottom: slightly photoshopped picture

Image credits: architectureshaming

#8 I Might Like This If Those Were Slides

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#9 This Looks Like A Place A Villain Would Live

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“Quirky architecture comes from our innate desire to demonstrate our uniqueness. However, not everyone who has the means has an average taste for aesthetics. Yet, as long as it is for the people who inhabit or use their private space, I mean why not?” she told Bored Panda that as long as you’re not actively harming anyone else with how bad your designs are, you should be able to be as unique as you want. Even if it falls short of objective aesthetic standards.

#10 A Friend Of Mine Cross-Posted This And It Made Me Think Of Y’all

Image credits: architectureshaming

#11 Who Remembers Those Gerbil Enclosures That Look Like This?

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#12 I’ll Meet Your Brutalism, And Raise You This

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However, the expert acknowledged that others in the industry might not see things the way that she does. Others, she said, believe that private property must be in harmony with the surroundings.

“But, I think that we should not cross that thin line where architecture becomes reserved for only the wealthy and for those with ‘good taste’ (whoever decides that). I’m only talking about private property here, though. When it comes to public space, there should be a consensus between the public and the professional about the design,” she said that the rules for the private and public spheres are very different.

#13 A House I Used To Drive Past In A Little Iowa Town. All I Ever Heard From Locals Was That This Place Had A Terrible Leaking Problem When It Rained

Image credits: architectureshaming

#14 The “Snail House” In Bulgaria Actually Does Look Like A Snail

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#15 Art Nouveau On Psychedelics

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The urban planning expert also had some advice when it comes to design. “Firstly, even though I often advocate for unconventionally looking buildings, I do not encourage purposefully provocative architecture. The building should be designed with the intention to accommodate and protect society. It should create a sense of safety but not be boring,” she told Bored Panda that we ought to strike a balance between uniqueness and service, expression and community.

#16 Toilet-Shaped House (Named Haewoojae), Built By Sim Jae-Duck, The Chairman Of The Organizing Committee Of The Inaugural General Assembly Of The World Toilet Association

Image credits: architectureshaming

#17 “Sharkitecture”

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#18 Um… What Is This?

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What’s more, the expert from Sweden pointed out that accessibility, inclusiveness, and empowerment should also be key features of any architectural project. “Also, I prefer somewhat complex but systemic designs. Minimalistic and box like floor plans are good in some cases where easy access is necessary (for example, hospitals) yet they can be completely mind-numbing while more complex floor plan designs are more mind-stimulating (for example, good for schools, in my opinion).”

#19 Bangkok’s Elephant Building. The Tusks Are A Bowling Alley In My Imagination

Image credits: architectureshaming

#20 You Too Can Have Your Own White Castle

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#21 This Building Has My City In A Uproar

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At the time of writing, the ‘That’s It, I’m Architecture Shaming’ community had 64.1k members. However, it’s growing so rapidly, that by the time you’re reading this, dear Pandas, that number could be much, much higher. Just in the last week alone, the group grew by over 7.3k members. And they’ve made upwards of a thousand posts in the last month.

#22 I Will Haunt Your Dreams! Residential Building In Belgium

Image credits: architectureshaming

#23 I Wonder Who Thought This Would Be A Good Idea

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#24 I Think Syndrome From The Incredibles Lived Here

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Because of this fast growth and the issues that came with it, the administrator of the ‘Architecture Shaming’ group, Oregon-based Matthew Brühn, addressed the community and the changes that took place in April. In short, the rules are much more structured now.

#25 Interesting Concept

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#26 Please Don’t Take It Too Seriously, Just A Surprised House

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#27 They Drew The Line At A Fountain In The Kitchen

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Matthew pointed out that the admins have been getting tired of the “massive influx of negativity” that came with more and more members joining the community. While the admin expressed his admiration for how wonderful many members are, he also noted that the group will start filtering out overly-aggressive posts.

#28 Spotted This Gem In Tel Aviv

Image credits: architectureshaming

#29 This Is Plane Awesome

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#30 Can We All Just Take A Moment And Acknowledge That Prince Produced Some Great Music, But He Lived In A Water Treatment Station

Image credits: architectureshaming

“Don’t take it personally; we’re just trying to create an atmosphere where we can all have fun and be kind. There’s now the equivalent of a small city of us all here now, so that will be more difficult,” Matthew pointed out. He added that mentions of politics and religion will be deleted while all potential new members have to answer some questions before they get in. Which, at the end of the day, leads to a friendlier and happier community that, we’re sure, plenty of you Pandas will want to join.

#31 Saw This On A Walk Today. A Table Lamp, In A Glass Box, Hanging From The Roof Of A Carport

Image credits: architectureshaming

#32 Why?

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#33 The Glorious Flower Of Communist Brutalism That Is The Former Central Post Office In Skopje, Macedonia. Some People Want It Preserved

#34 Kind Of Reminds Me Of A Church (Granted, A Strange One) But It’s Actually A House With A 6,000 Sq. Ft. Garage… And Its Own Car Wash

Image credits: architectureshaming

#35 Forbidden Waffle In Santiago

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#36 Surrealist Neighborhood

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#37 Just

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#38 Car Dealership Trying For More Of A Classy Look!

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#39 This Place Is All Curb Appeal

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#40 I Think They Put A Bath Where A Closet Was

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#41 I’ve Been Looking At Homes Trying To Get Ideas For When We Move In A Few Years And I Came Across A House That Was Perfect In Every Way Except One

What in the ever living fudge is this – one pass thru is ‘eh, but this one has three-at different levels plus the added detriment of the worlds worst architectural detailing around it. Please someone else tell me that you hate this as much as I do. I know it’s probably more interior design but it’s just so ugly.

Image credits: architectureshaming

#42 No, Because I Need To See Actually Bad Architecture And Not Just Something That’s Historic Or Non-Traditional

Image credits: architectureshaming

#43 This Bothers Me

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#44 Victorian Balusters With Greek Columns. This Is So American It’s Painful

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#45 Has Anyone Ever Brought Up How Hideous Boston’s Logan Atc Tower Is?

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#46 Keeping The Old Facade Because The Law Says So

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#47 Here’s A Building In Pittsburgh. They Tore Down The Church But Left The Steeple. Built An Insensitive Building Behind It

Image credits: architectureshaming

#48 Saint Benedict Church, Andrelândia, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Built In 1989

Image credits: architectureshaming

#49 I Appreciate Efforts At Creativity, Sustainability, Affordability. I Really Do. But Do They Have To Be So Ugly? This Looks Like A Bad Public Washroom

Image credits: architectureshaming

#50 I Don’t Think A Paint Job And Landscaper Would Help This Poor House Down The Street From Me

Image credits: architectureshaming

#51 Pensacola House

#52 “The Clients Insisted On A Big Window In What Must Now Be The Least Discreet Bathroom In Melbourne.” Note The Train

There are no blinds or curtains. apparently people on the train call the hotel downstairs & ask if they know they are baring all

Image credits: architectureshaming

#53 I Mean, Come On

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#54 I Never Realized How Important It Is For The Roof To Hang Over A Little Bit

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#55 Neighbors Had Some Material Left, Contractor Cut Them A Deal On A Monstrosity

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#56 Warsaw. Poland. Don’t Know Why

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#57 I’m At The Pizza Hut I’m At The Mod Suburban Home I’m At The Pizza Hut / Mod Suburban Home

Image credits: architectureshaming

#58 Concorde De Luxe Resort In Turkey

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#59 If You Want To Live In A Cheesecake Factory And You Enjoy Really Drafty Showers

Image credits: architectureshaming

#60 I Give You, The Most Boring Roof Ever Built And A House With Very Little Natural Light Coming In

Image credits: architectureshaming

#61 This. The Building I Hate Most In Dallas And I Have To Look At It Every Time I Drive To Work

Looks like something a four year old would build in Minecraft but, no, someone actually got paid to design this butt ugly monstrosity that blocks an otherwise cool view of downtown.

Image credits: architectureshaming

#62 Oh, I Live In A Gated Community. It’s Very Posh

Image credits: architectureshaming

#63 Feast Your Eyes On This Mcmansion Beast. Complete With Roof Nub Quartet, Stupid Turret, And Parasitic Garage

Image credits: architectureshaming

#64 Just In Case You Ever Wanted To Open A Drive-Thru From Your Crib

Image credits: architectureshaming

#65 This Building Has Been In My Hometown For Ages, But I Never Noticed It Until I Joined This Group

Image credits: architectureshaming

#66 Another In The Bizarre San Francisco Tradition Of Stucco Treatments That Look Like Skin Diseases. The Kitchen Is To Die For — The Facade Doesn’t Deserve That Attention To Detail?

Image credits: architectureshaming

#67 House I Found While Browsing Properties In Melbourne, Australia

Image credits: architectureshaming

#68 Whatttttt Is Thissssss. The Front Of The House Looks Like It’s Made Of The Spare Parts From The Other Builds

Image credits: architectureshaming

#69 The Asymmetry Would Drive Me Nuts

Image credits: architectureshaming

#70 The “Blender” On The Campus Of The University Of Oklahoma. That’s All One Building. I Took Math Classes In This Thing Back In The 90s

Image credits: architectureshaming

 

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Un asunto familiar de ‘noche de jazz’: saxofonistas de padre e hijo Mike y Julian Lee

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Saxofonistas Mike y Julian Lee

Christopher Drukker / Artista


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Christopher Drukker / Artista

Saxofonistas Mike y Julian Lee

Christopher Drukker / Artista

Como joven aspirante a saxofonista, Julian Lee solía ser presentado como «el hijo de Mike». Su padre, Mike Lee, tiene una excelente reputación como educador de jazz y como saxofonista en bandas lideradas por pesos pesados ​​como Jimmy Heath y Oliver Lake.

Después de presentarle a Julian el saxofón alrededor de los 7 años, «podía tocar de inmediato», dice Mike Lee. «Fue loco.» Y así comenzó un viaje en cohete, impulsando a Julian a través del programa de jazz en Juilliard y hacia la escena contemporánea.

En esta edición del Día del Padre de Noche de Jazz, escucharemos de Mike y Julian sobre cómo su relación ha dado forma a su música y ha evolucionado con el tiempo; algo de música del álbum más reciente de Mike, Otro paso, con Julian en tenor y otro hijo, Matt, en la batería; y pasaremos por un par de sets en Dizzy’s Club, uno con Mike con el pianista y colaborador habitual Loston Harris, otro con Julian detrás de un compañero consumado, el pianista Isaiah J. Thompson.

«Julian es alma absoluta», afirma uno de sus mentores, Wynton Marsalis, en un momento de este episodio de Noche de Jazz en América.

Al final, quedará claro por qué Mike se enorgullece de haber escuchado recientemente que se refieren a sí mismo como: «el padre de Julian».

Mike y Julian Lee

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Mike y Julian Lee

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Músicos:

Cuarteto Isaiah J. Thompson: Isaiah J. Thompson, piano; Julian Lee, saxofón tenor; Philip Norris, bajo; y Domo Branch, batería.

Trío de Loston Harris: Loston Harris, piano; Mike Lee, saxofón tenor; Gianluca Renzi, bajo

«¡Oye, Lock!» de Mike Lee Canción para todos nosotros: Mike Lee, saxofón tenor; Julian Lee, saxofón tenor; Ed Howard, bajo; Matt Lee, batería

«Shortstops» de Mike Lee Canción para todos nosotros: Mike Lee, saxofón tenor; Julian Lee, saxofón tenor; Ed Howard, bajo; Lenny White, batería.

The Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra con Wynton Marsalis: Sherman Irby, saxofón alto; Ted Nash, saxofón alto; Victor Goines, saxofón tenor; Julian Lee, saxofón tenor; Paul Nedzela; saxofón barítono; Ryan Kisor, trompeta; Kenny Rampton, trompeta; Marcus Printup, trompeta; Wynton Marsalis, trompeta; Jonah Moss, trompeta; Kasperi Sarikoski, trombón; Sam Chess, trombón; Elliot Mason, trombón; James Chirillo, guitarra; Dan Nimmer, piano; Carlos Henriquez, bajo; Marion Felder, batería.

Lista de conjuntos:

  • Isaiah J. Thompson Quartet, «Cuentos del elefante y la mariposa» (Thompson)
  • Loston Harris Trio, «Frame Works» (Harris)
  • Mike Lee, «¡Oye, Lock!» (Eddie «Lockjaw» Davis)
  • Mike Lee, «Campocortos» (Lee)
  • The Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra con Wynton Marsalis, «Blue and Sentimental» (Count Basie, Mack David, Jerry Livingston)
  • Isaiah J. Thompson Quartet, «Mikula Blues» (Thompson)

Créditos:

Escritor y productor: Alex Ariff; Anfitrión: Christian McBride; Ingeniero musical de JALC: Rob Macomber; Gerente de proyecto: Suraya Mohamed; Productor principal: Katie Simon; Productores ejecutivos: Anya Grundmann y Gabrielle Armand

Un agradecimiento especial a Patrick Bartley Jr., Kay Wolf y Melissa Walker de Jazz House Kids.

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El ‘truco de la vida’ de los espaguetis, como muchos ‘trucos de la vida’ de comida recientes, es un desastre gigante

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El ‘truco de la vida’ de los espaguetis, como muchos ‘trucos de la vida’ de comida recientes, es un desastre gigante

Evidentemente, los creadores de contenido de la extraña Internet no pueden dejar de tirar comida en sus encimeras. Hace varios meses, un Ultimate Nacho Hack se volvió viral después de que una mujer simplemente arrojara un montón de ingredientes de nacho en su encimera y luego lo triturara todo junto con sus manos. Ahora, otra mujer ha hecho esencialmente lo mismo, esta vez con espaguetis y albóndigas.

Si ha visto alguno de estos videos recientes de abominación alimentaria viral, ya sabe lo que implica el video anterior: una mujer arroja un montón de ingredientes en su mostrador. «¡Es mucho más fácil de esta manera!» dice, mientras descarga un frasco entero de salsa prego. Luego vienen las albóndigas, vertidas en la cama de salsa, seguidas de queso y, finalmente, espaguetis humeantes. «¡No desorden!» dice mientras exalta este pecado ante Dios y el hombre.

Al igual que otros videos de comida recientes —el helado de tocador, el Spaghetti-O Pie, los macarrones con queso en la encimera, etc.— se volvió viral cuando la gente cuestionó si Dios permanece en el cielo por temor a lo que creó.

Sin embargo, una reacción general de disgusto no es lo único que estos videos tienen en común: una investigación de Eater descubrió que provienen de una red de Rick Lax, un mago y creador de contenido que ha estado haciendo populares videos de clickbait-y en Facebook. durante años. Lax le dice a Eater que insiste en que los videos no tienen la intención de ser asquerosos o volverse virales por ser repugnantes. Más bien, sostiene que son algo prácticos, aunque ridículos. El escritor de Eater Ryan Broderick teoriza que los videos son como videos de bromas que tienden a funcionar bien en la plataforma.

«Los videos que funcionan bien en Facebook tienden a tener algún tipo de recompensa … Hay una receta que es fácil de seguir, y sabes que al final verás lo que se ha cocinado. Los videos de broma funcionan de la misma manera. La broma está establecida, y luego esperas a ver qué sucede cuando finalmente se activa. Lax y sus colaboradores han combinado un video de broma y un video de cocina en algo que la gente realmente no puede apartar la vista, el equivalente culinario de una extracción de granos «.

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Aumentan inundaciones repentinas que amenazan la vida en el camino de Claudette

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Esta foto proporcionada por Alicia Jossey muestra escombros cubriendo la calle en East Brewton, Alabama, el sábado 19 de junio de 2021. Las autoridades de Alabama dicen que un presunto tornado provocado por la tormenta tropical Claudette demolió o dañó gravemente al menos 50 casas en la pequeña ciudad justo al norte de la frontera de Florida.

Alicia Jossey vía AP / AP


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Alicia Jossey vía AP / AP

Esta foto proporcionada por Alicia Jossey muestra escombros cubriendo la calle en East Brewton, Alabama, el sábado 19 de junio de 2021. Las autoridades de Alabama dicen que un presunto tornado provocado por la tormenta tropical Claudette demolió o dañó gravemente al menos 50 casas en la pequeña ciudad justo al norte de la frontera de Florida.

Alicia Jossey vía AP / AP

NUEVA ORLEANS (AP) – Los meteorólogos advirtieron sobre inundaciones repentinas que amenazan la vida en partes del sur profundo, particularmente en el centro de Alabama, mientras la depresión tropical Claudette viajaba por los estados costeros la madrugada del domingo.

Las fuertes lluvias llevaron a la marea alta desde el sábado hasta la madrugada del domingo en las áreas metropolitanas de Birmingham y Tuscaloosa.

Más de 20 personas fueron rescatadas en barco debido a las inundaciones en Northport, Alabama. WVUA-TV informó. La Agencia de Manejo de Emergencias del Condado de Tuscaloosa tuiteó que los voluntarios locales de la Cruz Roja estaban disponibles para ayudar a los afectados.

Y, el capitán del Servicio de Rescate y Bomberos de Birmingham, Bryan Harrell, dijo a los medios de comunicación que se estaba realizando una búsqueda de un hombre que posiblemente fue arrastrado por las inundaciones.

Village Creek en Ensley cercano se elevó por encima del nivel de inundación a 13 pies (4 metros), el Servicio Meteorológico Nacional en Birmingham tuiteó.

Las condiciones rápidamente cambiantes se produjeron cuando Claudette comenzaba a golpear partes de Georgia y las Carolinas la madrugada del domingo.

El sistema estaba ubicado a unas 85 millas (135 kilómetros) al oeste-suroeste de Atlanta, con vientos sostenidos de 30 mph (45 kph). Se movía de este a noreste a 13 mph (20 kph), dijo el Centro Nacional de Huracanes en un aviso el domingo por la mañana.

Una advertencia de tormenta tropical estaba vigente en Carolina del Norte desde Little River Inlet hasta la ciudad de Duck en Outer Banks. Se emitió una alerta de tormenta tropical en South Santee River, Carolina del Sur, a Little River Inlet, dijeron los meteorólogos.

Se esperaba que Claudette cruzara hacia el Océano Atlántico el lunes y recuperara la fuerza de la tormenta tropical en el este de Carolina del Norte.

Claudette fue declarada lo suficientemente organizada como para calificar como tormenta tropical con nombre la madrugada del sábado, mucho después de que el centro de circulación de la tormenta llegara a la costa al suroeste de Nueva Orleans.

Poco después de tocar tierra, un presunto tornado provocado por la tormenta demolió o dañó gravemente al menos 50 casas en un pequeño pueblo de Alabama, al norte de la frontera con Florida.

El alguacil Heath Jackson en el condado de Escambia dijo que un presunto tornado «casi arrasó» un parque de casas móviles, derribó árboles en las casas y arrancó el techo de un gimnasio de una escuela secundaria. La mayor parte del daño se produjo en o cerca de las ciudades de Brewton y East Brewton, a unas 48 millas (77 kilómetros) al norte de Pensacola, Florida.

«Afectó a todo el mundo», dijo Jackson. «Pero con esas casas móviles que se construyen tan cerca unas de otras, puede afectarles mucho más que en las casas que están separadas».

No hubo informes inmediatos de lesiones graves o muertes.

Los daños de la tormenta también se sintieron en el norte de Florida, donde los vientos, que en algunos casos alcanzaron las 85 mph (137 kph), hicieron que un camión de 18 ruedas volcara de costado.

Danny Gonzales, a la derecha, se para frente a su casa inundada con su vecino Bob Neal, molesto con los camiones de la compañía eléctrica que atraviesan el vecindario inundado empujando agua hacia su casa, después de que pasara la tormenta tropical Claudette, en Slidell, Luisiana, el sábado 19 de junio de 2021.

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Gerald Herbert / AP

Danny Gonzales, a la derecha, se para frente a su casa inundada con su vecino Bob Neal, molesto con los camiones de la compañía eléctrica que atraviesan el vecindario inundado empujando agua hacia su casa, después de que pasara la tormenta tropical Claudette, en Slidell, Luisiana, el sábado 19 de junio de 2021.

Gerald Herbert / AP

La tormenta también arrojó lluvias al norte del lago Pontchartrain en Louisiana y a lo largo de la costa de Mississippi, inundando calles y, en algunas áreas, empujando agua hacia los hogares. Más tarde, la tormenta estaba empapando el Panhandle de Florida y, tierra adentro, una amplia extensión de Alabama.

Los meteorólogos dijeron que el sistema podría arrojar de 5 a 10 pulgadas (12 a 25 centímetros) de lluvia en la región, con acumulaciones aisladas de 15 pulgadas (38 centímetros) posibles.

Por otra parte, la tormenta tropical Dolores tocó tierra en la costa oeste de México con una fuerza cercana a un huracán. Hasta el domingo por la mañana, se había disipado sobre México. Sus remanentes tenían vientos máximos sostenidos de 25 mph (35 kph) y su centro se encontraba a unas 170 millas (275 kilómetros) al este de Mazatlán, México.

Se esperaban fuertes lluvias totales de hasta 15 pulgadas (38 centímetros) en las áreas costeras suroeste y oeste de México durante el fin de semana. Los meteorólogos advirtieron sobre la posibilidad de inundaciones repentinas y deslizamientos de tierra.

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