Connect with us

WOW

What We Know About The 13 U.S. Service Members Killed In The Kabul Attack

Published

on

13 U.S. Service Members Killed In The Kabul Attack

The U.S. Department of Defense on Saturday released the names of the 13 service members killed in Thursday’s attack at the airport in Kabul. The attack marked one of the deadliest days for American forces in the past decade of the 20-year war in Afghanistan — and took place just days ahead of the U.S.’s planned full withdrawal from the country that was overtaken on Aug. 15 by the Taliban.

In a statement issued on Saturday, President Biden called the Americans who lost their lives in the bombing «heroes who made the ultimate sacrifice in service of our highest American ideals and while saving the lives of others.»

«Their bravery and selflessness has enabled more than 117,000 people at risk to reach safety thus far,» Biden said. «May God protect our troops and all those standing watch in these dangerous days.»

Advertisement

Shortly after a Saturday briefing at the Pentagon, Department of Defense officials said 11 Marines, one Army soldier and one member of the Navy were identified as those killed in the attack.

Here’s what NPR has learned so far about those killed, as reported by our staff, as well as other media outlets.

Marine Corps Lance Cpl. David L. Espinoza, 20, of Rio Bravo, Texas

Advertisement

An undated photo of David Lee Espinoza, a Marine among the 13 U.S. service members who were killed in a deadly airport suicide bombing in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Aug. 26, 2021.

Elizabeth Holguin told local TV station KGNS that she is trying to is trying to make sense of the death of her son, Lance Cpl. David Espinoza.

According to KGNS, Holguin received a phone call at 2:30 a.m. from the military to inform her that Espinoza had been killed in the explosion at the Kabul airport.

«He was a great kid. We never had trouble with him — nothing,» she said of her son. «He never got in trouble. He was a great guy, a great guy, very proud of him.»

Advertisement

Espinoza’s stepfather, Victor Manuel Dominguez, became a part of his life at age three, but Dominquez saw him as his own.

«He was never my stepson and I was never his stepfather,» he said.

Texas Rep. Henry Cuellar released a statement on Facebook saying that Espinoza is a hero and that his heart goes out to Espinoza’s family during this difficult time.

Advertisement

«David Espinoza, a Laredo native Marine killed in Afghanistan, embodied the values of America: grit, dedication, service, and valor,» Cuellar wrote. «When he joined the military after high school, he did so with the intention of protecting our nation and demonstrating his selfless acts of service. I mourn him and all the fallen heroes in Afghanistan.»

Marine Corps Sgt. Nicole L. Gee, 23, of Sacramento, Calif.

This undated photo provided by U.S. Department of Defense Twitter page posted on Aug. 20 shows Sgt. Nicole Gee holding a baby at Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul. Officials said Saturday that Gee was killed in Thursday’s bombing.

Just days before her death, Sgt. Nicole Gee posted a photo on Instagram of herself in uniform while holding a baby in Afghanistan with the caption, «I love my job.»

Advertisement

Another of Gee’s photos — posted more recently — shows her posing near a cargo plane as a line of people wait to board from the back. The photo is captioned: «Escorting evacuees onto the bird.»

Marine Corps Staff Sgt. Darin T. Hoover, 31, of Salt Lake City

An undated photo of Taylor Hoover, 31, a Marine among the 13 U.S. service members who were killed in a deadly airport suicide bombing in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Aug. 26.

Utah Gov. Spencer Cox released a statement Friday offering condolences to Hoover’s family, and saying he was «devastated» by the Marine’s death. Cox noted that Hoover died while helping to evacuate U.S. citizens and Afghans seeking asylum.

Advertisement

«Staff Sgt. Hoover served valiantly as a Marine and died serving his fellow countrymen as well as America’s allies in Afghanistan,» Cox said. «We honor his tremendous bravery and commitment to his country, even as we condemn the senseless violence that resulted in his death.»

Cox ordered to lower flags on state and public grounds until sunset on Monday.

The Deseret News reported that tributes to Hoover poured onto his Facebook page, including one from Hoover’s father, who is also also named Darin.

Advertisement

«Soooooo glad I got to see him before he left. I love you son!!! You’re my hero!!» the elder Hoover wrote. «Please check in on us once in a while. I’ll try to make you proud!!»

Army Staff Sgt. Ryan C. Knauss, 23, of Corryton, Tenn.

Army Staff Sgt. Ryan C. Knauss, 23, of Corryton, Tenn.

Marine Corps Cpl. Hunter Lopez, 22, of Indio, Calif.

Advertisement

An undated photo of Hunter Lopez, 22, a Marine among the 13 U.S. service members who were killed in a deadly airport suicide bombing in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Aug. 26.

Lopez is the son of two Riverside County Sheriff’s Department officers, Captain Herman Lopez and Deputy Alicia Lopez. The department announced Lopez’s death on Friday.

Sheriff Chad Bianco said on Facebook that Lopez planned on following in his parents’ footsteps and joining the department as a deputy when he got home from his deployment.

«Hunter, thank you for your service to our community and our country. My thoughts and prayers are with your family,» Bianco said.

Advertisement

Before joining the Marines, Lopez participated in the department’s career-oriented Explorer program from 2014 to 2017, while he was in high school, according to the sheriff’s office.

Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Rylee J. McCollum, 20, of Jackson, Wyo.

An undated photo of Rylee McCollum, 20, a Marine among the thirteen U.S. service members who were killed in a deadly airport suicide bombing in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Aug. 26.

«I’m devastated to learn Wyoming lost one of our own in yesterday’s terrorist attack in Kabul,» Gordon said. «Our thoughts and prayers are with the family and friends of Rylee McCollum of Bondurant. Jennie and I, along with all of Wyoming and the entire country thank Rylee for his service.»

Advertisement

McCollum’s father, Jim, told The New York Times that McCollum was helping with evacuations and guarding a checkpoint when the attack at the airport happened. His father said this was McCollum’s first deployment and that he had gotten married recently. His wife is expecting with their first child.

McCollum’s sister Cheyenne told East Idaho News that her brother was «going to be the best dad.» Cheyenne said her brother was the youngest of four siblings, her single father’s only son, and that he knew he wanted to be a Marine from a young age.

«He was a kid that touched everybody’s heart,» Cheyenne told East Idaho News. «He was a wrestler since he was 4. He knew he was going to be a Marine since he was about that same age. He used to walk around in just a diaper and in his sister’s pink princess boots carrying his toy rifle and play like he was in the Army or a Marine.»

Advertisement

His sister and his father told the Times that McCollum was a «beautiful soul» and that the family couldn’t have been more proud of him.

Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Dylan R. Merola, 20, of Rancho Cucamonga, Calif.

An undated photo of Dylan Merola, 20, a Marine among the 13 U.S. service members who were killed in a deadly airport suicide bombing in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Aug. 26.

Cpl. Dylan Merola was a graduate of Los Osos High School, according to ABC 7 of Los Angeles. Students honored him at a football game on Friday night by wearing red, white and blue, the TV station reported.

Advertisement

Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Kareem M. Nikoui, 20, of Norco, Calif.

An undated photo of Kareem Nikoui, 20, a Marine among the 13 U.S. service members who were killed in a deadly airport suicide bombing in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Aug. 26.

Norco Mayor Kevin Bash told ABC7 that Nikoui died helping to save families of Afghans who had aided the U.S. government.

«My understanding is that he rescued – per a sergeant that wrote the family – he rescued three families,» Bash told the TV station. «And he was in the process of saving children, translators that had worked for the U.S. government. He passed off a child and went back into the crowd and that’s when the bomb went off.»

Advertisement

Nikoui graduated from Norco High School in 2019, where he was a member of the JROTC program.

Nikoui’s father Steve told The Daily Beast that his son «loved what he was doing, he always wanted to be a Marine.»

«He really loved that [Marine Corps] family,» Steve told The Daily Beast. «He was devoted—he was going to make a career out of this, and he wanted to go. No hesitation for him to be called to duty.»

Advertisement

The city of Norco says it plans to put Nikoui’s name on the «Lest We Forget Wall» at the George A. Ingalls Veterans Memorial Plaza, which honors city residents «who made the ultimate sacrifice while serving our nation.»

Marine Corps Sgt. Johanny Rosariopichardo, 25, of Lawrence, Mass.

Sgt. Johanny Rosariopichardo pictured in a photo from May 2021.

Marine Corps Cpl. Humberto A. Sanchez, 22, of Logansport, Ind.

Advertisement

An undated photo of Humberto Sanchez, 22, a Marine among the 13 U.S. service members who were killed in a deadly airport suicide bombing in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Aug. 26.

Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Jared M. Schmitz, 20, of St. Charles, Mo.

An undated photo of Jared Schmitz, 20, a Marine among the 13 U.S. service members who were killed in a deadly airport suicide bombing in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Aug. 26.

Schmitz was on his first deployment, according to Fox 2 News St. Louis, and was sent back to Afghanistan from Jordan to help with the evacuation efforts.

«My baby boy…my son…my marine…my warrior….my soul. I will never forget my HERO,» his father Mark said on Facebook.

Advertisement

His father told the St. Louis radio station KMOX that his son had always wanted to be a Marine and that he had «never seen a young man train as hard as he did to be the best soldier he could be.»

«His life meant so much more,» Mark told KMOX. «I’m so incredibly devastated that I won’t be able to see the man that he was very quickly growing into becoming.»

Lexie Correa, Schmitz’s former girlfriend whom he kept in touch with, told Fox 2 News that she will miss his laugh the most.

Advertisement

«You could be having the worst day ever and just a phone call from him would make your day so much better,» Correa said.

Correa, who said she also joined the military, said that Schmitz was obsessed with the local hockey team, the St. Louis Blues and remembered a watch party where «he got so excited when we won that Stanley Cup.»

Navy Hospitalman Maxton W. Soviak, 22, of Berlin Heights, Ohio

Advertisement

An undated photo of Max Soviak, 22, a Navy medic among the 13 U.S. service members who were killed in a deadly airport suicide bombing in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Aug. 26.

The Soviak family released a statement on Saturday about the loss of their son Max, who they say planned to make a career out of his Navy service.

«Words cannot express how heartbroken we are with this news and we will miss Max tremendously,» the statement said. «We are struggling to come to grips with this personal tragedy and prefer to grieve with close friends and family.»

His family says that Max was most proud of being a Navy Corpsman and «devil doc» for the Marines.

Advertisement

The statement said Max leaves behind a big family of 12 brothers and sisters.

Multiple Ohio lawmakers released statements about Max’s death, including Ohio Sen. Rob Portman, Rep. Marcy Kaptur and Rep. Tim Ryan. All of them expressed their condolences for his family and friends.

«Our nation mourns the loss of Navy Corpsman Max Soviak, whose uncommon courage in the face of unfathomable danger ensured the safe passage of countless civilians,» Kaptur said in her statement. «We will never be able to repay the debt we owe him, but we will be forever grateful for his willingness to serve when America needed him most. Our hearts go out to his family during this time, and we lift them up in prayer that they may find comfort in his memory.»

Advertisement

Marine Corps Cpl. Daegan W. Page, 23, of Omaha, Neb.

An undated photo of Daegan William-Tyeler Page, 23, a Marine among the 13 U.S. service members who were killed in a deadly airport suicide bombing in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Aug. 26.

 

Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Comentanos

WOW

Los maestros superestrellas de nuestro Student Podcast Challenge

Published

on

Logotipo de SPC 2022

¡Es esa época del año otra vez! Encienda sus teléfonos inteligentes y construya sus fortalezas de almohadas, porque estamos a punto de abrir el Student Podcast Challenge de NPR. Cada año, escuchamos increíbles voces de estudiantes de todo el país y transmitimos las mejores entradas de podcasts de estudiantes en Edición de la mañana, Todas las cosas consideradas, Interruptor de códigosy otros programas de NPR.

El concurso, que ha atraído a más de 40.000 estudiantes de todo el país a la narración de audio, está de regreso en su cuarto año: se abre en diciembre para estudiantes universitarios y en enero para los grados 5-12. (Para obtener más información sobre el concurso, visite nuestro sitio web y suscríbase a nuestro boletín de noticias).

Al juzgar estas entradas ahora durante tres años consecutivos, hemos notado que los nombres de ciertas escuelas y ciertos maestros siguen apareciendo regularmente. Está la escuela secundaria Stilwell en Stilwell, Oklahoma, y ​​los estudiantes de la clase de Faith Phillips. Y la clase de Zehra Lakhani de Clearwater Fundamental Middle School, en Clearwater, Florida, que consistentemente tiene los mejores contendientes.

Advertisement

Y luego, está la notable serie de menciones honoríficas y finalistas exitosos que provienen de una escuela secundaria en Cicero, Illinois.

Cicero, Ill— Los maestros Mark Sujak, Sarah Lorraine, Jeremy Robinson y Sophia Faridi posan con los estudiantes y finalistas de podcast Julian Fausto y Eric Guadarrama para retratos frente a Morton East High School, el viernes 30 de julio de 2021. Foto: Olivia Obineme para NPR.

olivia obineme / NPR

Advertisement


ocultar leyenda

alternar subtítulo

Advertisement

olivia obineme / NPR

Cicero, Ill— Los maestros Mark Sujak, Sarah Lorraine, Jeremy Robinson y Sophia Faridi posan con los estudiantes y finalistas de podcast Julian Fausto y Eric Guadarrama para retratos frente a Morton East High School, el viernes 30 de julio de 2021. Foto: Olivia Obineme para NPR.

olivia obineme / NPR

Advertisement

Y así, para comenzar el cuarto año del desafío de podcasts, hicimos una visita a J. Sterling Morton East High School y conocimos al equipo de maestros ganadores allí para descubrir la salsa secreta que hace que los podcasts de sus estudiantes chisporroteen. Es una escuela suburbana de 3.500 estudiantes a solo nueve millas del centro de la ciudad de Chicago.

Mark Sujak, Jeremy Robinson, Sophia Faridi y Sarah Lorraine son educadores veteranos allí; juntos tienen casi cuatro décadas de experiencia en la enseñanza. Con tres finalistas en los últimos dos años y de 5 a 15 menciones honoríficas todos los años, la escuela realmente tiene un gran impacto. Nuestros colegas de NPR que revisan los podcasts antes de entregar a los finalistas al panel de jueces conocen esta escuela por su nombre.

En pocas palabras: ¡Los estudiantes de estos cuatro maestros hacen excelentes podcasts!

Advertisement

Entonces, ¿cuál es su secreto? Todos dicen que la colaboración es clave. Estos educadores, tres profesores de inglés y un bibliotecario, no pretenden ser expertos en todo. Dividen el trabajo y aprovechan las fortalezas de los demás durante un campamento de entrenamiento de audio de dos días para sus estudiantes cada otoño.

«Sarah es como nuestra reina de la investigación, Sophia es como el periodismo y la investigación de antecedentes. He incursionado en la edición audiovisual desde que tenía 17 años, así que puedo ayudar con cuestiones técnicas», explica Mark Sujak. «Y Jeremy es nuestro maestro de la historia, así que dividimos el [students] en cuatro grupos y darles lecciones durante dos días «.

Luego, a lo largo del año escolar, usan podcasts en sus clases para ayudar a los estudiantes a familiarizarse con el medio. Escuchar episodios de podcasts populares ayuda a los niños a obtener ideas y modelar sus propias presentaciones.

Advertisement

Así empezó el podcast de Julian Fausto y Eric Guadarrama «Teens and Ink», uno de los finalistas del año pasado. Julian dice que decidió ver los pros y los contras de hacerse tatuajes en la escuela secundaria después de escuchar El Nod episodio «Drake y la diáspora» en la clase de Mark Sujak.

Una vez que los estudiantes tienen una idea y comienzan a discutir su proyecto, deben presentarla a un panel de tres personas. Podría ser el director, la enfermera de la escuela y un trabajador de mantenimiento, o un consejero escolar, un maestro de español y la recepcionista de la oficina principal. Los maestros realmente querían involucrar a toda la escuela en este proceso. Modelaron el proceso a partir del programa de televisión Shark Tank, y dicen que normalmente el proceso hace que las ideas de los estudiantes sean más refinadas y en general en mejor forma para terminar el proyecto.

El año pasado, con casi todo en la escuela movido en línea, los cuatro maestros tuvieron que cambiar un poco las cosas. Los estudiantes enviaron presentaciones en video para que los docentes las vieran, y esos educadores darían comentarios en video en su propio tiempo.

Advertisement

Los cuatro profesores se están preparando para incorporar podcasting en sus clases este año, y estaremos atentos a los fantásticos podcasts de sus estudiantes … ¡y de miles de personas en todo el país!

Escuche más sobre los maestros de Cicero en el episodio de esta semana del podcast de los estudiantes:

Los maestros superestrellas de nuestro Student Podcast Challenge

Algunos detalles:

Así que este año, como el año pasado, organizaremos dos concursos: el tradicional Student Podcast Challenge con dos categorías: grados 5-8 y 9-12; y el College Podcast Challenge, donde todos los estudiantes, independientemente de su edad, que buscan un título de asociado o licenciatura, pueden postularse.

Advertisement

En ambos casos, los conceptos básicos son prácticamente los mismos: los estudiantes crearán un podcast sobre un tema que quieran explorar y, básicamente, eso puede ser casi cualquier cosa. En el pasado, teníamos podcasts sobre el cambio climático y el racismo y cómo es ser un niño. Entradas sobre Tater Tots y videojuegos, la historia y la vida en una pandemia, y si las mofetas o los erizos son las mejores mascotas.

Como en el pasado, las entradas de estudiantes de secundaria y preparatoria provendrán de un maestro o un líder estudiantil que sea adulto. Los estudiantes universitarios, siempre que tenga 18 años o más, pueden ingresar por su cuenta.

La duración máxima de los podcasts es de 8 minutos para ambos concursos.

Advertisement

Las inscripciones para el College Podcast Challenge se abrirán el 1 de diciembre, con la fecha límite final el 28 de febrero de 2022. Para los estudiantes de secundaria y preparatoria, las inscripciones se abrirán el 1 de enero y cerrarán el 21 de marzo.

Entonces, estudiantes, estamos ansiosos por saber de ustedes: ¡Póngase los auriculares, conecte los micrófonos y comience a grabar!

Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading

WOW

El muralista de Ahmaud Arbery recurre a la historia de Brunswick

Published

on

Marvin Weeks frente a su mural de Ahmaud Arbrery.

Advertisement

Debbie Elliott / NPR


ocultar leyenda

Advertisement

alternar subtítulo

Debbie Elliott / NPR

Marvin Weeks frente a su mural de Ahmaud Arbrery.

Advertisement

Debbie Elliott / NPR

BRUNSWICK, Ga. – El juicio de tres hombres blancos acusados ​​de asesinar a Ahmaud Arbery ha vuelto a poner a Brunswick en el centro de atención nacional. Arbery era el hombre negro de 25 años asesinado a tiros el año pasado mientras corría por un vecindario.

El artista Marvin Weeks homenajeó a Arbery en un mural que se ha convertido en un punto focal para los defensores de la justicia racial en esta ciudad de la costa de Georgia.

Advertisement

«Creo que eso es muy importante», dice Weeks. «Un lugar de reunión, ya sabes, porque mi trabajo realmente se centra en los vecindarios».

El domingo pasado, antes de la selección del jurado, unos 200 manifestantes corearon «¡Justicia para Ahmaud!» debajo del retrato de dos pisos de Arbery. Weeks lo pintó en el costado de un edificio que está siendo remodelado como centro cultural afroamericano.

Weeks dice que esto es lo que esperaba que sucediera alrededor de la obra de arte.

Advertisement

«Porque siempre hay un lugar de encuentro, un lugar para hacer la llamada y hablar sobre los problemas que están sucediendo», dice. «Creo que el mural hace eso».

El mural está adaptado de la foto de graduación de la escuela secundaria de Arbery. Está sonriendo y vestido con un esmoquin. Weeks lo pintó en una pared de tabby, que es un revestimiento fuerte, parecido al estuco, hecho de arena, conchas marinas y cal. El método fue traído aquí por africanos esclavizados.

«Pensé que era un elemento perfecto para ilustrarlo en él», dice Weeks, señalando cómo las texturas le dan a la pintura una sensación distintiva.

Advertisement

«Cuando lo miras de cerca, creo que ves caminos de diferentes cosas allí».

Una obra de arte para todo Brunswick

Weeks, de 67 años, creció en Brunswick, en una casa no muy lejos de aquí. Se fue cuando era joven para seguir su carrera artística en Florida, donde se desempeña en el Miami Arts and Entertainment Council.

Pero Weeks permanece arraigado a su comunidad de origen. Y ahora, después del asesinato de Arbery, pasa más tiempo aquí. Está planeando otra instalación de arte en la esquina cerca del mural Arbery.

Advertisement

«Esta será una obra de arte para todo Brunswick», dice. «Muestra la historia de Brunswick y la historia afroamericana no está desconectada de la historia general».

Weeks ha instalado un estudio improvisado dentro del sitio del centro cultural donde tiene grandes recortes de madera contrachapada que está recubriendo con imprimación blanca. Estos serán la base de su diseño para transformar un letrero oxidado, que quedó de un restaurante demolido hace años, en algo nuevo.

Marvin Weeks pega hojas de roble para su obra más reciente.

Advertisement

Liz Baker / NPR


ocultar leyenda

Advertisement

alternar subtítulo

Liz Baker / NPR

Marvin Weeks pega hojas de roble para su obra más reciente.

Advertisement

Liz Baker / NPR

«Será como el gran bulbo de un árbol», dice, y explica cómo las enredaderas y las ramas incorporarán retratos de figuras clave junto con paisajes del entorno de Brunswick.

«Conseguí algunas hojas de roble y las coloqué allí», dice. Y conchas de ostra.

Advertisement

Weeks recuerda con cariño crecer entre las marismas saladas de Brunswick y los robles cubiertos de musgo español. Dice que cuando era niño cavaba en su jardín en busca de fragmentos de cerámica y otros fragmentos de la historia. El pulgar verde de su madre fue una gran influencia.

«Mi madre era una amante de las flores aquí mismo en Brunswick», dice. «Ella arreglaba sus patios. Nunca pensamos que éramos pobres porque era muy rico con tantas cosas que hacíamos. Simplemente ve y planta una flor y cambiarás ese vecindario».

Encontrar historias ocultas y ‘silenciadas’ durante décadas

Ahora Weeks está tratando de cambiar a Brunswick ampliando la conversación para incluir historias que han estado ocultas o silenciadas durante décadas.

Advertisement

Despliega un retrato de una figura de la era de la Reconstrucción que quiere incluir en la instalación.

«He estado investigando Tunis Campbell y el legado que dejó a lo largo de la costa que la gente ha escondido y del que no ha hablado», dice Weeks.

Campbell fue un líder afroamericano clave: un senador estatal y gobernador militar de comunidades de personas anteriormente esclavizadas en las islas del mar de Georgia. Los antiguos dueños de esclavos eventualmente los expulsaron de la tierra.

Advertisement

Weeks dice que no reconocer todo lo que ha sucedido aquí permite que la historia se repita. Y así ve el asesinato de Ahmaud Arbery, una tragedia poco conocida cuando ocurrió en febrero de 2020.

Una camioneta era el enemigo

No fue hasta meses después, cuando se filtró el video gráfico de un teléfono celular, que Arbery se convirtió en otro nombre para llamar al movimiento por la justicia racial.

El video muestra a tres hombres blancos persiguiendo a Arbery con camionetas mientras él corre por un vecindario en las afueras de la ciudad. Cuando está acorralado, Arbery se defiende y es asesinado por tres disparos de escopeta.

Advertisement

Mural de Ahmaud Arbery.

Nicole Buchanan para NPR


ocultar leyenda

Advertisement

alternar subtítulo

Nicole Buchanan para NPR

Advertisement

Weeks dice que no pudo evitar pensar en su infancia, cuando él y sus amigos atravesaban callejones en barrios blancos.

«Una camioneta era el enemigo», recuerda.

Advertisement

Describió que cuando los niños negros iban caminando a la tienda o al parque, los blancos los pasaban en la parte trasera de las camionetas.

«Y gritarte y tirarte algo. Todo el mundo de mi edad podría decirte que ese era el miedo cuando veías venir una camioneta».

Weeks dice que cree que persiste una división racial porque la gente no ha sido honesta sobre su historia compartida y su interconexión.

Advertisement

«Todo el mundo dice ‘cállate, cálmate, los forasteros están entrando’, como si alguien viniera a contar esta historia, como si hubiera algo que esconder», dice Weeks.

«Creo que continuamos con el viejo ‘todo está bien, muéstrales a todos desde afuera que todo está bien’. No ha estado bien «.

Weeks dice que no estará bien hasta que la gente pueda reconocer que Brunswick pertenece a todos sus ciudadanos sin importar su raza.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading

WOW

El baterista y leyenda local Mel Brown perdura como el humilde padrino del jazz de Portland

Published

on

Mel Brown, Festival de Jazz de Montavilla 2019

Advertisement

Kathryn Elsesser / Kathryn Elsesser Fotografía


ocultar leyenda

Advertisement

alternar subtítulo

Kathryn Elsesser / Kathryn Elsesser Fotografía

Mel Brown, Festival de Jazz de Montavilla 2019

Advertisement

Kathryn Elsesser / Kathryn Elsesser Fotografía

La familia de Mel Brown se mudó a Portland, Oregón desde Arkansas a principios de la década de 1940. Nació en 1944, el último de seis hermanos y el único nativo de Oregon. En la escuela secundaria, la habilidad de Brown para tocar la batería era evidente, y cuando tenía 19 años ya se había asegurado un concierto tocando con Billy Larkin y Delegates, el líder del soul-jazz. El exitoso disco de esa banda, «Pigmy», terminaría dándole a Brown una muestra temprana de éxito y la confianza para acercarse al baterista de Miles Davis, Philly Joe Jones, para recibir lecciones.

El boyante bolsillo de Brown era resbaladizo y ágil, lo que le sirvió bien en escenarios de jazz. Pero sabía cómo llevar el funk: George Benson y el Dr. Lonnie Smith lo contrataron para sesiones de soul-jazz y, desde finales de los sesenta hasta mediados de los setenta, se desempeñó como baterista de casa para muchas revistas de Motown, en las que una banda de la casa se quedaba quieta mientras diferentes cabezas de cartel (incluidos Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye y Diana Ross) entraban y salían del escenario. Brown también estuvo de gira con The Temptations durante siete años, durante la polémica era posterior a David Ruffin.

Advertisement

Cuando terminó su tiempo con los Temps, Mel regresó a Portland, donde formó una familia y se reincorporó a la comunidad del jazz creando una nueva infraestructura para apoyarla. Ese trabajo comenzó con una jam session semanal, luego conciertos semanales; Brown se encontró tocando jazz para la generación de sus padres y le encantó. Como hicieron ellos.

También abrió una tienda de percusión, ofreciendo lecciones y luego iniciando un campamento de jazz que continuó durante casi dos décadas. A lo largo de todo, Brown actuó regularmente en lugares como Jimmy Mak’s y Jack London Revue. Tanto con su septeto, inspirado en los Jazz Messengers de Art Blakey, como con su grupo de órgano B-3, fusionó la precisión de Motown con la elasticidad del bebop.

Mel Brown, Entrevistas en el Festival de Jazz de Montavilla 2019

Advertisement

Kathryn Elsesser / Kathryn Elsesser Fotografía


ocultar leyenda

Advertisement

alternar subtítulo

Kathryn Elsesser / Kathryn Elsesser Fotografía

Mel Brown, Entrevistas en el Festival de Jazz de Montavilla 2019

Advertisement

Kathryn Elsesser / Kathryn Elsesser Fotografía

En este episodio de Noche de Jazz en América, escucharemos un concierto ardiente del cuarteto de órgano de Brown del Festival de Jazz de Montavilla 2019. Y compartirá algunas historias coloridas en una conversación con nuestro anfitrión, Christian McBride (un fan acérrimo de Temptations). El hijo de Brown, Christopher, dice que él «siempre quiso ser un tipo de persona que se pone manos a la obra», lo que sugiere que su carrera es un sueño cumplido. «Es un profesional consumado», añade Christopher, «y comprende que tiene que seguir el camino y mostrar el camino».

Músicos: Mel Brown, batería; Renato Caranto, saxofón tenor; Dan Balmer, guitarra; Louis «King Louie» Pain; Organo

Advertisement

Lista de conjuntos:

  • Cuatro contra seis (Wes Montgomery)
  • Brulie (Louis Pain)
  • Hitos (Miles Davis)
  • Billie Jean (Michael Jackson)
  • La Sra. Jones y yo (Kenny Gamble, Leon Huff, Cary Gilbert)
  • Hermanos mayores (Louis Pain)
  • Estaré allí (Berry Gordy, Bob West, Willie Hutch, Hal Davis)
  • Escopeta (Autry DeWalt)
  • Blues 1 y 8 (Jack McDuff)
  • What’s Going On (Al Cleveland, Renaldo Benson, Marvin Gaye)
  • Bry-Yen / I Believe In You (Louis Pain, Don Davis)

Créditos: Escritor y productor: Alex Ariff; Anfitrión: Christian McBride; Ingeniero de grabación: Rick Gordon y Patrick Brewer; Ingeniero de mezcla, David Tallacksen; Audio de archivo e ingeniero de entrevistas con Mel Brown, James Theory; Registrador de campo, Meg Samples; Gerente de proyecto: Suraya Mohamed; Productor principal: Katie Simon; El director senior de NPR Music, Keith Jenkins; Productores ejecutivos: Anya Grundmann y Gabrielle Armand.

Gracias: Neil Matson, Ryan Meager, Kim Gumbel y Matt Fleeger

Advertisement

Comentarios

0 Comentarios

Continue Reading

Facebook

¿Búscas empleo?

Videos

Lo más visto

A %d blogueros les gusta esto: